A Midsummer Night's Dream (Folger Shakespeare Library Series) (PagePerfect NOOK Book) [NOOK Book]

Overview

The authoritative edition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, is now available as an ebook. Features include:


> The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference
> Hundreds of ...

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A Midsummer Night's Dream (Folger Shakespeare Library Series) (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

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Overview

The authoritative edition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, is now available as an ebook. Features include:


> The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference
> Hundreds of hypertext links for instant navigation
> Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play
> Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play
> Scene-by-scene plot summaries
> A key to famous lines and phrases
> An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language
> Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books
> An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451682083
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/15/2011
  • Series: Folger Shakespeare Library Series
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Annotated
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 83,628
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

John R. Ford teaches at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. Ford is the author of numerous books and articles on Shakespeare. In 2006 Ford was awarded the Excellence in Research Award from Delta State University.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

list of parts

THESEUS, Duke of Athens
HIPPOLYTA, Queen of the Amazons, betrothed to Theseus
EGEUS, an Athenian courtier, father to Hermia
LYSANDER, in love with Hermia
HERMIA, in love with Lysander, but ordered by her father to marry Demetrius
DEMETRIUS, in love with Hermia, though once a suitor to Helena
HELENA, in love with Demetrius
Peter QUINCE, a carpenter and leader of an amateur dramatic group, who speaks the PROLOGUE to their play
Nick BOTTOM, a weaver, who plays PYRAMUS in the amateur play
Francis FLUTE, a bellows-mender, who plays THISBE in the amateur play
SNUG, a joiner, who plays a LION in the amateur play
Tom SNOUT, a tinker, who plays a WALL in the amateur play
Robin STARVELING, a tailor, who plays MOONSHINE in the amateur play
OBERON, King of Fairies
TITANIA, Queen of Fairies
ROBIN Goodfellow, also known as Puck, a sprite in the service of Oberon
PEASEBLOSSOM
COBWEB
MOTH
MUSTARDSEED
PHILOSTRATE, an official in Theseus' court
Other Attendants at the court of Theseus; other Fairies attendant upon Oberon

Act 1 [Scene 1] running scene 1

Enter Theseus, Hippolyta, with others [Philostrate and attendants]

THESEUS Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace. Four happy days bring in
Another moon: but O, methinks, how slow
This old moon wanes; she lingers my desires,
Like to a stepdame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man's revenue.

HIPPOLYTA Four days will quickly steep themselves in
nights,
Four nights will quickly dream away the time.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New-bent in heaven,shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.

THESEUS Go, Philostrate,
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments,
Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth,
Turn melancholy forth to funerals:
The pale companion is not for our pomp.

[Exit Philostrate]

Hippolyta, I wooed thee with my sword,
And won thy love doing thee injuries.
But I will wed thee in another key,
With pomp, with triumph and with revelling.

Enter Egeus and his daughter Hermia, Lysander and Demetrius

EGEUS Happy be Theseus, our renownèd duke.

THESEUS Thanks, good Egeus: what's the news with thee?

EGEUS Full of vexation come I, with complaint
Against my child, my daughter Hermia.
Stand forth, Demetrius. My noble lord,
This man hath my consent to marry her.
Stand forth, Lysander. And my gracious duke,
This man hath bewitched the bosom of my child.-
Thou, thou, Lysander, thou hast given her rhymes,
And interchanged love-tokens with my child.
Thou hast by moonlight at her window sung,
With feigning voice verses of feigning love,
And stol'n the impression of her fantasy
With bracelets of thy hair, rings, gauds, conceits,
Knacks, trifles, nosegays, sweetmeats - messengers
Of strong prevailment in unhardened youth -
With cunning hast thou filched my daughter's heart,
Turned her obedience, which is due to me,
To stubborn harshness.- And, my gracious duke,
Be it so she will not here before your grace
Consent to marry with Demetrius,
I beg the ancient privilege of Athens:
As she is mine, I may dispose of her;
Which shall be either to this gentleman
Or to her death, according to our law
Immediately provided in that case.

THESEUS What say you, Hermia? Be advised, fair maid,
To you your father should be as a god,
One that composed your beauties, yea, and one
To whom you are but as a form in wax
By him imprinted and within his power
To leave the figure or disfigure it.
Demetrius is a worthy gentleman.

HERMIA So is Lysander.

THESEUS In himself he is.
But in this kind, wanting your father's voice,
The other must be held the worthier.

HERMIA I would my father looked but with my eyes.

THESEUS Rather your eyes must with his judgement look.

HERMIA I do entreat your grace to pardon me.
I know not by what power I am made bold,
Nor how it may concern my modesty
In such a presence here to plead my thoughts:
But I beseech your grace that I may know
The worst that may befall me in this case,
If I refuse to wed Demetrius.

