A Matter-of-Fact Magic Book: Magic in the Park

A Matter-of-Fact Magic Book: Magic in the Park

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by Ruth Chew
     
 

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"Ruth Chew's classic books perfectly capture the joy of everyday magic."—Mary Pope Osborne, bestselling author of the Magic Tree House series

Jen Mace and her new friend, Mike Steward, learn that magic can happen when you least expect it. And though it is very exciting, it can also be dangerous.
Jen has just moved to Brooklyn. She misses the woods and

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Overview

"Ruth Chew's classic books perfectly capture the joy of everyday magic."—Mary Pope Osborne, bestselling author of the Magic Tree House series

Jen Mace and her new friend, Mike Steward, learn that magic can happen when you least expect it. And though it is very exciting, it can also be dangerous.
Jen has just moved to Brooklyn. She misses the woods and fields of her old home, but while walking in Prospect Park, Jen meets Mike.  Together they are fascinated by the older gentleman who is always surrounded by birds and seems to appear and disappear quite suddenly.

   For decades, Ruth Chew's books have been enchanting early readers with the thrill of magic in their own lives. Now these tales are once again available to work their spell on a new generation of fans.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greta Holt
Jennifer Mace hates having to move from Carbondale to Brooklyn, where there will be a total of five fourth grade classes in her school. Mother encourages her to explore Prospect Park for something to do. There, she sees an old man in a baggy brown overcoat who is feeding the birds. A raven waits at his side. The old man says that the raven’s name is Napoleon. Jennifer feeds a squirrel and looks into a large tree that seems to be hollow. When she turns back, the man is gone. The next day, she meets a boy named Mike at the park and discovers that he is in fourth grade, as well. Together they set out on adventures that take them into a magic that is based upon the wonder of nature. Back in print, this story is from another time and place when children could run in parks alone, meet strange old men without fear of harm, and see their young worlds as enchanted. Reviewer: Greta Holt; Ages 7 to 10.
School Library Journal
01/01/2015
Gr 2–4—Fantasy author Chew knew how to tempt kids: spells, witches, wizards, and sea serpents were all to be found in her burgeoning bag of tricks. Starting in 2013, with No Such Thing as a Witch, and Three Witch Tales, and What the Witch Left, Random House has been rereleasing her books, jazzed up with new jacket art, under the series title "A Matter-of-Fact Magic Book." These offerings all retain Chew's classic black-and-white illustrations, and there's even an Easter egg for readers with a love of all things vintage (removing the dust jacket reveals the old covers by Chew, still intact). Each of these latest rereleases follows a different boy-girl pair through an exhilarating adventure, packed with whimsical details and kid-friendly thrills. In Magic in the Park, Jennifer, a newcomer to Brooklyn, explores Prospect Park with her friend Mike, discovering a strange—and possibly magical—old man who feeds the birds, while in The Would-be Witch, siblings Andy and Robin shrink down to the size of mice and ride a magical flying dustpan, only to find themselves in the company of witches. These titles will attract a new generation of budding fantasy fans. Look for new editions of Chew's other books, still to come.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449813768
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/28/2014
Series:
A Stepping Stone Book(TM) Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
443,562
Product dimensions:
5.16(w) x 8.78(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
520L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

RUTH CHEW was born in Minneapolis and studied at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C.
Working as a fashion artist, she started writing stories about witches for the youngest of her five children. The first of these, The Wednesday Witch, was a big hit, and her new career was born. Ruth Chew went on to write 29 tales of magic and fantasy that have enchanted generations of readers.

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A Matter-of-Fact Magic Book: Magic in the Park 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Irregular Orbit ~ 100 Shot Challenge ~ #62 <p> From the very day l was born, there was something different about me. Something that set me apart from all of the other kids. I mean, l did have hair and eyes and a mouth like everyone else, but something else had always been there. My mother had always wondered why none of the other kids wanted to go near me. She had always thought they were just very judgemental. But seriously, 4 year olds don't have a single judgemental bone in them. <p> I had always been that one girl that everyone wanted to stay as far away as they could. I never did anything to anyone. I'd never said a mean thing to any of them. I never realized that what l was missing was complete normalcy. <p> Everytime l touched someone a fast clip would flash through my mind. The person was always taking their last breath before the life was ripped from their soul. I used to think it was just my brain playing tricks on me. But when a girl on the play ground complained about seeing something scary, l knew it was real and l wasn't the only person seeing the images. <p> It wasn't my fault. I couldn't help that l was seeing other people's deaths. And it sure as heck wasn't my fault that they got to witness their own, also. I distanced myself from all physical touch. Even hugging my own parents was a big No. I hated the way they died. It was so painful. <p> I hadn't told my mother or father about the things l was able to see. I was afraid they would throw me in a psych ward. I would never come out, and l would loose what little love l had been given. But things have gotten too hard for me. Carrying this burden on my own was getting to be too much for me. I was going to crash. <p> This is where courage comes in. I remember walking into the kitchen, both of my parents sitting happily at the table. They looked over at me expectantly when l had cleared my throat. My heart had felt like it had stopped. <p> Swallowing hard, l looked at them very seriously and finally spoke. "I have something important to tell you guys. And it's very hard for me to speak about such an awful thing." <p> By now, my mothers face was white. I half thought they were expecting a 'l'm le<_>sbian' kinda speech. But this was completely different. And l needed to get it over with. <p> "I need to tell you about my irregular orbit. I can see how people will die just by touchin them. And then the same image will be shown unto the person l touched." <p> I was waiting for the worst. Waiting for them to call the earest mental hospital and tak me in. But what l recieved was almost worse. <p> Silence.