"A" Is for Alibi (Kinsey Millhone Series #1)

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Overview

Laurence Fife was a slick divorce lawyer and slippery ladies' man. Until someone killed him. The jury believed that it was his pretty young wife Nikki, so they sent her to prison for eight years. Now, Nikki's out on parole and Kinsey Millhone's in for trouble. Nikki hires Kinsey to discover who really killed her husband. But the trail is eight years cold, and at the end is a chilling twist even Kinsey doesn't suspect—a second eight-year-old murder and a brand new corpse. ...
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Overview

Laurence Fife was a slick divorce lawyer and slippery ladies' man. Until someone killed him. The jury believed that it was his pretty young wife Nikki, so they sent her to prison for eight years. Now, Nikki's out on parole and Kinsey Millhone's in for trouble. Nikki hires Kinsey to discover who really killed her husband. But the trail is eight years cold, and at the end is a chilling twist even Kinsey doesn't suspect—a second eight-year-old murder and a brand new corpse.
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  • Tagged! Interview: Sue Grafton
    Tagged! Interview: Sue Grafton  

Editorial Reviews

Newsweek
[Grafton] has created a woman we feel we know, a tough cookie with a soft center, a gregarious loner . . . smart, well paced, and very funny.
Newgate Callendar
It is no better or no worse than the majority of related books, and that is about all.— The New York Times Books of the Century, reviewed May 23, 1982
People Magazine
The best of the new breed of female mystery writers.
Newsweek
[Grafton] has created a woman we feel we know, a tough cookie with a soft center, a gregarious loner . . . smart, well paced, and very funny.
Newgate Callendar
It is no better or no worse than the majority of related books, and that is about all. -- The New York Times Books of the Century, reviewed May 23, 1982
From the Publisher
Praise for "A" Is for Alibi

"Kinsey Millhone is smart, sexual, likeable and a very modern operator. A pleasure to read."

—Dorothy Salisbury Davis

"[This] is what grandpa used to call a class act."

—Stanley Ellin

Praise for the Sue Grafton series: and Kinsey Millhone

"Wit is the most versatile weapon in Sue Grafton's well-stocked arsenal, and she uses it with disarming precision. . . . Grafton excels in this milieu."

—Newsweek

"A wonderful character, tough but not brutish, resourceful and sensitive, a fit knight to walk those mean streets with her male predecessors."

—Los Angeles Times

"Somebody I want to spend more time with."

—The New York Times Book Review

"Bright, brisk, and thoroughly engaging."

—The Washington Post

"A woman we feel we know, a tough cookie with a soft center, a gregarious loner."

—Newsweek

"Tough, stubborn, irreverent and ironic, a lady detective with class and sass."

—Baltimore Sun

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312938994
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/2005
  • Series: Kinsey Millhone Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 55,155
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

SUE GRAFTON is the New York Times #1 bestselling author for the alphabet series. She has been working on this series since 1982 and intends to complete the series in 2015.

Biography

Sue Grafton is published in 28 countries and 26 languages -- including Estonian, Bulgarian, and Indonesian. She's an international bestseller with a readership in the millions. She's a writer who believes in the form that she has chosen to mine: "The mystery novel offers a world in which justice is served. Maybe not in a court of law," she has said, "but people do get their just desserts." And like Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald, Robert Parker and the John D. MacDonald—the best of her breed—she has earned new respect for that form. Her readers appreciate her buoyant style, her eye for detail, her deft hand with character, her acute social observances, and her abundant storytelling talents.

But who is the real Sue Grafton? Many of her readers think she is simply a version of her character and alter ego Kinsey Millhone. Here are Kinsey's own words in the early pages of N Is for Noose:

"So there I was barreling down the highway in search of employment and not at all fussy about what kind of work I'd take. I wanted distraction. I wanted some money, escape, anything to keep my mind off the subject of Robert Deitz. I'm not good at good-byes. I've suffered way too many in my day and I don't like the sensation. On the other hand, I'm not that good at relationships. Get close to someone and the next thing you know, you've given them the power to wound, betray, irritate, abandon you, or bore you senseless. My general policy is to keep my distance, thus avoiding a lot of unruly emotion. In psychiatric circles, there are names for people like me."

