A Life Apart: A Novel

A Life Apart: A Novel

4.0 2
by L. Y. Marlow
     
 

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From the author of Color Me Butterfly, a poignant novel about a decades-long love affair and the complicated and unbreakable ties between two families that live worlds apart.

Morris Sullivan joins the navy in 1940 with a love of ships and high hopes. Though he leaves behind his new wife, Agnes, and their baby daughter,

Overview

From the author of Color Me Butterfly, a poignant novel about a decades-long love affair and the complicated and unbreakable ties between two families that live worlds apart.

Morris Sullivan joins the navy in 1940 with a love of ships and high hopes. Though he leaves behind his new wife, Agnes, and their baby daughter, he is thrilled to be pursuing his lifelong dream—but things change when he is shipped off to Pearl Harbor when the war begins. When he narrowly survives the 1941 attack thanks to the courage of a black sailor he doesn't know, Morris is determined to seek out the man's family and express his gratitude and respect. On leave, he tracks down the man's sister in his own hometown of Boston—and finds an immediate and undeniable connection with the nurturing yet fiercely independent Beatrice, who has left the stifling South of her upbringing for the more liberal, integrated north. 

Though both try to deny their growing bond, their connection and understanding is everything missing from Morris's hasty marriage to his high school sweetheart and from Beatrice's plodding life as she grieves the brother she has lost. At once a family epic and a historical drama that brings the streets and neighborhoods of Boston vividly to life from World War II through the civil rights era to the present day, A Life Apart takes readers along for the emotional journey as Morris and Beatrice's relationship is tested by time, family loyalties, unending guilt, racial tensions, death, and the profound effects of war.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
2014-01-21
A forbidden interracial attraction spans decades of secret involvement and some surprising attachments to reach a place of forgiveness. Experience tells Beatrice Dobbins that, in pre–civil rights America, no good will come of a friendship between herself and a married white man. Yet there's an undeniable attraction between Beatrice and Morris Sullivan, the sailor whose life Beatrice's brother, Robert, saved during the Pearl Harbor attack in December 1941. Robert was killed later in the raid, and Morris wrote Beatrice a letter of condolence, the beginning of a long correspondence between the black trainee teacher—originally from Mississippi—and the husband of Agnes and father of Emma, all living in Boston. Friends, family and Beatrice's own sense of rectitude keep the couple apart for 15 years, but in the 1960s, they meet again, and their love is declared and consummated. In her second book, Marlow (Color Me Butterfly, 2007) displays an emotional sensitivity that lends heart to her story, but there's a tendency toward melodrama and some tiring vacillation among the characters, especially the undercharacterized Morris, who moves back and forth between the needs of his two different families, seemingly unable to choose between them. The passing of the years brings shocks, achievements and unexpected late reconciliation. Extreme events, big issues and complicated feelings are sometimes beyond the scope of this overlong, simply told tale, but Marlow deftly tugs the heartstrings throughout.
Library Journal
04/15/2014
The instant connection Morris Sullivan and Beatrice Dobbins feel for each other is undeniable. But in 1940s America, any type of interracial relationship is severely frowned upon, not to mention that Morris is newly married with a young daughter. Beatrice's brother, Robert, had saved Morris's life in the attack on Pearl Harbor only to lose his own life later during the raid. Trying to find family contacts for an African American soldier is just the first of many clashes with segregation that Morris encounters. Meeting Beatrice in person to express his condolences and thanks sparks a friendship that develops into a growing love so very different from his feelings for his wife, Agnes. As the decades march on through the civil rights era to the current day, Beatrice, Morris, and Agnes are continually tested socially and personally, finally finding forgiveness for one another and for themselves. VERDICT Marlow's (Color Me Butterfly) second novel showcases her lyrical, expressive writing with touching moments that do much to cover the deficiencies in her somewhat tedious and imbalanced characters.—Joy Gunn, Paseo Verde Lib., Henderson, NV

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307719393
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
04/22/2014
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
774,892
Product dimensions:
5.22(w) x 8.01(h) x 0.96(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

L. Y. MARLOW is the author of Color Me Butterfly and the founder of Saving Promise, a national organization dedicated to raising awareness of and preventing domestic violence. She lives in Maryland.

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A Life Apart: A Novel 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lindz2012 More than 1 year ago
I enjoy this era a bit. I was keep interest in WWII. I also like the way this book went about differently and how thing got complicated between the father and mother of the book. I also like how a romance happened between a white solider and a black solider sister. You learn about some of the things going on Civil Rights. You see it though his daughters, there mothers. It really is a good book.