Little Night Music

A Little Night Music

4.0 6
by Catherine Zeta-Jones, Angela Lansbury
     
 
A Little Night Music, a bittersweet tale of romantic longing and furtive liaisons unfolding over a single midsummer's evening in the Swedish countryside, remains among composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim's most admired and best known works, as well as one of his most commercially successful. The musical, inspired by Ingmar Bergman's classic film Smiles of

Overview

A Little Night Music, a bittersweet tale of romantic longing and furtive liaisons unfolding over a single midsummer's evening in the Swedish countryside, remains among composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim's most admired and best known works, as well as one of his most commercially successful. The musical, inspired by Ingmar Bergman's classic film Smiles of A Summer Night and featuring a book by Hugh Wheeler, logged in 601 performances during its first Broadway run in 1973.

New York magazine has called this new, more intimate, chamber-style production, developed at London's Menier Chocolate Factory by acclaimed director Trevor Nunn, "stunning, ...devastatingly good." Oscar-winning actress Catherine Zeta-Jones (Chicago) makes her long-awaited Broadway debut in the lead role of Desiree. Jones's show-stopping co-star Angela Lansbury is without a doubt the hardest working octogenarian on Broadway. From the Label

Product Details

Release Date:
04/06/2010
Label:
Nonesuch
UPC:
0075597979800
catalogNumber:
523488
Rank:
89437

Related Subjects

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. Act 1. Overture / Night Waltz
  2. Act 1. Prologue: The Night Smiles...
  3. Act 1. Now
  4. Act 1. Later
  5. Act 1. Soon
  6. Act 1. The Glamorous Life
  7. Act 1. Remember?
  8. Act 1. You Must Meet My Wife
  9. Act 1. 'A Virgin'
  10. Act 1. Liaisons
  11. Act 1. In Praise of Women
  12. Act 1. Every Day a Little Death
  13. Act 1. The Tour's Over for a While...
  14. Act 1. A Weekend in the Country

Disc 2

  1. Act 2. The Sun Won't Set
  2. Act 2. Night Waltz 2
  3. Act 2. It Would Have Been Wonderful
  4. Act 2. Perpetual Anticipation
  5. Act 2. Send in the Clowns
  6. Act 2. The Miller's Son
  7. Act 2. Soon (Reprise) / You Must Meet My Wife (Reprise)
  8. Act 2. 'A Wooden Ring'
  9. Act 2. A Weekend in the Country (Reprise) / Every Day a Little Death (R
  10. Act 2. Send in the Clowns (Reprise)
  11. Act 2. Last Waltz

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Catherine Zeta-Jones   Primary Artist,Vocals
Angela Lansbury   Primary Artist,Vocals
Alexander Hanson   Primary Artist
Charles Descarfino   Timpani
Susan Jolles   Harp
Tom Murray   Piano,Conductor
David Blinn   Viola
Patrick Pridemore   French Horn
Matthew Lehmann   Violin,Concert Master
Aaron Lazar   Vocals
Leigh Ann Larkin   Vocals
Mairi Dorman Phaneuf   Cello
Katherine Doherty   Vocals
Tawnya Popoff   Viola
Thomas Sefcovic   Bassoon
Bradley Dean   Vocals
Susan Perelman   Violin
Dick Sarpola   Bass
Betsy Morgan   Vocals
Stephen R. Buntrock   Vocals
Alexander Hanson   Vocals
Erin Davie   Vocals
David Young   Woodwind
Ramona Mallory   Vocals
Paul Staroba   Celeste
Marissa McGowan   Vocals
Kevin David Thomas   Vocals
Keaton Whittaker   Vocals
Jayne Paterson   Vocals
Hunter Ryan Herdlicka   Vocals

Technical Credits

Stephen Sondheim   Composer,Lyricist
Philip Chaffin   Executive Producer
Robert Hurwitz   Executive Producer
Tommy Krasker   Recording Producer
Tom Murray   Music Direction
Hugh Wheeler   Book
Trevor Nunn   Stage Direction
Victor Mancusi   Pro-Tools
Bart Migal   Engineer
Sean Patrick Flahaven   Executive Producer
Frank Rich   Liner Notes
Jason Carr   Orchestration
Robert Edridge-Waks   Editorial Coordinator

