A History of Philosophy Volume I: Greece and Rome- From the Pre-Scoratics to Plotinus
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A History of Philosophy Volume I: Greece and Rome- From the Pre-Scoratics to Plotinus

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by Frederick Copleston
     
 

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Conceived originally as a serious presentation of the development of philosophy for Catholic seminary students, Frederick Copleston's nine-volume A History Of Philosophy has journeyed far beyond the modest purpose of its author to universal acclaim as the best history of philosophy in English.

Copleston, an Oxford Jesuit of immense

Overview

Conceived originally as a serious presentation of the development of philosophy for Catholic seminary students, Frederick Copleston's nine-volume A History Of Philosophy has journeyed far beyond the modest purpose of its author to universal acclaim as the best history of philosophy in English.

Copleston, an Oxford Jesuit of immense erudition who once tangled with A. J. Ayer in a fabled debate about the existence of God and the possibility of metaphysics, knew that seminary students were fed a woefully inadequate diet of theses and proofs, and that their familiarity with most of history's great thinkers was reduced to simplistic caricatures. Copleston set out to redress the wrong by writing a complete history of Western philosophy, one crackling with incident and intellectual excitement — and one that gives full place to each thinker, presenting his thought in a beautifully rounded manner and showing his links to those who went before and to those who came after him.

The result of Copleston's prodigious labors is a history of philosophy that is unlikely ever to be surpassed. Thought magazine summed up the general agreement among scholars and students alike when it reviewed Copleston's A History of Philosophy as "broad-minded and objective, comprehensive and scholarly, unified and well proportioned... We cannot recommend [it] too highly."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385468435
Publisher:
Crown Religion/Business/Forum
Publication date:
03/28/1993
Series:
History of Philosophy Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
544
Sales rank:
348,175
Product dimensions:
5.38(w) x 8.15(h) x 1.17(d)

Meet the Author

Frederick Copleston grew up in England (1907-1994). He was raised in an Anglican home but converted to Catholicism while a student at Marlborough College. He later became a Jesuit and then pursued a career in academia. He studied and lectured at Heythrop College and wrote an eleven-volume History of Philosophy, which is highly respected. He also spent time teaching at Gregorian University in Rome and, after he retired, lectured at Santa Clara University in California. He was appointed a member of the British Academy in 1970. He is famouse for debating Betrand Russell over the existence of God in a 1948 BBC broadcast.

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A History of Philosophy Volume I: Greece and Rome- From the Pre-Scoratics to Plotinus 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Frederick Copleston's A History of Philosophy, Volume I covers philosophy from its pre-Socratic roots through the dawn of the Middle Ages. For those readers who have read Durant's The Story of Philosophy and desire more detail look no further. This volume is richly textured; it is very well thought-out, combining historical fact with Copleston's own musings. The chapters dealing with the pre-Socratic philosophers is especially illuminating, reminding the reader that Socrates was the inheritor of an established Greek philosophic tradition rather than its progenitor. Philosophic issues that affect us still were contemplated 2500 years ago, including the nature of reality (metaphysics), how humans obatin knowledge (epistemology) and how man should conduct himself (ethics). Such great questions all were tackled by these seminal Greek thinkers. Copleston does not gloss over philosophic tenets when discussing each significant philosopher or school. He provides in-depth examples from their writings. This ample source material allows the reader to delve into philosophic thought without being completely overwhelmed by it. Copleston is very careful to attribute his thoughts concerning a particular philosophy so that the reader may know where fact ends and speculation begins. This, one can argue, is only appropriate from an author that loves philosophy as Copleston must. There are several irritants though for the laymen. The book is larded with philosophical terms (e.g., epistemology, nous, eclecticism). I found it necessary to purchase a dictionary of terms to accompany my reading. The greatest drawback of the volume is Copleston's habit of sprinkling quotes in Greek and Latin. This is irritating as it upsets the flow of reading and there is no translation provided! I almost regard this as an affectation of the author, detracting from my overall enjoyment of the volume. Luckily, the book is understandable and the intellectual rewards when one finishes are satisfying. I have a much better grasp of philosophy and the eternal issues that the Greeks contemplated. I intend to read the entire Copleston series. I have no plans to learn Greek, however.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Super...! Great...! Wonderful...!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Over the course of a few years I have read most of this series. Only a few books have given me as much as this series. They are difficult, 'But all noble things are as difficlut as they are rare.' Spinoza, Ethics.