A Journey: The Autobiography of Apolo Anton Ohno

Overview

I honestly don't know what battles I'm going to face next, only that I have the spirit and the will to face anything and fight for my sport and for what I believe is right. I'll give 110 percent and still dig down deeper for more.

Apolo Anton Ohno won both a gold and a silver medal at the 2002 Olympic Games and became an instant hero. But his Olympic victory represents just one moment of his incredible, and continuing journey.

From an early ...

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Overview

I honestly don't know what battles I'm going to face next, only that I have the spirit and the will to face anything and fight for my sport and for what I believe is right. I'll give 110 percent and still dig down deeper for more.

Apolo Anton Ohno won both a gold and a silver medal at the 2002 Olympic Games and became an instant hero. But his Olympic victory represents just one moment of his incredible, and continuing journey.

From an early age, his father, Yuki, recognized Apolo's natural abilities and made it his mission to help his son live up to his potential. But getting Apolo to follow through on his opportunities wasn't always easy. Like many kids, Apolo struggled to balance his energetic and fiercely competitive nature with his desire for independence and freedom.

And even as he succeeded on the ice, he felt the loneliness that comes with being at the top. Amid the pain, the fear, the uncertainty, Apolo asked himself again and again, Why am I doing this? And the answer came to him: He truly loved to skate. So with laser-sharp focus he pursued his number-one goal: to become a great athlete.

From his personal struggles to his unwavering commitment and ambition, Apolo Anton Ohno is a true example of courage. He has battled his personal demons, toppled physical barriers, and clawed his way to the top -- but even now he does not rest. Always, he looks within himself to hear his strongest critic, to face his fiercest competitor. And always, he continues to strive to be the best -- not just for his team, not just for his country -- but also for himself. And that is what makes Apolo Anton Ohno a true champion. This is his story.

The autobiography of the controversial young American who won gold and silver medals in speed skating at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

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Editorial Reviews

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In an autobiography that's as sharp and fast-paced as the speed skates on his feet, Apolo Anton Ohno tells his story, discussing subjects like his younger days in Seattle, his most cherished heroes, and his medal-winning races at the 2002 Winter Olympics. Ohno lays it all on the line, revisiting, for example, his admitted blow-off of his U.S. Junior National Development Team training in Lake Placid ("Then he [Ohno's dad] made a mistake...he said good-bye, told me I'd be okay, and left me to board the plane alone. I had never planned to get on that flight.") and his strong opinions about the controversy surrounding him at the 2002 Olympic Trials. Along with detailed accounts of racing events in which he participated, the gold and silver medalist discusses his close relationship with his dad, his perspectives on different coaching techniques, and his reaction to being in the media limelight. A focused book that includes winning themes about perseverance, goals, sportsmanship, and hope, A Journey will have even more young fans seeing this sports star as a hero in the same league as Michael Jordan or Mark McGwire.
Publishers Weekly
Ohno, an Olympic gold medalist for short track speed skating, may have been one of the hottest stars of the 2002 Winter Games, but this disjointed, poorly executed account of his career may leave readers cold. At the outset of his journey, 19-year-old Ohno gushes about some of his idols-Lance Armstrong, Muhammad Ali-and confesses his hope that he can become a similarly positive role model for kids. But the narrative, as it chronicles Ohno's rise to an elite level in athletics, is rambling and often repetitious-paragraphs from the prologue are reproduced verbatim later in the book, without apparent reason; Ohno's frequent praise of his father and supportive friends, doctors and coaches takes on the enumerative quality of many award-acceptance speeches. Many teens will relate to Ohno's personal struggles as well as his rebellious attitude and to the clashes he has had with authority on the road to greatness. But unfortunately, the co-authors fail to convey much realistic emotion nor do they capture the you-are-there excitement of this fast-paced sport. Includes an eight-page inset of color photos. Ages 12-up. (Oct.) FYI: Also available from the same publisher is a scrapbook approach for younger fans, All About Apolo! by Joe Layden, with a selection of snapshots from Ohno family albums. (S&S/Aladdin, $5.99 paper 32p ages 9-14 ISBN 0-689-85610-5; Aug.)
VOYA
Olympic medallist Ohno recounts the many ups and downs of his adolescent years as he defied convention to master a sport, doing it his way. Through sheer determination and mind-numbing workouts, he skyrocketed up the ranks of short track skating while also facing many personal demons. Ohno's "single-dad" father sacrificed for years to finance training camps and trips to regional tournaments, wanting just to be there for his son, even through the bouts with rebellion and bad attitude. Ohno endured poor coaching, loneliness, a recurring flu, and back injuries on his way to the top. This book has a lot going for it. It provides an excellent descriptive account of the sport, its strategies and dangers. It is also reflective of Ohno's offhand style, full of teen lingo, boasting, and sports-related clichés, such as "giving 110%." Ohno is a likeable subject, and readers will appreciate his honesty about his worst times, his dedication to the sport, and his personal quest for a spiritual side. Richardson also assisted Monica Seles, Shannon Miller, and several other sports figures in their biographies. The breezy style and blow-by-blow descriptions of fierce competition and controversies surrounding the Olympic games will appeal to all sports fans. Photos. VOYA CODES: 3Q 3P M J S (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2002, Simon & Schuster, 160p,
— Kevin Beach
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-This autobiography of the youngest U.S. athlete to win a World Cup is engaging, informative, and well written. The opening chapter begins with Ohno's bout with the flu four days before the Salt Lake City Olympics, and with him wondering how he is going to be able to compete. He then describes the competitions and events on his journey to his success, his determination and motivation, and the key people who helped to shape his life and his work ethic. He talks about the setbacks-serious injuries, people who did not have his best interests in mind-before bringing the story full circle back to the 2002 Olympics, where he won a gold medal for short track skating. The tone throughout is informal and casual. Eight pages of good-quality, color photographs show Ohno at various stages in his life. Readers interested in skating and sports competition, and those looking for true success stories, will enjoy this account of one young man's failures, challenges, and successes.-Janice C. Hayes, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689856082
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 9/20/2002
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 160
  • Age range: 12 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.26 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue

