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A History of the Roman World: 753 to 146 BC / Edition 5

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Overview

This definitive study from the author of From the Gracchi to Nero, examines the period from the foundation of Rome to the fall of Carthage. An accessible introduction to these centuries of change, this book will also be useful as context for those studying later developments in Roman history.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415305044
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 3/28/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

List of maps
Preface to first edition
Preface to second edition
Preface to third edition
Preface to fourth edition
Introduction
Pt. I Rome and Italy 1
Ch. I The Land and its Peoples 3
1 The land 3
2 Early man 5
3 The Copper and Bronze Ages 8
4 The Early Iron Age Villanovans 12
5 The Italic peoples 18
6 Greeks, Phoenicians and Celts 20
7 The Etruscans 25
8 Etruscan culture 28
9 The Etruscan Empire 33
10 Early Latium 36
Ch. II Regal Rome 42
1 The foundation of Rome: archaeological evidence 42
2 The foundation of Rome: the legends 46
3 The early kings 50
4 The sixth-century kings 53
5 Etruscan Rome 56
6 Nobles, commons and the priesthood 62
7 Political organization 67
8 The fall of the monarchy 74
Ch. III The New Republic and the Struggle of the Orders 78
1 The Republican government 78
2 Land and debt 81
3 A state within the state 84
4 The decemvirs and law 86
5 The weakening of patrician control 89
Ch. IV The Roman Republic and its Neighbours 92
1 The Triple Alliance 92
2 The Sabines, Aequi and Volsci 94
3 The duel with Veii 97
4 The Gallic catastrophe 101
5 The recovery of Rome 104
6 Rome's widening horizon 108
7 The end of the Latin League 111
Ch. V The Union of the Orders and the Constitution 115
1 Economic distress 115
2 Victories of the plebeians 117
3 Social and political adjustments 119
4 The magistrates and Senate 123
5 The assemblies and People 128
Ch. VI Rome's Conquest and Organization of Italy 131
1 Rome and Campania 131
2 The Great Samnite War 132
3 Rome's triumphant advance 136
4 The Greeks of southern Italy 139
5 The Italian adventure of Pyrrhus 141
6 The end of pre-Roman Italy 144
7 The Roman confederacy 146
Pt. II Rome and Carthage 155
Ch. VII The First Struggle 157
1 The Carthaginian Empire 157
2 Carthage 160
3 The causes of the war 164
4 Rome's naval offensive 167
5 Rome's offensive in Africa 171
6 Stalemate and checkmate 173
Ch. VIII The Entr'acte 179
1 The province of Sicily 179
2 Carthage and the Sardinian question 183
3 Rome and the Gauls 186
4 The Illyrian pirates 191
5 The Punic Empire in Spain 195
6 The causes of the Second Punic War 198
Ch. IX Hannibal's Offensive and Rome's Defensive 203
1 Hannibal's invasion of northern Italy 203
2 Hannibal in central Italy 207
3 The Scipios and Spain 211
4 The extension of the war to Macedon 214
5 Marcellus and Sicily 216
6 Fabius and Rome's defensive 219
Ch. X Scipio and Rome's Offensive 225
1 Scipio's conquest of Spain 225
2 The war in Italy 229
3 The Roman offensive in Africa 232
4 Victory and peace 236
Pt. III Rome and the Mediterranean 241
Ch. XI Rome and Greece 243
1 The Hellenistic world 243
2 The outbreak of war 245
3 The causes of the war 248
4 The Second Macedonian War 251
5 The settlement of Greece 255
Ch. XII Rome and Antiochus 259
1 The diplomatic conflict 259
2 The war in Greece 262
3 The war in Asia 266
4 The settlement of the east 270
Ch. XIII Rome and the Eastern Mediterranean 274
1 The growing tension 274
2 The Third Macedonian War 279
3 The Hellenistic east 283
4 The end of Greek independence 289
Ch. XIV Rome, Italy and the Western Mediterranean 292
1 The northern frontier 292
2 Cato and Gracchus in Spain 297
3 The Celtiberian and Lusitanian Wars 300
4 The Numantine War 303
5 Carthage and Masinissa 306
6 Delenda est Carthago 308
7 The fall of Carthage 311
Ch. XV Roman Policy and the Government 318
1 Home policy 318
2 Foreign policy and the provinces 324
3 The senatorial oligarchy 329
4 The rival families 333
Pt. IV Roman life and culture 339
Ch. XVI Economic and Social Organization 341
1 Agriculture 341
2 Warfare 345
3 Commerce and industry 348
4 Currency and finance 353
5 Slavery 357
6 Family life 359
7 Greek influences 361
8 The city 366
9 Law 373
Ch. XVII Literature and Art 377
1 Early Latin 377
2 The poets 379
3 Prose writers 385
4 Art 386
Ch. XVIII Roman Religion 390
1 The religion of the family 390
2 The religion of the state 393
3 Foreign cults 397
Ch. XIX Sources and Authorities 406
1 Archaeology and inscriptions 406
2 Calendars and Fasti 407
3 The historians 409
4 Sources 413
5 Chronology 418
Chronological table 420
Select bibliography 432
Abbreviations 438
Notes 440
Index 531
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