Those are sentiments that hit home for Grafton's readers. And she has said that Kinsey is herself, only younger, smarter, and thinner. But are they an apt description of Kinsey's creator? Well, she's been married to Steve Humphrey for more than twenty years. She has three kids and two grandkids. She loves cats, gardens, and good cuisine—not quite the nature-hating, fast-food loving Millhone. So: readers and reviewers beware. Never assume the author is the character in the book. Sue, who has a home in Montecito, California ("Santa Theresa") and another in Louisville, the city in which she was born and raised, is only in her imagination Kinsey Millhone -- but what a splendid imagination it is.

Biography from author website

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    1. Hometown:
      Montecito, California and Louisville, Kentucky
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 24, 1940
    2. Place of Birth:
      Louisville, Kentucky
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of Louisville, 1961
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

My name is Kinsey Millhone. I’m a private investigator, licensed by the state of California. I’m thirty-two years old, twice divorced, no kids. The day before yesterday I killed someone and the fact weighs heavily on my mind. I’m a nice person and I have a lot of friends. My apartment is small but I like living in a cramped space. I’ve lived in trailers most of my life, but lately they’ve been getting too elaborate for my taste, so now I live in one room, a "bachelorette."I don’t have pets. I don’t have houseplants. I spend a lot of time on the road and I don’t like leaving things behind. Aside from the hazards of my profession, my life has always been ordinary, uneventful, and good. Killing someone feels odd to me and I haven’t quite sorted it through. I’ve already given a statement to the police, which I initialed page by page and then signed. I filled out a similar report for the office files. The language in both documents is neutral, the terminology oblique, and neither says quite enough.

Nikki Fife first came to my office three weeks ago. I occupy one small corner of a large suite of offices that house the California Fidelity Insurance Company, for whom I once worked. Our connection now is rather loose. I do a certain number of investigations for them in exchange for two rooms with a separate entrance and a small balcony overlooking the main street of Santa Teresa. I have an answering service to pick up calls when I’m out and I keep my own books. I don’t earn a lot of money but I make ends meet.

I’d been out for most of the morning, only stopping by the office to pick up my camera. Nikki Fife was standing in the corridor outside my office door. I’d never really met her but I’d been present at her trial eight years before when she was convicted of murdering her husband, Laurence, a prominent divorce attorney here in town. Nikki was in her late twenties then, with striking white-blonde hair, dark eyes, and flawless skin. Her lean face had filled out some, probably the result of prison food with its high starch content, but she still had the ethereal look that had made the accusation of murder seem so incongruous at the time. Her hair had grown out now to its natural shade, a brown so pale that it appeared nearly colorless. She was maybe thirty-five, thirty-six, and the years at the California Institute for Women had left no visible lines.

I didn’t say anything at first; just opened the door and let her in.

"You know who I am,"she said.

"I worked for your husband a couple of times."

She studied me carefully. "Was that the extent of it?"

I knew what she meant. "I was also there in court when you were being tried,"I said. "But if you’re asking if I was involved with him personally, the answer is no. He wasn’t my type. No offense. Would you like coffee?"

She nodded, relaxing almost imperceptibly. I pulled the coffeepot from the bottom of the file cabinet and filled it from the Sparkletts water bottle behind the door. I liked it that she didn’t protest the trouble I was going to. I put in a filter paper and ground coffee and plugged in the pot. The gurgling sound was comforting, like the pump in an aquarium.

Nikki sat very still, almost as though her emotional gears had been disengaged. She had no nervous mannerisms, didn’t smoke or twist her hair. I sat down in my swivel chair.

"When were you released?"

"A week ago."

"What’s freedom feel like?"

She shrugged. "It feels good, I guess, but I can survive the other way too. Better than you’d think."