Tussling Whales

Just for Fun

The Boogeyman

Thousands of Miles Away

The Rock

Revival

Concentration

Dislocation-Reorientation-Celebration

Climbing the Mountain

Speedbump

Haters

Silver, Rounding the Last Corner

Gold

Epilogue

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First Chapter

Chapter 2: Just for Fun

My favorite book as a child was Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss. I liked the idea of the stubborn critter in a tall droopy black hat refusing to eat those nasty green eggs and ham. He just couldn't be tricked or bribed -- and he wouldn't eat them on a train, or in a house, or with a mouse. In my imagination I was that stubborn critter -- wily and too smart to try green food. When I was a kid, I wouldn't do anything I didn't want to do...unless my dad insisted. And still, I found ways around him.


My entire skating career started for fun. When I was seven years old, my father would take me to the roller-skating rink every Thursday after school. It was an enormous rink crowded with tons of kids and video games, which I didn't get into until much later. There were kids who went to the rink just to play the games and never even skated. But I'd get out there on my quad skates (two wheels in the front, two in the back) and skate as fast as I could. I loved speed and right away I wanted to race. My father was game.

My first quad race was in Lynwood, Washington, and I got second place. Man, I hated it! My dad was proud and the trophy was pretty tight -- a little pop can that I thought was cool. But I hadn't won and I was a little kid and upset. Defeat has never come easily to me. Meanwhile, other kids in the sport were practicing six days a week. I'd just go to the rink, skate as fast as I could for a few hours, goof around with my buddies, and then go home. Both my father and I looked upon roller-skating as recreational.

I continued to swim, and by the time I was twelve, I'd won the state championship in breaststroke. My father still had visions of Stanford, but I was starting to hate swim practice -- the redundancy of laps, cold water, and long hours of muscle-numbing freestyle, backstroke, butterfly, and breaststroke. I liked skating more than the pool. I joined a local rink in Auburn, Washington. John Guftason, the owner, was a laid-back guy who didn't really coach but cared about each kid.

When I first saw in-line skates (four wheels in a straight line) I had to get a pair. My dad, who saw how fast I already was, and how much I loved skating, agreed. At my first race, I was the only kid using in-line skates. I beat everyone easily because you glide more on in-lines and they're just faster. I felt like I'd cheated. After that race all those other kids started using in-lines. For the next two years my father drove me to every race we could possibly attend. He had a little brown Volkswagen Rabbit. It looked like it had no paint on it and had rusted into its brownish color.

My dad had crazy endurance and he used to drive all night, even through blinding snowstorms, to get me to a race when I was too young to drive. I remember waking up in the middle of a storm on our way to Springfield, Missouri, and my dad's hair and face were soaking wet. When I asked why, he said not to worry, he had been trying to get us out of a ditch. He had skidded off the road and after attempting to push us out, he'd decided to rock the tiny car back and forth until he had enough momentum to get over the snowbank. He did, but then the highway out of Denver was closed.

