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A History of News: From the Drum to the Satellite
     

A History of News: From the Drum to the Satellite

by Mitchell Stephens
 
This basic text addresses issues in contemporary American journalism from an extended historical perspective and also includes material on the development of news in other societies. The breadth of coverage makes this text both a valuable resource in the classroom and for future reference.

Overview

This basic text addresses issues in contemporary American journalism from an extended historical perspective and also includes material on the development of news in other societies. The breadth of coverage makes this text both a valuable resource in the classroom and for future reference.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Humankind has always been interested in news, notes New York University journalism professor Stephens, and in this impressive work he shows how that interest has been satisfied. Although it is impossible to provide examples of the oral transmission of news from preliterate societies before the third millennium B.C., the author demonstrates it in action among primitives in the 19th and 20th centuries. Thence he moves to handwritten news, sometimes in personal letters, sometimes in public notices, like the acta posted and copied in ancient Rome and the newsletters written in Renaissance Venice, which were the immediate predecessors of newspapers. News in print followed quickly after the invention of movable type and newspapers proliferated, until they began to be supplemented, if not supplanted, by the electronic media. This solid history is made even more absorbing by such sidelights as the universal fascination with gossip, gore and the supernatural and trenchant observations about the relationship between society and the news it consumes. (September)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Traditional accounts of journalism tend to move from one historically important paper to another, but Stephens (journalism, New York University) breaks that mold. He proffers a broader social focus on the changing form and function of news and gives us the world view, not just that of America. He deftly traces news from primitive societies to early modern Europe up through electronic media today. His final chapter, ``A Surfeit of Data,'' perceptively and concisely sums up the gains and losses of our current journalistic forms. His version also is less trenchant and analytical than Michael Schudson's similarly focused Discovering the News : A Social History of American Newspapers (Basic, 1978). Very useful for college journalism curricula. Daniel Levinson, Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670813780
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
09/20/1988
Product dimensions:
1.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 1.00(d)

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