A Journey North: One woman's story of hiking the Appalachian Trail

A Journey North: One woman's story of hiking the Appalachian Trail

by Adrienne Hall
     
 

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Hiking 2,159 miles from Georgia to Maine was not my idea...I was not a lost youth searching for an identity. I was not retired and looking for a new way to spend my time. I was not sorting through death or divorce. I was not recently fired from a job. The truth is, my boyfriend asked me on a date. So begins the story of one young woman's journey along the legendary

Overview

Hiking 2,159 miles from Georgia to Maine was not my idea...I was not a lost youth searching for an identity. I was not retired and looking for a new way to spend my time. I was not sorting through death or divorce. I was not recently fired from a job. The truth is, my boyfriend asked me on a date. So begins the story of one young woman's journey along the legendary Appalachian Trail. What starts as a date turns into the experience of a lifetime as Adrienne Hall faces blinding snowstorms, flooded rivers, and seemingly endless mountaintops. Yet despite the physical and mental hardships, she finds her commitment to her hiking companion and the AT experience growing with every mile. When she emerges from her trip - a million footsteps, countless candy bars, and one engagement proposal later - Adrienne has lived an adventure that few will ever know. Written with warmth, insight, and a keen sense of observation, A Journey North is a personal story about discovering what it means to hike the amazing corridor of wilderness that is the Appalachian Trail. (6 x 9 1/4, 224 pages, case bound)

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
Asked on a "date" by her boyfriend Craig, Adrienne Hall took off with him on a six-month adventure, walking the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine in the spring and summer of 1996. Her book is a tale of unrelenting blisters, bone pain, and miserable weather, interspersed with rare moments of beauty, love, and a sense of accomplishment. While the book focuses on their day-to-day slog up the continent, she often interrupts her story to discuss the history and current condition of the trail. These little essays are not always successfully integrated into the narrative, but by the end she has made an overwhelming argument for the preservation of this strip of trail that cuts across some of the most populated areas in the country. Although the trail, even now, does not provide a true wilderness experience, it does offer an alternative to the sprawl and vulgarization of the countryside. The values it inspires in those who hike all or a part of it are precious, Hall argues, and could be lost forever if the trail is further degraded. Just the trail's existence is an important element in the national conversation about the place of nature in the world of man. Hall's style is engaging and unpretentious. Every reader will respond to the hardships she and Craig voluntarily endured and enjoy her stories of fellow hikers and some of the generous people she met in trailside villages. But it's her descriptions of the polluted vistas and degraded environment that make the most lasting impact. The author has made her personal journey a warning for us all about the kind of world we are making for ourselves. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advancedstudents, and adults. 2000, Globe Pequot Press/Appalachian Mountain Club, 197p, maps, 23cm, 00-021504, $14.95. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Michael P. Healy; English Teacher, Wood River H.S. Hailey, ID (7a), May 2001 (Vol. 35 No. 3)
Library Journal
The adventure of hiking the Appalachian Trail has already been described in many guidebooks, inspirational accounts (Jean Deed's There Are Mountains To Climb), and humorous stories (Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods). Hall (Backpacking: A Woman's Guide) has managed to combine all three of those genres into one excellent narrative that depicts Hall's experience of hiking the trail with her boyfriend from Georgia to Maine and also discusses the trail's historical background as well as the issues it currently faces. Although Hall may get up on the environmental soapbox a little too often, her narrative keeps the reader turning the pages. Entertaining, well written, and informative, this book will appeal both to those contemplating a hike of the trail and to the armchair travelers. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.--John J. McCormick, New Hampshire State Lib., Concord Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781878239914
Publisher:
Appalachian Mountain Club Books MA
Publication date:
04/01/2000
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 9.33(h) x 1.05(d)

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