I took a small carton of half-and-half out of the little refrigerator to my right. I keep clean mugs on top and I turned one over for each of us, filling them when the coffee was done. Nikki took hers with a murmured thanks.

"Maybe you’ve heard this one before,"she went on, "but I didn’t kill Laurence and I want you to find out who did."

"Why wait this long? You could have initiated an investigation from prison and maybe saved yourself some time."

She smiled faintly. "I’ve been claiming I was innocent for years. Who’d believe me? The minute I was indicted, I lost my credibility. I want that back. And I want to know who did me in."

I had thought her eyes were dark but I could see now that they were a metallic gray. Her look was level, flattened-out, as though some interior light were growing dim. She seemed to be a lady without much hope. I had never believed she was guilty myself but I couldn’t remember what had made me so sure. She seemed passionless and I couldn’t imagine her caring enough about anything to kill.

"You want to fill me in?"

She took a sip of coffee and then set the mug on the edge of my desk.

"I was married to Laurence for four years, a little more than that. He was unfaithful after the first six months. I don’t know why it came as such a shock. Actually, that’s how I got involved with him ...when he was with his first wife, being unfaithful to her with me. There’s a sort of egotism attached to being a mistress, I suppose. Anyway, I never expected to be in her shoes and I didn’t like it much."

"According to the prosecutor, that’s why you killed him."

"Look, they needed a conviction. I was it,"she said with the first sign of energy. "I’ve just spent the last eight years with killers of one kind or another and believe me, the motive isn’t apathy. You kill people you hate or you kill in rage or you kill to get even, but you don’t kill someone you’re indifferent to. By the time Laurence died, I didn’t give a damn about him. I fell out of love with him the first time I found out about the other women. It took me a while to get it all out of my system . . ."

"And that’s what the diary was all about?"I asked.

"Sure I kept track at first. I detailed every infidelity. I listened in on phone calls. I followed him around town. Then he started being more cautious about the whole thing and I started losing interest. I just didn’t give a shit."

A flush had crept up to her cheeks and I gave her a moment to compose herself. "I know it looked like I killed him out of jealousy or rage, but I didn’t care about that stuff. By the time he died, I just wanted to get on with my own life. I was going back to school, minding my own business. He went his way and I went mine . . ."Her voice trailed off.

"Who do you think killed him?"

"I think a lot of people wanted to. Whether they did or not is another matter. I mean, I could make a couple of educated guesses but I don’t have proof of anything. Which is why I’m here."

"Why come to me?"

She flushed again slightly. "I tried the two big agencies in town and they turned me down. I came across your name in Laurence’s old Rolodex. I thought there was a certain kind of irony hiring someone he had once hired himself. I did check you out. With Con Dolan down at Homicide."

I frowned. "It was his case, wasn’t it?"

Nikki nodded. "Yes it was. He said you had a good memory. I don’t like having to explain everything from scratch."

"What about Dolan? Does he think you’re innocent?"

"I doubt it, but then again, I did my time so what’s it to him?"

I studied her for a moment. She was forthright and what she said made sense. Laurence Fife had been a difficult man. I hadn’t been all that fond of him myself. If she was guilty, I couldn’t see why she would stir it all up again. Her ordeal was over now and her so-called debt to society had been taken off the books except for whatever remaining parole she had to serve.

"Let me think about it some,"I said. "I can get in touch with you later today and let you know."

"I’d appreciate that. I do have money. Whatever it takes."

"I don’t want to be paid to rehash old business, Mrs. Fife. Even if we find out who did it, we have to make it stick and that could be tough after all this time. I’d like to check back through the files and see how it looks."

She took a manila folder out of her big leather bag. "I have some newspaper clippings. I can leave those with you if you like. That’s the number where I can be reached."

We shook hands. Hers was cool and slight but her grip was strong. "Call me Nikki. Please."

"I’ll be in touch,"I said.