THESEUS Either to die the death or to abjure
Forever the society of men.
Therefore, fair Hermia, question your desires,
Know of your youth, examine well your blood,
Whether, if you yield not to your father's choice,
You can endure the livery of a nun,
For aye to be in shady cloister mewed,
To live a barren sister all your life,
Chanting faint hymns to the cold fruitless moon.
Thrice blessèd they that master so their blood,
To undergo such maiden pilgrimage.
But earthlier happy is the rose distilled
Than that which withering on the virgin thorn
Grows, lives and dies in single blessedness.

HERMIA So will I grow, so live, so die, my lord,
Ere I will yield my virgin patent up
Unto his lordship, whose unwishèd yoke
My soul consents not to give sovereignty.

THESEUS Take time to pause, and by the next new
moon -
The sealing day betwixt my love and me,
For everlasting bond of fellowship -
Upon that day either prepare to die
For disobedience to your father's will,
Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would,
Or on Diana's altar to protest
For aye austerity and single life.

DEMETRIUS Relent, sweet Hermia.- And, Lysander, yield
Thy crazèd title to my certain right.

LYSANDER You have her father's love, Demetrius:
Let me have Hermia's. Do you marry him.

EGEUS Scornful Lysander! True, he hath my love;
And what is mine my love shall render him.
And she is mine, and all my right of her
I do estate unto Demetrius.

LYSANDER I am, my lord, as well derived as he,
As well possessed: my love is more than his,
My fortunes every way as fairly ranked,
If not with vantage, as Demetrius',
And, which is more than all these boasts can be,
I am beloved of beauteous Hermia.
Why should not I then prosecute my right?
Demetrius, I'll avouch it to his head,
Made love to Nedar's daughter, Helena,
And won her soul: and she, sweet lady, dotes,
Devoutly dotes, dotes in idolatry,
Upon this spotted and inconstant man.

THESEUS I must confess that I have heard so much,
And with Demetrius thought to have spoke thereof,
But, being over-full of self-affairs,
My mind did lose it. But, Demetrius, come,
And come, Egeus, you shall go with me.
I have some private schooling for you both.
For you, fair Hermia, look you arm yourself
To fit your fancies to your father's will,
Or else the law of Athens yields you up -
Which by no means we may extenuate -
To death or to a vow of single life.-
Come, my Hippolyta. What cheer, my love?-
Demetrius and Egeus, go along:
I must employ you in some business
Against our nuptial and confer with you
Of something nearly that concerns yourselves.

EGEUS With duty and desire we follow you.

Exeunt all but Lysander and Hermia

LYSANDER How now, my love! Why is your cheek so pale?
How chance the roses there do fade so fast?

HERMIA Belike for want of rain, which I could well
Beteem them from the tempest of mine eyes.

LYSANDER Ay me, for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth.
But either it was different in blood-

HERMIA O cross! Too high to be enthralled to low.

LYSANDER Or else misgraffèd in respect of years-

HERMIA O spite! Too old to be engaged to young.

LYSANDER Or else it stood upon the choice of merit-

HERMIA O hell! To choose love by another's eyes.

LYSANDER Or if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death or sickness did lay siege to it,
Making it momentary as a sound,
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream:
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That in a spleen unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say 'Behold!'
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.

HERMIA If then true lovers have been ever crossed,
It stands as an edict in destiny.
Then let us teach our trial patience,
Because it is a customary cross,
As due to love as thoughts and dreams and sighs,
Wishes and tears, poor fancy's followers.

LYSANDER A good persuasion. Therefore hear me,
Hermia.
I have a widow aunt, a dowager
Of great revenue, and she hath no child.
From Athens is her house removed seven leagues,
And she respects me as her only son.
There, gentle Hermia, may I marry thee,
And to that place the sharp Athenian law
Cannot pursue us. If thou lov'st me, then
Steal forth thy father's house tomorrow night,
And in the wood, a league without the town,
Where I did meet thee once with Helena,
To do observance to a morn of May,
There will I stay for thee.

HERMIA My good Lysander!
I swear to thee, by Cupid's strongest bow,
By his best arrow with the golden head,
By the simplicity of Venus' doves,
By that which knitteth souls and prospers love,
And by that fire which burned the Carthage queen,
When the false Troyan under sail was seen,
By all the vows that ever men have broke,
In number more than ever women spoke,
In that same place thou hast appointed me,
Tomorrow truly will I meet with thee.

LYSANDER Keep promise, love. Look, here comes Helena.

Enter Helena


HERMIA God speed fair Helena, whither away?