We traveled winding back roads in a car without four-wheel drive through snow that fell so hard you couldn't see a foot in front of the windshield, and we made it to Missouri at 2 A.M. Dad had gotten us to the race on time by driving twenty hours straight. Crazy-crazy-crazy!

Sometimes my dad would go to work at the salon all day, then get in the car and drive through the night while I slept in the back. There were close calls -- a competition in Michigan where my dad forgot the time change and the judges were scratching my name off the roster as we ran into the arena. We weren't rich so there weren't many plane flights, but we made it work because my dad believed it was his job to get me to competitions.

My days were filled with morning practices in the pool, school, and then skating in the afternoon. When the media writes that I spent my childhood as a latchkey kid, I just have to laugh. Yes, my dad worked long hours at his salon and I made my own dinners from food he bought and organized for me (lasagna, spaghetti, chicken, and burgers), but I wasn't sitting at home watching TV and eating chips. I had an insane amount of energy as a kid, and when I wasn't swimming or skating, I was riding my bike, playing football with friends, or outside just messing around.


My thirteenth year ended with a large local club competition. The grand finale was a 3000-meter race with all age groups skating together. I'd skated against the senior guys and always did well, but I didn't think I had a chance to place. Still, it meant a lot to me to do well. I remember skating as hard as I could, rounding a corner and suddenly feeling a huge push from behind. One of the seniors, KC, who is now a long tracker, had given me a push so that I could go faster.

KC was much older and could have easily beaten me, but he saw how hard I was trying and wanted to help. He was a cool cat then and he still is today. I came in second and I was super happy. KC probably doesn't even remember the race -- he was doing long track by then and his in-line skating was pretty much over. It's strange how a single, important moment in one person's life might not even be memorable to another.

In 1996 I turned fourteen -- the magical year my dad and I watched short track skating for the first time. It was the Albertville Olympics and all I remember is thinking about how fast (up to thirty-five miles per hour) the skaters circled the rink. My dad was captivated too.

Short track originated in Europe more than a hundred years ago. By 1906 skaters in the United States began to take part in competitions and by the 1920s crowds would fill Madison Square Garden in Manhattan to watch the U.S. and Canada short track skaters race. They saw what I saw in 1994 -- speed, sharp blades, tight corners, and the threat of contact and falls. After World War II Europeans and the Far East began to catch on to the sport. It was a demonstration event in the 1988 Olympics and in 1994 became a full Olympic sport.

Today there are four official short track Olympic events. The 500-meters is a sprint, the 1000-meters is a midlength race, the 1500-meters is an endurance race, and the 5000-meter relay is a team race. In the 5000- each team is made of four members who can trade off at any time, in any order, by touch or push. Changeovers usually happen when successors pick up speed in the inner zone and then move onto the track at the perfect moment to get a push from behind. Only one skater can skate the final two laps. It's a brutally long race, the ice gets chewed up, and by the last few laps it's hard to hold an edge in the turns. Another event, which is not part of the Olympics but demands similar endurance to the 5000-meters, is the individual 3000-meters that is raced at the national and international competitions.

Short track skaters skate indoors on a 111-meter track. There are four to six skaters in each event and we race against each other, not the clock. Nine- and four-lap time trials are used in national competitions to cull the top sixteen skaters from the rest of the pack, and also as part of a point system that gets added to individual tallies given for finishing each race. Time is used only to mark speed records. Measured to the inches, there are seven rubber cones called "blocks," set up on each side of the course and they mark the turns. When the starting signal goes off, skaters sprint for the first turn and establish their positions. If you're in front you don't have to use energy to pass other skaters, but there's no one to draft off (skate behind to decrease wind resistance) so it's more tiring.

Speed skating isn't just about endurance and who can go faster. There's a lot of technique in holding your blade through a turn; deciding when to pass another skater; or choosing to stay in the back, draft, and wait for a gap or chance to pass. Skaters can also be disqualified for charging off the starting line, inside impeding (passing on the left) and outside impeding (causing interference while passing on the right). Additionally, the referees can DQ a skater for cross-tracking, which means cutting in front of another skater and impeding their progress. It's unusual to fall and still win a race because the turns are sharp, the track is small, and once you hit the padded walls of the rink you're usually out of the game.

