A Manager's Guide to Sexual Orientation in the WorkPlace

A Manager's Guide to Sexual Orientation in the WorkPlace

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by Bob Powers, Alan Ellis
     
 

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For the first time ever, managers will have a tool that will enable them to effectively grapple with the controversial, and sometimes explosive issues surrounding sexual orientation. Cultivated from Bob Power's 25
years business experience with some of the world's finest organizations, A Manager's Guide to Sexual Orientation

Overview

For the first time ever, managers will have a tool that will enable them to effectively grapple with the controversial, and sometimes explosive issues surrounding sexual orientation. Cultivated from Bob Power's 25
years business experience with some of the world's finest organizations, A Manager's Guide to Sexual Orientation in
the Workplace provides managers with the knowledge, skills and resources to foster higher productivity and performance through an all-inclusive work environment.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
How do American companies develop diversity in programs in their workplaces today that successfully integrate gays and lesbians into the corporate fabric of inclusivity? This question is the first premise for both these books. Bob Powers and Alan Ellis, long-time diversity trainers, look at specific individuals-gay/lesbian/bisexual/heterosexual-who have come to terms with sexual orientation workplace issues themselves and influenced others in a positive way. In six chapters the authors build on these personal accounts to explore how managers can implement diversity programs and make them work. A highlight of the book is a listing of "101 ways to make your workplace more inclusive." An excellent resource listing concludes the work. Winfield and Spielman, who are founders and principals of Common Ground, a consulting firm that specializes in workplace education about sexual orientation, offer a far more ambitious book. While they also incorporate personal stories to make points, they succeed in creating a far more comprehensive manual on how to achieve true diversity for sexual minorities. In addition to describing successful corporate diversity programs (notably Lotus and AT&T), they go on to cover discussions of what "domestic partnership benefits" are and how they can be realistically achieved in work settings. Both works are recommended to general readers.-Richard Drezen, "Washington Post" News Research Ctr., Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415912778
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
09/28/1995
Pages:
222
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Bob Powers is president of Bob Powers & Associates, Inc., a firm which helps organizations attain business goals and enhance life in the workplace. He has worked with clients including AT&T, British Airways, Federal Express, General Motors, the Internal Revenue Service and the New York Stock Exchange. Powers has consulted with the highest levels of the world's most impressive organizations and is publicly outspoken about being gay. Alan Ellis teaches psychology and human sexuality at San Francisco State University and is president of Bob Powers Publications. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Illinois.

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A Manager's Guide to Sexual Orientation in the WorkPlace 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book will only be helpful if you know next to nothing on this subject. There are some serious works dealing with sexual orientation in the workplace. This is not one of them. A serious book would examine the kinds of issues that exist, why they exist and how a manager can address those issues. The authors' stance 'they're here, they're queer, get use to it' doesn't work when dealing with employees making a gay employee's life miserable. Considering the book consists of mostly chapters on 'work coming out' stories, that add human interest but little substance, and 'how to support diversity' lists, that lack originality, not to mention a few blank pages insert here and there, the only thing I could think of is that the authors wanted to cash in on a hot topic fast.