I had to go take some photographs of a crack in a sidewalk for an insurance claim and I left the office shortly after she did, taking my VW out the freeway. I like my cars cramped and this one was filled with files and law books, a briefcase where I keep my little automatic, cardboard boxes, and a case of motor oil given to me by a client. He’d been cheated by two con artists who had "allowed"him to invest two grand in their oil company. The motor oil was real enough but it wasn’t theirs; just some Sears thirty-weight with new labels pasted on. It had taken me a day and a half to track them down. In addition to the junk, I keep a packed overnight case back there, too, for God knows what emergency. I wouldn’t work for anyone who wanted me that fast. It just makes me feel secure to have a nightgown, toothbrush, and fresh underwear at hand. I have my little quirks I guess. The VW’s a ’68, one of those vague beige models with assorted dents. It needs a tune-up but I never have time.

I thought about Nikki as I drove. I had tossed the manila folder full of clippings on the passenger seat but I really didn’t need to look at them. Laurence Fife had done a lot of divorce work and he had a reputation as a killer in court. He was cold, methodical, and unscrupulous, taking any advantage he could. In California, as in many states, the only grounds for divorce are irreconcilable differences or incurable insanity, which eliminates the trumped-up adultery charges that were the mainstay of divorce attorneys and private eyes in the old days. There is still the question of property settlements and custody—money and children—and Laurence Fife could get his clients anything. Most of them were women. Out of court, he had a reputation as a killer of another kind and the rumor was that he had mended many a broken heart in that difficult period between interlocutory and final decrees.

I had found him shrewd, nearly humorless, but exact; an easy man to work for because his instructions were clear and he paid in advance. A lot of people apparently hated him: men for the price he extracted, women for the betrayal of their trust. He was thirty-nine years old when he died. That Nikki was accused, tried, and convicted was just a piece of bad luck. Except for cases that clearly involve a homicidal maniac, the police like to believe murders are committed by those we know and love, and most of the time they’re right—a chilling thought when you sit down to dinner with a family of five. All those potential killers passing their plates.

As nearly as I could remember, Laurence Fife had been having drinks with his law partner, Charlie Scorsoni, the night of his murder. Nikki was at a meeting of the Junior League. She got home before Laurence, who arrived about midnight. He was taking medication for numerous allergies and before he went to bed, he downed his usual capsule. Within two hours, he was awake—nauseated, vomiting, doubled over with violent stomach cramps. By morning, he was dead. An autopsy and lab tests showed that he’d died as a result of ingesting oleander, ground to a fine powder and substituted for the medication in the capsule he took: not a masterly plot, but one employed to good effect. Oleander is a common California shrub. There was one in the Fife’s backyard as a matter of fact. Nikki’s fingerprints were found on the vial along with his. A diary was discovered among her possessions, certain entries detailing the fact that she’d found out about his adulteries and was bitterly angry and hurt, contemplating divorce. The District Attorney established quite nicely that no one divorced Laurence Fife without penalty. He’d been married and divorced once before and though another attorney had handled his case, his impact was evident. He obtained custody of his children and he managed to come out ahead financially. The state of California is scrupulous in its division of assets, but Laurence Fife had a way of maneuvering monies so that even a fifty-fifty split gave him the lion’s share. It looked as if Nikki Fife knew better than to try disentangling herself from him legally and had sought other means.

She had motive. She had access. The grand jury heard the evidence and returned an indictment. Once she got into court, it was simply a question of who could persuade twelve citizens of what. Apparently the D.A. had done his homework. Nikki hired Wilfred Brentnell from Los Angeles: a legal whiz with a reputation as the patron saint of lost causes. In some sense, it was almost like admitting her guilt. The whole trial had a sensational air. Nikki was young. She was pretty. She was born with money. The public was curious and the town was small. It was all too good to miss.

Excerpted from A Is For Alibi by Sue Grafton.

Copyright © 1982 by Sue Grafton.

Published in November 2005 by St. Martin’s Press.