Refereeing short track skating is a tough job. Things happen so fast and sometimes rulings appear more subjective than factual. Skaters know when they've done something wrong, but anything can happen in short track and usually does. And since there are preliminary rounds, quarterfinals, semifinals, and finals in most major competitions, it's tough to count on smooth races without problems. People got the chance to see it at the Olympics. It's what makes the sport of short track so tough and fulfilling.


It's hard to believe I had the time to pick up a new sport, but after the 1994 Olympics I just had to learn how to do short track. "Santa" brought me a pair of speed skates for Christmas, but I didn't know how to use them. My dad asked around and found out that there was a short track club in Eugene, Oregon. We drove down five hours to Eugene for my first race. I had never been on skates or the ice before that day.

This is another example of the kindness of others not being forgotten. When I stepped onto the ice, I really thought I could easily make the switch from in-line skates to short track. I soon found that my biggest problem was gliding. All of the other skaters were effortlessly circling the rink and I wasn't going anywhere. I was pushing and sweating and my dad was looking down from the stands with a puzzled expression on his face. He thought that maybe I just needed to keep circling to break in the blades.

Finally another skater stopped beside me. "You have to sharpen your skates," he said.

"What do you mean?"

"When they're new, the edges are serrated. You sharpen them until the ridges are gone so you can glide."

"Oh...right."

I didn't know anything about my equipment. Skate blades (from twelve to eighteen inches in length depending on your height, body weight, foot size, and technical ability) are made from a bimetal, which isn't two metals, but one that has two different hardnesses. Then there's the bend. The bend for a blade is unique for each athlete. It's usually a smooth arc that follows the directional bend in the corner of the skating track. Bends can increase stability and help with tight turns, but they're less efficient in the straightaways.

The rocker is the most technical aspect of blades and is usually the reason a skater feels "off" at practice or a competition. The rocker is the curvature of the bottom of the blade, and it's usually a constant radius with the high point at the middle of the blade. Every time you sharpen your skates, you can slightly alter the rocker. A skater has to know what feels right, what feels wrong, and eventually learn how to fix it himself or find a great mechanical coach who is extremely talented at making almost imperceptible changes to the blades. Usually it's a combination of a skater and their coach because it's so difficult to make a skate perfect.

I didn't know any of these things during my first short track race in Eugene. I also had never heard of the concept of the offset. A blade is offset on a boot, meaning the blade is moved slightly to the left to allow skaters to lean farther in their turns without the left side of their boot contacting the ice, which can result in a fall. Offsetting is a way to counter the strong centrifugal force that acts on skaters in tight turns by using their bodies' lean. Every athlete uses a different amount of offset, which can increase speed and performance if it feels good.


After I sharpened my blades during the Eugene competition, I thought they were perfect. But there was a little girl who still beat me three times. Blond hair, a ponytail, a satisfied grin. I was so pissed off and tired and she made it look so easy. I started to copy her style and beat her the last race. I never fell that first day, but I left the rink thinking that short track was freezing compared to the warm rinks of in-line, and that I had a lot to learn.

Dad and I started to drive up to Vancouver, British Columbia on the weekends because short track is much bigger in Canada. There were competitions held at a local rink during the winter, it was a shorter drive than to Eugene, and there were strong skaters up there to learn from and watch. I didn't have a coach, so those weekends were practice, training, and competition for me. Dad had been taping swim meets for years, so he brought his camera up to BC and taped each event. During the weeks I'd watch the tapes and try to learn from my mistakes and others' successes.

What I remember most was how smooth skating began to feel. Smooth and quiet. There was another nice change too. None of the skaters in BC talked "trash." Everyone talks trash at in-line competitions...everyone. "You gonna give me this race, right? You're not going to take this race from me, 'cause you know you're tired from the last race." They think they're so good and it's hilarious and I loved it. I was right in there, talking smack and trying to intimidate with the best. But in short track no one talks like that...no one. When I first made the switch the other skaters looked at me like I was insane and I learned pretty quickly to keep quiet.

I also learned how to improve, got faster, and started to really compete, but still didn't know much about technique or taking care of my own equipment. In January 1996 I came out of nowhere at the U.S. Junior World Championship Trials and placed fourth overall. I actually could have skated even better, but during the 1000-meter race I was in third and made a bad pass, bumping one of the top guys. I felt so badly about it because I was a "nobody" who wasn't going to make the team so I told myself to go back to the pack (my own punishment) and I just hung there until the end of the race.


I was crazy nervous during that junior trials competition. In hindsight there wasn't much pressure. I was just a fourteen-year-old kid and there were no expectations of me going in. There was no bull's-eye on my back like there is today, and it's always easier not to be targeted. There were no young guys shooting for me and looking at my weaknesses as if I was in a fishbowl being followed by piranhas.

I really respect guys like Marc Gagnon, a Canadian skater out of Montreal who's been on top for almost ten years, is a four-time World Overall Champion, and won a gold in the 1998 Olympics as part of the men's relay team. During his six peak-performance years he never came in less than second place. He is consistently the guy to beat, but he's maintained his edge even though everyone is looking to dust him. It's harder to be on top than to be the underdog -- any competitor can tell you that. It's harder and lonelier to be on top, and the pressure can be exhausting.

I miss the old days sometimes, when I'd go to a competition and make a friend like Shani Davis. Shani's from Chicago and he was the 1500-meter Junior World Champion, and the first American to make two junior world teams (short and long track) in one year. More recently he was first overall at the 2000 U.S. Junior Short Track Championships; first overall at the 2001 U.S. Junior Long Track Championships; and a qualifier for the 2002 Olympic Team.

Until Shani, I didn't have many friends on the short track circuit. They both feared me because I had a background as an in-liner that gave me great endurance, and disliked me because I'd come over from in-line and a lot of short trackers look down on that sport. Neither Shani nor I were good enough at the time to care about any of that. We were young and we wanted to have fun, eat tons of candy before races, and listen to rap music.


Of course, you know what happens at the end of Green Eggs and Ham, right? Sam finally convinces the critter in the tall black hat to try the food. Exasperated, he does...and discovers he actually likes green eggs and ham. Unfortunately, life doesn't always mirror children's books. At the end of 1996 a single phone call changed my fate. As a result, I was forced to give in to my father's wishes, which led to unforgettable battles and a short-lived rift between us. I had no tricks to pull out of my hat, except the determination to make everyone around me miserable.


Eventually my dad's decision would start my journey toward fulfillment and happiness...but at age fourteen, I didn't know that. And I didn't know that the decision to hate something before I'd even tried it was as simplistic as the story I'd loved as a kid, and that if I wanted to pursue my dreams, I'd have to grow up.

Copyright © 2002 by Apolo Anton Ohno

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2004

    Apolo is an Amazing Person with an Amazing Father!

    Apolo and his father are real, hardworking and charmingly down-to-earth and humble. Apolo is extremely talented and faces all the temptations of a modern teenager for short-term gratification and peer acceptance that could have led him nowhere, but his single-father's parenting supports Apolo to make the right choices and achieve long-term greatness, as an Olympian and a person!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2003

    Wow..

    I'm sorry to inform you that this isn't a review for this book...But I previosly wrote a review under the name of Tim Woo..I did not agree with the other critics and followed all of your guidelines..Yet I do not see my review...A couple of weeks have passed... and I'm sad to say the class i'm attending at my school, Independent Survey of Literature, will no longer be able to use your site because of your bias towards the author that you seem to show...This book was not good in any way...Thats my opinion.. and you refuse to let it spoil your perfect five star rating for this book...I can say that I have little respect for a supposed open minded site that voices their customer's opinions...All i can say is that i'm dissappointed...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2002

    Apolo Ohno is a Righteous Writer

    This book written by Apolo Anton Ohno was excellently written.It tells about his journey to the TOP.He immediately got me hooked and I soon felt myself experiencing tragedy and victory right along with him.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2002

    THIS IS OFFICIALLY MY FAVORITE BOOK!!!!

    OMG!!! this book is so cool!!! It is now officially my favorite book!!! I LOVE THIS BOOK!!! i'm sure all u apolo fans will love it too. it is written by him...the one and onlee apolo!!! apolo's a very good writer. it also has pictures in the middle of the book. so....what r u waiting for?!?!.........GO GET THIS BOOK!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2002

    Journey of an American Champion

    This is an inspirational book I would highly recommend for individuals of all ages. Apolo Ohno's physical and emotional trials were even more intense than I realized prior to reading this book. Media interviews and articles only gave the public brief glimpses of what he has endured to become a champion in his sport. Personally, I didn't grasp the magnitude of his journey until I read his own words. This is a compelling story about a young man who continues to strive for excellence in his sport and in his own character!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2002

    Chapter 2

    That one chapter was pretty good, and I can't wait to read the rest! I know everyone probably already knows the life story of Apolo, but this is coming right from his own words!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2002

    Great determination

    This book shows us, the fans, that his JOURNEY has been a long and hard one for such a young man. It also shows us that his JOURNEY is far from over. He has achieved everything through pain and hard work. He is one athlete to be admired. I think every young man should read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2002

    Apolo has landed

    Apolo does a good job on describing his memorible experiences. I liked the way he tied in things he learned from the past in to his adulthood to learn and become a better person. When Apolo writes I can hear him speaking, as if he is speaking from his soul.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2002

    Apolo is so incredible!!