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A Little Night Music 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
imajeepguyNY More than 1 year ago
The producer's decision to put this cast album out on two discs is a great one. This allows quite a bit of the dialogue to be included giving the listener a chance to really follow the story. It also highlights the tremendous ACTING abilities of its stars. Angela Lansbury and Catherine Zeta-Jones shine. Like the reviews for the show said, the supporting cast can at times get a little cartoonish and loud, especially the character of Anne and Henrik. But there are some great highlights on here as well, most notably "Every Day a Little Death", "The Miller's Son", "Liasons" and of course "Send in the Clowns". A must disc for any Sondheim fan. I saw this show on Broadway, and listening to these cds brought back all the joy I experienced sitting in the Walter Kerr Theater.
garydisarmadasco More than 1 year ago
I awaited the release of this cd as I have the original with G. John and H. Gingold and wanted to hear it with the better sound and finer effects that time and' technology has brought us. I never dared to buy the film soundtrack. I donit think I could have borne it. Don't mean to sound like a snob, but paying full price for a mostly dubbed soundtrack? Nope. So, I wait, happily until April for the CD, and, fortunately, it was released the day I had to schlep to the airport to pick some people up which gave me ample time to listen to it. I should have waited until I could have at least checked it out on iTunes, first. I was not prepared for how bad Zeta Jones, was. I knew she had a stronger and broader voice than John's...but had hope. I was let down. She couldn't sing it. She sang the soundtrack of 'Chicago' so well and was made for that role, as far as a Hollywood based actor could be. (do not want to get into the Broadway vs Hollywood choices that brought many arguments into my relationships...especially the Madonna in 'Evita' chord that I could not bear to think about although SHE did better than I had anticipated). Cannot say the same for Zeta Jones. When she sang the tear jerking (once one understands the song, which took me some time), 'Send in the Clowns'...it was just void of emotion. I usually, too, base my opinions on the lyrics and thusly on how the lyrics are dealt with. Zeta Jones, it seemed to me, did not understand what she was singing about. John's did it without the power that Zeta Jones, did....and it was more powerful in its raw, emotional revelation that the song is, brings. I also loved the young 'Hendrik' and his version of 'Later', one of my favorite Sondheim songs....both lyrically and musically. The male leads did their jobs well enough and Leigh Ann Larkin, a belter who was a great 'Baby June'...could have softened it up a bit, but the song itself is so sweet, I overlooked it and ended up enjoying it. Of course, Lansbury.....as always, is great. At 84 years old, she is still putting them out there. She does not have the quirkiness of Hermoine Gingold, but who does? Her songs, her vocals, her recitation, if that is what it is called, was great. 'Liaisons'...a great song sung from a disillusioned person who simply wants to live in her memories of happier times. Lansbury does this with ease. I see a 6th Tony for her this year. Zeta Jones, unfortunately, again is the problem. She is throughout the soundtrack but either does not get it, the lyrics, story...etc...or was incapable of doing it. She seems to want to, at every moment, break out of the restraints the director was putting on her to break out into 'Everything's Coming up Roses'....ala, well, anyone who has played Mama Rose. I mean, she is not awful and might do better in a role that is more edgy or louder but not this role...which calls for someone to be a player to all those on the outside, but is close to a breakdown, throughout. One just cannot do "Clowns" like "Roses"! I saw Judi Dench sing/speak through "Clowns" and it was amazing. Indeed, could Zeta Jones be simply too young for the role, and therefore unable to get across that which only one who has been 'there and back', several times, hurt, crushed, resurrected....etc...could bring to the role and its songs. Or....maybe I am being too mean. If you can....buy the "Best Of" version of the album unless you are like me, and want the full CD, every version of cert
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OK - Angela Lansbury, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Sondheim, a highly anticipated "NIGHT MUSIC." Should be an absolute gem, right? I was so disappointed. Not in the lead characters, they were adequate. But WHY do these new revivals, especially the grand ones, reduce the orchestra to 8 or 9, maybe a dozen players (this is a practice that also ruined the revivals of "Company" and "Sweeney Todd" for me). I know - COST. But, this recording suffers from it. How I long for a recording of the Lincoln Center revival from the 90's that was broadcast on PBS. Now THAT was what Sondheim should sound like. And don't tell me the backers of this musical couldn't afford a full orchestra - it's SONDHEIM! That being said I would love to SEE the show live. I have a feeling some of the sparseness of the scoring would be absorbed by the lushness of the visuals. This was NOT the Sondheim I was expecting.
SimplySondheim More than 1 year ago
The new Broadway cast recording of Stephen Sondheim's classic 1973 musical A Little Night Music was highly anticipated. With the original cast recording a staple in any Sondheim fan's collection, this new recording had to exceed expectations. And, boy, did it ever. The cast is led by the wonderful Catherine Zeta-Jones, making her Broadway debut, in the role of Desiree Armfelt. She shines on the disc, nailing every moment, both comedic and dramatic. Her Send in the Clowns (one of Sondheim's most famous songs) is so full of depth and emotion, in every way. While Zeta-Jones is phenomenal, one of the best reasons to buy this disc is for Angela Lansbury as Madame Armfelt. She shines like no one else, her Liaisons a highlight on the disc. The rest of the cast is exceptional as well. My only (very mild) complaint is with Romona Mallory, playing Anne Egerman. She sometimes sounds very shrill and annoying, especially on A Weekend in the Country. I know this is part of the character, but it is sometimes jarring on disc. Alas, it doesn't happen very often, and gets less noticeable with each listen. Some may have qualms with the reduced orchestrations. While some have worked in the past (See: the 2005 Sweeney Todd revival) and some haven't (see: the 2008 Sunday in The Park With George revival), I have to say that the "chamber musical" orchestrations here lend themselves very well to the score. The only time I felt myself missing the original was during A Weekend in the Country. Overall, I highly recommend this recording to any fan of the Sondheim.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago