A Map of the Child: A Pediatrician's Tour of the Body

Overview

Dr. Darshak Sanghavi has learned to read the body -- to recognize patterns of sickness, apply modern medical technology when warranted, and to offer comfort through human contact, all vital skills when working with patients who are often too young or too ill to speak. In this compelling book, he shares his experiences by taking readers on an illuminating tour of the child's developing body.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$16.37
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$19.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $12.11   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Dr. Darshak Sanghavi has learned to read the body -- to recognize patterns of sickness, apply modern medical technology when warranted, and to offer comfort through human contact, all vital skills when working with patients who are often too young or too ill to speak. In this compelling book, he shares his experiences by taking readers on an illuminating tour of the child's developing body.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The author, a pediatrician and father, presents the complexities of his specialty in this engaging and informative medical narrative. Drawing on case studies, Sanghavi details what can go wrong in each part of a child's body and what medical science can or can't do about it. Sanghavi guides readers through his medical routine: in Japan, working with a team of pediatric cardiologists, he assists in the successful operation on a three-month-old infant with a blockage on the right side of his heart. However, despite the advances of medical technology, some children cannot be saved. Bobby, a five-year-old with cystic fibrosis, undergoes treatment every few months for his damaged lungs, but despite the best efforts of physicians his condition will continue to deteriorate. Throughout these accounts of seriously ill children, the author's strong commitment to his patients and his profession shines through. Although Sanghavi's initial motivation was to increase the reader's awareness of pediatric medicine, he comes to a personal realization that he has to make a leap from seeing "lungs and hearts" to "seeing whole people." Especially moving is a description of the author's feelings of medical helplessness when his father was dying and there were no more treatment options. (Jan.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Structuring his book to follow patient rounds at the Children's Hospital in Boston, where he did his training in pediatrics, Sanghavi takes the reader on a tour of discovery through eight organ systems of a child's body, beginning with the lungs and ending with the gut. He describes how these systems work and what happens when something goes wrong, recounting true case studies that range from the commonplace (broken bones) to the peculiar (a teenage boy with a positive pregnancy test). Sanghavi also shares his personal insights into the ideology of being a compassionate physician. An outstanding quality of this work is that it shows how the author handles controversial issues, such as abortion and child abuse, in an objective and level-headed manner. Sanghavi's humanism is encouraging in today's world of high-tech, bottom-line medical care. His very readable book is a good resource for parents, as well as educators, social workers, and healthcare personnel who interact with children. Recommended for wellness collections and high school, public, and medical libraries seeking authoritative personal narratives about medicine.-Deborah Broocker, Georgia Perimeter Coll. Lib., Dunwoody, GA
Kirkus Reviews
An elucidation of the human child’s organs, the how and why of illnesses that strike them, and such related issues as circumcision, vaccination, abortion, learning disabilities, and child abuse—all enriched by the author’s personal memories. Sanghavi (Pediatric Cardiologist/Children’s Hospital, Boston) organizes his text around organs, devoting a chapter each to the lungs, heart, blood, bones, brain, skin, gonads, and finally the guts. He uses stories of his young patients and their concerned parents to explain a great deal about anatomy, medicine, procedures, and problems. In the section on lungs, for example, the birth of a premature baby reveals how the lungs develop, the case of an asthmatic girl raises public health issues, and children with cystic fibrosis demonstrate the failed promise of gene therapy. The chapter on bones, which discusses medical identification of child battery, focuses on the case of Matthew Eappen, whose death resulted in the well-publicized 1997 trial and conviction of an English au pair (later released by the judge). Sanghavi’s patients come to him with conditions as common as chicken pox or diabetes and as rare as ambiguous sexuality, a brain tumor, or a malformed heart. They include children from such diverse backgrounds as a Boston slum, a Tokyo suburb, and a Navajo reservation. Into his insightful narratives of these youngsters, he weaves touching memories of his parents, especially his ailing father, and family stories of life in India. Poignantly, the chapter on skin, which opens in a neonatal care unit where a new father is warming his tiny infant son by holding him against his own bare chest, closes with the author throwing handfuls of his father’sashes into a river and feeling fine particles of the dust blow back onto the skin of his own face and hands. Sanghavi describes this work as part of his "quest to learn humanity," a goal he has heartwarmingly achieved. Appealing and informative.
From the Publisher

"A delightful, quirky, awe-inspiring journey into the science and stories of the insides of little people. Who would expect a book about anatomy to be a page turner? But this one is. Sanghavi is a vivid and effortless teller of human tales and quite evidently a special doctor, too. Pick up the book anywhere. You'll find strange cases, fascinating discoveries, ingenious diagnoses, beautiful puzzles beautifully recounted. I defy you to put it down."-Atul Gawande, author of Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science

"A Map of the Child is a wonderful romp through the human body as seen through the eyes of a discerning and sensitive pediatrician. Sanghavi's organizes his material by organ systems, but this simply gives him a launching point to take the reader on spellbinding excursions. His writing delves deep into the heart of what medicine is and the miracles and hazards of the voyage of childhood."-Abraham Verghese, author of The Tennis Partner and My Own Country

"Dr. Sanghavi teaches by example and complements his stories with science, medicine, religion, philosophy and social commentary. Having watched Dr. Sanghavi's own development as a pediatrician, it is wonderful to observe the power that his personal learning experience can now have on others, be they medical colleagues, parents or general readers. Indeed, Dr. Sanghavi provides a roadmap and directory for understanding the impact of illness on children as well as those who care for them."-Philip A. Pizzo, MD, Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine

"Appealing and informative...An elucidation of the human child's organs, the how and why of illnesses that strike them, and such related issues as circumcision, vaccination, abortion, and child abuse-all enriched by the author's personal memories. Sanghavi describes this work as part of his "quest to learn humanity," a goal he has heartwarmingly achieved."-Kirkus Reviews

"An outstanding quality of this work is that it shows how the author handles controversial issues, such as abortion and child abuse, in an objective and level-headed manner."-Library Journal, starred review

132"An example of expert storytelling-a true page turner. [Sanghavi's] profession has provided him with a wealth of illuminating stories that he weaves together seamlesly...Compelling, thoughtful and informative."-Albert L. Huebner, Bookpage

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805075113
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/1/2004
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 796,262
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Darshak Sanghavi graduated from Harvard and Johns Hopkins University. He has done medical research in Japan, India, Kenya, and Peru, and until recently was a pediatrician for the U.S. Indian Health Service, where he lived on a Navajo reservation in New Mexico. He is currently practicing pediatric cardiology at Boston's Children's Hospital and lives in Boston with his wife and son.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface: A Life Begins xi
1. Lungs: From Bombay to Boston, stories of people and lungs seeking freedom 1
2. Heart: Tales with varying degrees of closure 33
3. Blood: On the path to redemption 58
4. Bones: On the interpretation of omens 92
5. Brain: On the acceptance and taming of danger 136
6. Skin: On the making and breaking of contact 167
7. Gonads: On the need for mentioning the unmentionable 196
8. Guts: On remedying various kinds of emptiness, and a concluding confession 225
Notes 255
Acknowledgments 291
Index 293
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2010

    Great book!

    This book is very informative and teaches parents and students about the bodies of children in a way that is interesting. Sanghavi writes about his experiences with his patients and also about his personal life to inform readers. He discusses several body systems in the book and describes many different problems that can arise in a developing child. He also writes about how he treats patients with these problems. Parents and students will enjoy reading this book about the bodies of children.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2005

    Wonderful

    I ordered this book by mistake, and was glad that I did! This should be required reading for highschoolers learning about the body. Compelling and engagingly told, Dr. Sanghavi is a storyteller who makes the workings of the human body understandable and relevant to those of us who are science-challenged! A jewel of a book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2003

    where is the chapter on Immunology?!

    I wanted this book when I was pregnant with my 3rd child- a step by step guide through the child¿s body. The chapters included are Lungs, Heart, Blood, Bones, Brain, Skin, Gonads, Guts. Each chapter includes a nice discussion of how the organ or set of organs, are supposed to function and a few case studies on what can go wrong with them. Darshak Sanghavi strikes me as a very intelligent, compassionate and caring pediatrician. He attended Harvard Medical School and trained at Boston¿s Children¿s Hospital. Generally only the most successful of students have those opportunities. Darshak attends summer camps for kids with cancers and makes his way to a Navajo reservation to practice pediatrics- presumably his education was paid in part because of an agreement to work in underserved areas. Over the course of the book, he talks about the extra time he spends with his young patients, making them comfortable and explaining their illnesses to their parents. Noble goals, all in all. Unfortunately, the author misses a crucial chapter when he fails to include Immunology, and he apparently hasn¿t read the American Academy of Pediatrics Statement on the Use of Human Milk. This statement includes over 100 references, citing the need for human babies to receive their mother¿s milk for at least the first 6 months of life. Why is this significant? In his chapter on Blood, a child undergoes a bone marrow transplant. It has been well documented that organ transplants are more successful if the recipient was breastfed as a child. It would have been useful to see mention of this fact. No one expects their child to have an organ transplant, but I think all mothers would do whatever they could to ensure that the child survives one. Sadly, this child didn¿t. I¿m not sure if Darshak really likes seeing mothers parent instinctively or naturally. The same chapter opens with the only account of a homebirth in the book and leads to the case of a child with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn or HDN. Homebirths are safer than hospital births and the outcomes for the baby are much better when the child is born at home. I don¿t find it coincidental that the author chose this family to illustrate a very rare condition that could happen in the hospital as well as at home. After all, any mother can decline the Vitamin K injection for her baby. The chapter on Bones includes a lengthy review of a child abuse case and a discussion on medical findings in abuse. Artificially fed infants are at greater risk of being abused by their parents than are breastfed babies. Pediatricians need to let parents know that their job as parents will be more stressful when they bottle feed their baby rather than breastfeeding. In the case study in the book, it was a nanny who abused the child, not the parent, but it is an important piece of information that parents need to know. In Guts, a small, but important piece of information is left out. The chapter includes an 8 year old girl who is diagnosed with Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitis (IDDM) and we read that ¿no preventable risk factors have been identified¿. Had Dr. Sanghavi read the literature published in the Lancet, among other journals, he would have learned that early introduction to cow¿s milk is a significant risk factor in developing IDDM. Most infant formulas are cow¿s milk based, therefore, most infants not breastfed have early cow¿s milk exposure. If parents are given that knowledge, that is an easily prevented risk factor. Why did this pediatrician fail to give it in this easily read form? The infant who is dehydrated at the beginning of this same chapter is also a breastfed (all one word, no hyphen) baby. Rarely do breastfed babies suffer diarrhea, rarely do mothers have a hard time keeping up with their child¿s needs. Human milk is a very eff

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2002

    What a great book

    Something every parrent should have...I can't recommend it enough.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2002

    A Must Read!

    A fascinating tour of a sensitive young pediatrician's personal journey through his experiences with childhood diseases, both common and rare, in several locations throughout the world. This multi-faceted work deals with the author's responses to his small patients, with clear descriptions of the disease entities encountered, with medical history, and in at least one case, with contemporary headlines. While geared to the lay public, and not only to parents, physicians will also read it with pleasure.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)