HELENA Call you me fair? That fair again unsay.
Demetrius loves your fair: O happy fair!
Your eyes are lodestars, and your tongue's sweet air
More tuneable than lark to shepherd's ear
When wheat is green, when hawthorn buds appear.
Sickness is catching: O, were favour so,
Your words I catch, fair Hermia, ere I go,
My ear should catch your voice, my eye your eye,
My tongue should catch your tongue's sweet melody.
Were the world mine, Demetrius being bated,
The rest I'll give to be to you translated.
O, teach me how you look, and with what art
You sway the motion of Demetrius' heart.

HERMIA I frown upon him, yet he loves me still.

HELENA O, that your frowns would teach my smiles such
skill!

HERMIA I give him curses, yet he gives me love.

HELENA O, that my prayers could such affection move!

HERMIA The more I hate, the more he follows me.

HELENA The more I love, the more he hateth me.

HERMIA His folly, Helena, is none of mine.

HELENA None, but your beauty: would that fault were
mine!

HERMIA Take comfort: he no more shall see my face.
Lysander and myself will fly this place.
Before the time I did Lysander see,
Seemed Athens like a paradise to me.
O, then, what graces in my love do dwell,
That he hath turned a heaven into hell!

LYSANDER Helen, to you our minds we will unfold:
Tomorrow night, when Phoebe doth behold
Her silver visage in the wat'ry glass,
Decking with liquid pearl the bladed grass,
A time that lovers' flights doth still conceal,
Through Athens' gates have we devised to steal.

HERMIA And in the wood, where often you and I
Upon faint primrose beds were wont to lie,
Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,
There my Lysander and myself shall meet,
And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,
To seek new friends and strange companions.
Farewell, sweet playfellow: pray thou for us,
And good luck grant thee thy Demetrius! -
Keep word, Lysander: we must starve our sight
From lovers' food till morrow deep midnight. Exit

LYSANDER I will, my Hermia.- Helena, adieu.
As you on him, Demetrius dote on you! Exit

HELENA How happy some o'er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so:
He will not know what all but he doth know.
And as he errs, doting on Hermia's eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
Nor hath love's mind of any judgement taste,
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is often beguiled.
As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,
So the boy love is perjured everywhere.
For ere Demetrius looked on Hermia's eyne,
He hailed down oaths that he was only mine.
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolved, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia's flight:
Then to the wood will he tomorrow night
Pursue her; and for this intelligence,
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again. Exit

[Act 1 Scene 2]
running scene 2

Enter Quince the carpenter, Snug the joiner, Bottom the weaver, Flute the bellows-mender, Snout the tinker and Starveling the tailor

QUINCE Is all our company here?

BOTTOM You were best to call them generally, man by man, according to the scrip.

QUINCE Here is the scroll of every man's name, which is thought fit through all Athens to play in our interlude before the duke and the duchess on his wedding day at night.

BOTTOM First, good Peter Quince, say what the play treats on, then read the names of the actors, and so grow on to a point.

QUINCE Marry, our play is 'The most lamentable comedy and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisbe.'

BOTTOM A very good piece of work, I assure you, and a merry. Now, good Peter Quince, call forth your actors by the scroll. Masters, spread yourselves.

QUINCE Answer as I call you. Nick Bottom, the weaver.

BOTTOM Ready. Name what part I am for, and proceed.

QUINCE You, Nick Bottom, are set down for Pyramus.

BOTTOM What is Pyramus, a lover or a tyrant?

QUINCE A lover that kills himself most gallantly for love.

BOTTOM That will ask some tears in the true performing of it. If I do it, let the audience look to their eyes: I will move storms; I will condole in some measure. To the rest - yet my chief humour is for a tyrant: I could play Ercles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to make all split.

The raging rocks

And shivering shocks

Shall break the locks

Of prison gates.

And Phibbus' car

Shall shine from far

And make and mar

The foolish Fates.

This was lofty. Now name the rest of the players. This is Ercles' vein, a tyrant's vein: a lover is more condoling.

QUINCE Francis Flute, the bellows-mender.

FLUTE Here, Peter Quince.

QUINCE You must take Thisbe on you.

FLUTE What is Thisbe? A wand'ring knight?

QUINCE It is the lady that Pyramus must love.

FLUTE Nay, faith, let not me play a woman: I have a beard coming.

QUINCE That's all one. You shall play it in a mask, and you may speak as small as you will.

BOTTOM An I may hide my face, let me play Thisbe too. I'll speak in a monstrous little voice. 'Thisne, Thisne!' 'Ah, Pyramus, my lover dear! Thy Thisbe dear and lady dear!'

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Table of Contents

Introduction, with new section on recent stage and critical interpretations; Note on the text; List of characters; The play; Textual analysis; Appendix: A further note on sources; Reading list.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2003

    Amazing!

