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A History of the United States from the Colonial Period through World War 1
     

A History of the United States from the Colonial Period through World War 1

by Charles Beard
 
First. We have written a topical, not a narrative, history. We have tried to set forth the important aspects, problems, and movements of each period, bringing in the narrative rather by way of illustration.
Second. We have emphasized those historical topics which help to explain how our nation has come to be what it is to-day.
Third. We have dwelt fully upon

Overview

First. We have written a topical, not a narrative, history. We have tried to set forth the important aspects, problems, and movements of each period, bringing in the narrative rather by way of illustration.
Second. We have emphasized those historical topics which help to explain how our nation has come to be what it is to-day.
Third. We have dwelt fully upon the social and economic aspects of our history, especially in relation to the politics of each period.
Fourth. We have treated the causes and results of wars, the problems of financing and sustaining armed forces, rather than military strategy. These are the subjects which belong to a history for civilians. These are matters which civilians can understand—matters which they must understand, if they are to play well their part in war and peace.
Fifth. By omitting the period of exploration, we have been able to enlarge the treatment of our own time. We have given special attention to the history of those current questions which must form the subject matter of sound instruction in citizenship.
Sixth. We have borne in mind that America, with all her unique characteristics, is a part of a general civilization. Accordingly we have given diplomacy, foreign affairs, world relations, and the reciprocal influences of nations their appropriate place.
Seventh. We have deliberately aimed at standards of maturity. The study of a mere narrative calls mainly for the use of the memory. We have aimed to stimulate habits of analysis, comparison, association, reflection, and generalization—habits calculated to enlarge as well as inform the mind. We have been at great pains to make our text clear, simple, and direct; but we have earnestly sought to stretch the intellects of our readers—to put them upon their mettle. Most of them will receive the last of their formal instruction in the high school. The world will soon expect maturity from them. Their achievements will depend upon the possession of other powers than memory alone. The effectiveness of their citizenship in our republic will be measured by the excellence of their judgment as well as the fullness of their information.

Contents:


PREFACE
THE GREAT MIGRATION TO AMERICA
COLONIAL AGRICULTURE, INDUSTRY, AND COMMERCE
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROGRESS
THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLONIAL NATIONALISM
THE NEW COURSE IN BRITISH IMPERIAL POLICY
THE FORMATION OF THE CONSTITUTION
THE CLASH OF POLITICAL PARTIES
THE JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICANS IN POWER
THE FARMERS BEYOND THE APPALACHIANS
JACKSONIAN DEMOCRACY
THE MIDDLE BORDER AND THE GREAT WEST
THE RISE OF THE INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM
THE PLANTING SYSTEM AND NATIONAL POLITICS
THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC EVOLUTION OF THE SOUTH
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND THE REPUBLICAN PARTY
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE GREAT WEST
DOMESTIC ISSUES BEFORE THE COUNTRY (1865-1897)
AMERICA A WORLD POWER (1865-1900)
THE EVOLUTION OF REPUBLICAN POLICIES (1901-13)
THE SPIRIT OF REFORM IN AMERICA
THE NEW POLITICAL DEMOCRACY
INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY
PRESIDENT WILSON AND THE WORLD WAR
TABLE OF PRESIDENTS

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013599048
Publisher:
John Thomas Publishing
Publication date:
06/14/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,157,973
File size:
423 KB

Meet the Author

Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 – September 1, 1948) was, with Frederick Jackson Turner, one of the most influential American historians of the first half of the 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. His works included radical re-evaluation of the founding fathers of the United States, who he believed were motivated more by economics than by philosophical principles. Beard's most influential book, written with his wife Mary Beard, was the wide-ranging and bestselling The Rise of American Civilization (1927), which had a major influence on American historians.
Beard was famous as a political liberal, but he strenuously opposed American entry into World War II, for which he blamed Franklin D. Roosevelt more than Japan or Germany. This stance destroyed his career,[1] as his fellow scholars repudiated his foreign policy and dropped his materialistic model of class conflict. Richard Hofstadter concluded in 1968: "Today Beard's reputation stands like an imposing ruin in the landscape of American historiography. What was once the grandest house in the province is now a ravaged survival."[2]

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