    I didn't think I could admire and adore this amazing young man any morethan I already did, but I do after reading his amazing story. What an extraordinary character he has. No wonder so many fell in love with him during the Olympics, when we saw his class, his grace and maturity and the awesome sportsmanship he displayed for all the world to see. What a wonderful role model for kids he is. He is as beautiful on the inside as he is on the outside and this book should be in every school library. If even one young person is inspired by his story to overcome whatever obstacle to achieve their goals, then it would be worth having. Thank you, Apolo, for all the pleasure and heartwarming feelings you have given and continue to give to your fans. We truly adore you and anyone who reads this book will see why. If they are not a fan before reading it, they cannot help but be one afterward.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2002

    Avid Reader; Houston, TX

    This book gave excellent insight into Apolo's frame of mind during the 2002 Olympics, his love for his sport, his relationship with his father, and his positive attitude on life. I would definitely recommend this autobiography!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2002

    Young Man Rising

    Writing from the heart is not easy, but Apolo Ohno has never shirked the hard tasks. Those of us who raised "rebellious" teenage sons will recognize the trials, empathize with Yuki Ohno, and hope that our own children will rise with such grace and courage to Life's challenges. Apolo writes without bitterness for the difficulties, and gratitude for those who have helped make him an Olympic gold/silver medal winner. And Yuki Ohno shows us what a true father really is. This book is not just for children, but for anyone who wants to know what it takes to become a champion, on or off the ice.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2002

    APOLO'S JOURNEY TO BECOME THE BEST IN THE WORLD

    Apolo shares his struggles,downfalls,and victories in his journey to become the fastest shorttrack speedskater ever. This is a beautiful story of a beautiful person and is told from the heart. A great book for teens and all ages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2002

    A Journey is AWESOME!

    Everyone must read this moving and inspiring book. While Apolo's words are engagingly kid-like and candid, the thoughts, reflections, and insights they describe are brilliant, deep, and soulful, with a wisdom and maturity far beyond his 19 years. The gracious, generous spirit we all loved and admired at the 2002 Olympics is in every word of this autobiography--you will smile, you will cry, you will be filled with even greater admiration and even deeper respect for Apolo after reading his Journey.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2002

    THE BOOK IS PHENOMENAL - AND SO IS HE!!

    Do not miss this book! It is a must have! If you want details about his childhood and teen years - it's here. If you want details about his training - it's here. If you want details about the Olympics - it's here. And if you want nice, juicy, previously untold personal details - it's here, too! No matter what your age, this book is BOTH INFORMATIONAL AND INSPIRATIONAL. It doesn't get any better than this! Order 2 copies - 1 to read and cherish + 1 to drool on! Buy it now and run to the checkout!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2002

    Entertaining reading for fans of all ages!

    I loved this book. Apolo is so dedicated to his sport. He has had some debilitating injuries and fought back like the true warrior he is. His relationship with his father is so very special. If you are not a fan of his now you will be after you read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2002

    Incredible Journey

    If you are a fan of Apolo Anton Ohno, you will want this book. If you are not a fan yet, you will be once you've read his story. What an amazing and incredible young man....and for all the pain and hardships he endured for the love of his sport just to make it to the Olympics and perform well, which he did.....Apolo Anton Ohno is an inspiration and a role model that I as a parent would certainly point my children to. We saw just a glimpse of his beautiful spirit and impeccable character during the Olympics when he showed the world what class and sportsmanship really are. A very mature 19 year old is what we saw...and he made us proud at a time when we needed our spirits lifted.Apolo is as beautiful on the inside as he is on the outside...if you want proof of that, just buy his book and read his incredible story. I can't wait to read about his next journey.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2002

    It's cool

    I think that just one chapter was pretty good because it gets me to realize that your not embarrest to show your life story which you shouldn't be because yours is better than what my life is going through right now!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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