All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 407 )
Rating Distribution

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(117)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 409 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Ending/Page Turner

    I am finishing this on the first day of 2011. This book was written in 1982 and it is nice to read something that is modern, but before the convenience of cellphones. I am planning to continue with the series and I am interested how Kinsey Millhone will age. Right now she is in the era of answering services (Google it) and $19.99 hotels. You have to read the book as a period piece if you are young.
    It is a really great mystery that had a lot of red herrings. I was fooled more than once. There's one suspect telling complete lies, a few not "telling the whole truth", and a witness not willing to tell what they saw. Kinsey has to sift though all that. I'm like a sponge believing all the half-truths and only thinking I knew the murderer by almost halfway through. I was way wrong. The fourth line of the book, Grafton tells you she shot someone and the rest of the book is what lead up to it. Make sure your sitting down when you read the ending.

    16 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 7, 2011

    Well worth the read!

    I purchased this book on a whim. I didn't have a lot of expectations, just wanted a quick read for the airport. Needless to say I devoured this book and quickly started on the next. Before I was halfway through the next I had already purchased C, D, E and F. I am not always fond of female lead characters, maybe because they are not always portrayed in a favorable light. But Kinsey could be me or one of my sisters or friends. I am definitely glad that I followed that whim because it lead me to a great character and some great reading.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A is for astounding!!!

    "My name is Kinsey Millhone. I'm a private investigator, licensed by the state of California, I'm thirty-two years old, twice divorced, no kids. I don't have pets, I don't have houseplants I spent a lot of time on the road and I don't like leaving things behind. Aside from the dangers of my profession my life has always been ordinary, uneventful and good. I meet most people in the course of my work, and if I can't get emotionally involved there, then where else can I go? P.I. is my whole life, most of the time I'm alone, but why not? I'm not unhappy and I'm not discontented" K. Millhone.
    A is for Alibi, A is for astounding!
    In the first installation of the Millhone franchise, Grafton sets the tone at its highest for what is to be one of the few mystery series that has aged well for almost three decades.
    In A is for Alibi, P.I. Kinsey Millhone's character takes a life of her own, and connects with the readers in the first paragraph. Grafton does a brilliant job developing Kinsey as a main character of this story, and in the process she manages to create all the secondary characters: Libby Glass, Charlie Scorsoni, Gwen Fife, Sharon Napier, Lyle Abernathy and Marcia Threadgill among others that give this novel the esense to make it original and likable.

    In the first installment, Grafton's first attempt to captivate readers is a triumph, the plot is simple, Nikki Fife was convicted of killing her husband eight years ago, now on parole she hires P.I. Kinsey Millhone to find the real killer. And as Kinsey brainstorms to find the killer it becomes more difficult than she tough it was " From the first, this has been a case where motive and alibi where oddidly overlapped. Alibi: An account of the suspect's whereabouts at the time a crime has been committed and is offered up as a proof of innocence. But here it didn't matter where anyone was, it only matter if someone had a REASON to have someone else dead, access to the victim and intent to kill" A is for Alibi is a journey that takes Kinsey to cross path with a genuine cast of characters and showcases Grafton's magnificent writing style and originality for her novels.

    Having taken place in the early eighties and introducing Kinsey, investigating a cold case murder, overlapped with an insurance fraud claim makes her job more difficult, but Graftons is at ease in her efortless writing. As a result, Kinsey shines throughout the whole story.
    A is for Alibi is great because it just doesn't introduce a great character, Kinsey Millhone, but also welcomes Grafton's series of novels as a writer. In the Millhone's series opening act- Grafton- "looks at society, murderers, and those who commit minor crimes whose motivation is less, but all beyond greed. The new standards of morality and how we judge people based on them, and most important, the notion of justice that justifies the need for revenge and payment of old debts."
    A is for Albi is written in a simple tone, yet Grafton takes nothing for granted, a page turner. Great story, well written plot with twists, turns and an exceptional and shocking ending.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 29, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    great

    really liked this book. this was my first book by Sue Grafton. It was different than the other books I've read before, but great nonetheless

