A Hunt for Optimism

A Hunt for Optimism

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by Viktor Shklovsky
     
 

Begun in 1929 under the title "New Prose," and drastically revised after Vladimir Mayakovsky's sudden death, "A Hunt for Optimism" (1931) circles obsessively around a single scene of interrogation in which a writer is subjected to a show trial for his unorthodoxy. Using multiple perspectives, fragments, and aphorisms, and bearing the vulnerability of both the

Overview

Begun in 1929 under the title "New Prose," and drastically revised after Vladimir Mayakovsky's sudden death, "A Hunt for Optimism" (1931) circles obsessively around a single scene of interrogation in which a writer is subjected to a show trial for his unorthodoxy. Using multiple perspectives, fragments, and aphorisms, and bearing the vulnerability of both the Russian Jewry and the anti-Bolshevik intelligentsia--who had unwittingly become the "enemies of the people"--"Hunt" satirizes Soviet censorship and the ineptitude of Soviet leaders with acerbic panache. Despite criticism at the time that it lacked unity and was too "variegated" to be called a purely "Shklovskian book," "Hunt" is stylistically unpredictable, experimentally bold, and unapologetically ironic--making it one of the finest books in Shklovsky's body of work.

Editorial Reviews

Guy Davenport - National Review
“Shklovsky is a disciple worthy of Sterne. He has appropriated the device of infinitely delayed event, of the digression helplessly promising to return to the point, and of disguising his superbly controlled art with a breezy nonchalance. But it is not really Sterne that Shklovsky sounds like: it is an intellectual and witty Hemingway.”
Michael Dirda - Washington Post
“A rambling, digressive stylist, Shklovsky throws off brilliant aperçus on every page . . . Like an architect’s blueprint, [he] lays bare the joists and studs that hold up the house of fiction.”
National Review
Shklovsky is a disciple worthy of Sterne. He has appropriated the device of infinitely delayed event, of the digression helplessly promising to return to the point, and of disguising his superbly controlled art with a breezy nonchalance. But it is not really Sterne that Shklovsky sounds like: it is an intellectual and witty Hemingway.— Guy Davenport
Washington Post
A rambling, digressive stylist, Shklovsky throws off brilliant aperçus on every page . . . Like an architect’s blueprint, [he] lays bare the joists and studs that hold up the house of fiction.— Michael Dirda

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564787903
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Publication date:
01/03/2013
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Viktor Shklovsky (1893-1984) was a leading figure in the Russian Formalist movement of the 1920s and had a profound effect on twentieth-century Russian literature. Several of his books have been translated into English, including "Zoo, or Letters Not about Love, Third Factory, Theory of Prose, A Sentimental Journey, Energy of Delusion", and "Literature and Cinematography", and "Bowstring".

Viktor Shklovsky (1893-1984) was a leading figure in the Russian Formalist movement of the 1920s and had a profound effect on twentieth-century Russian literature. Several of his books have been translated into English, including "Zoo, or Letters Not about Love, Third Factory, Theory of Prose, A Sentimental Journey, Energy of Delusion", and "Literature and Cinematography", and "Bowstring".

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A Hunt for Optimism 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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