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 27, 2011

    New to the mystery book series

    And Sue Grafton's series as well as a few other authors were recommended as good reads for getting started. I agree with the positive folks on here in saying that her detail to the detective work is well done and if some of the reporting is unrealistic well it is fiction. Another book is more on the financial side of mysterious but it's a book called Deadly Portfolio: A Killing in Hedge Funds by Jon J. Hohn. Just like Grafton the pages turn and the stories behind the people and blending of families is fabulous. So far I'm enjoying this genre.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2011

    Very good book

    I can't believe I have never read any of Sue Grafton's books. Kept you guessing until the end. I will be reading more of her books.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2011

    Exciting..at the end

    It seemed like forever before the book became a "page turner". Also, too many characters to keep straight.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 27, 2011

    Enjoyable Book

    The first quarter of the book was a bit boring in my opinion. I felt the author spent too much time and space describing little unimportant things. After that it picked up and was very interesting. I suspected every character was the murderer and had no idea who it really was until the end, which I loved by the way. I even started enjoying the way she described everything. I was very anxious at the end. Also I started comparing the main character to myself. The characters were well depicted, though I have to admit I had a little trouble remembering who certain characters were, but I think that was just because there were a lot of characters. In the end, I very much enjoyed it and I would recommend it to anyone who likes the genre. I look forward to reading the rest of the series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 16, 2013

    Read this years ago and enjoyed it just as much this time. A gr

    Read this years ago and enjoyed it just as much this time. A great mystery with an ending that took me by surprise. Set in the 1980's. Refreshing look at a time before cell phones or other high-tech devices. Great character development. As with all mysteries, she tends to refer to characters by either just their first or last name. This can get a bit confusing unless you pay close attention to the full name of each character as it is introduced. Sue Grafton incorporates a bit of humor into her stories which helps keep a balance between the light and dark aspects of the story. I've read every book in Kinsey Milhone series and it's definitely worth the read. Many of the characters are in the follow-up stories as well. When you begin reading each subsequent book in this series, you feel as if you're visiting old friends.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2013

    Happy I was able to delve into this series at "A"! Now, I'm up to and very happy with "D"!

    I plan to read the entire series. The "Lady Detective" hero is believable and interesting. Plenty of gum-shoe endeavor that helps me stay in step and kind of solve the mystery along with her. I admit to formerly having hang-ups with a "female" perspective. That's not evident at all with kinsey.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2011

    Interesting, easy read, somewhat dated, simplistic story line

    It's just ok

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2011

    Sue grafton

    This is great book. Sue Grafton is great at puttiing in great details to keep story flowing

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 15, 2013

    fine book

    1st I've read in the series. Liked it can't wait to get to the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    Good book

    Inspired me to keep reading the next letter book. Just about ready to finish the D book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    Good Read!

    This was a most entertaining story with enough twists and turns to keep you guessing as to who committed a murder. It was a real bonus to have it done with quite a sense of humor. I always looked forward to my time of day to sit down and find out "whodunit"!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2013

    I finally diod it.

    Sue Grafton. I have been seeing her books since the beginning but somehow never picked one up...always curious to see whether they were THAT good or not. I guess i was determined to start with the first one...but i always saw the next in the series over the years. I am a bit of an invalid, so there is that too. BUT, thanks to my NOOK! I found this book and now I've read it and am completely satisfied. It was fun to read and I liked Kinsey pretty well, altho i dont completely understand her yet. Onto "B is for..."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2013

    A is for Alibi

    I've enjoyed Sue Grafton books.

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  • Posted September 13, 2013

    Great book

    Great book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2013

    OK

    Moves along okay - I am only about 80 pages in to it right now - don't get too much chance to read. Nook is very convenient to carry around though. Story line ok, though nothing spectacular.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    I am a pretty fast reader so when I find a book I enjoy, I usual

    I am a pretty fast reader so when I find a book I enjoy, I usually read several books by the author. The Kinsey Millhone mysteries are no exception and with a whole alpahbet to read through, I have plenty to look forward to. Can't wait to find out what Kinsey gets into next.

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