    I read this book last year and must say it is by far the greatest book i'ver ever read so far. Don't be intimidated by the language, though it looks a bit difficult it's quite easy (this is coming from a 13 year old!). I haven't read any other shakespeare books yet but i plan on reading a few more. The characters and plot were great. It is a comedy with love and deception almost like watching an episode of Jerry Springer. It was a great read and i reccomend it to anyone willing to take the time to understand the language.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream

    This is my favorite edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream. I am the Artistic Director of Storefront Shakespeare and this is the edition I am using with my actors in our current production.
    I chose this particular edition because the editors Paul Werstine and Barbara A. Mowat strove to stay as close as possible to the original Quarto (the very first publication) only changing things that were obvious typos.
    It is also helpful to actors and casual readers alike because the right hand pages have the script and the left hand pages have explanations of unfamiliar words or terms. This is very useful for actors because they need to understand what they are saying in order to properly communicate it to an audience.
    I highly recommend the Folger Shakespeare Library (and their website) to anyone who is interested in the Bard.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    G

    I read this book when I was in fifth grade in my class of about seven last year (we were supposedly advanced). I really enjoyed it and recommend it to ages ten and up. Maybe I stretched that age catergory a little. Good job will!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 22, 2010

    Pretty good

    Shakespeare annoys me a bit, but this is a great comedy. For actors, so many different approaches can be used for this story. Shakespeare creates a dreamy, whimsical world that I really enjoyed reading. Very good.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2005

    Great Book! Folger Makes It Possible To Better Understand!

    This book is awsome. Buy the Folger edition if you are a student or just want to have everything explained.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 3, 2012

    look at this review

    Book Review
    Book title and author: A Midsummer Nights Dream. William Shakespeare
    Title of review: Michaels book review on a midsummers night dream.
    Number of stars (1 to 5): 4

    Introduction
    The book a Middsumer nights dream is abought dream is abought three couples.They all are in a love triangle there is a lot of problems that comes befor them all. There are the faires in there world that do things to the charecters in the play .There is Helena,Hermia,Lysander,Puck,Thesis, Bottom, snug,.These are most of the charecters in the play.
    Description and summary of main points
    The book is abought couple people in love with one another but the person each likes some one else .it has a lot of points that are really interesting .The couples go through a lot just to try to be with the person they love.Its veary intersting .
    Evaluation I think this book is really good because it’s a love triangle and they go through a lot it’s a interesting book because there is a lot of main points thAT CAN REALLY INTEREST A READER you need to read this book to find out the crazy ending
    Conclusion You should read this book because its it’s a love triangle and it will interest you if you like shakesphere its iteresting because the book has a big twist at the but you will have to read the book to find out what it is trust me you will like the book and the ending and it’s a good book to read in an reading class

    Your final review
    You should read this book because its verry interesting and good because its a good book to teach to a reading class

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Shakespears play

    Your final review
    To me this book is wonderful if you like love stories and plays I reprehend it to you if you do. Book title and author: A Midsummer Night’s Dream-William Shakespeare
    Title of review: Shakespeare Play
    Number of stars (1 to 5): 4

    Introduction
    This story is about a play with Lysander who is in love with Hermia, Demetrius who is also in love with Hermia, and Hermia who’s in love with Lysander, and Helena who is in love with Demetrius.
    Description and summary of main points
    It all starts out as the couples, Demetrius and Helena, and Lysander with Hermia all run off because they want to get married and it takes place in the forest at night because night is more like a romantic time. A problem starts to accrue when Demetrius tells Lysander that he is in love with Hermia and then it all switches to them both falling in love with Helena.
    Evaluation
    When Hermia finds out about it she thinks it’s all Helena’s fault and they get in an argument over it. Then Lysander and Demetrius decide to fight over her. Then at the end there is a play that ends the story.
    Conclusion
    This book is more like a love triangle between couples.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Shakespeare :)

    It is a Shakespeare play, and as all his works, it provides an experience that lends the reader a frame of history. A comedy, this play has its memorable characters, be it Bottom or Robin, that take the reader on a journey from a callous court world into the realm of the Green World's forest. Portraying the unyielding voice of a father's will and the recalcitrance of a young girl very much in love, A Midsummer Night's Dream is a story of love that provides commentary on its absurdities. Certainly one of the easier plays to follow, I recommend this as an Introduction to any reader that cares to venture into the world of Shakespeare.
    This addition provides an excellent companion on each page in order to aid the reader in understanding the material. The editor's introduction gives the reader a look into the times of Shakespeare, and refers to the possible explanations for this play, as well provides a background for William's audience. Be forewarned: The Introduction contains spoilers, so perhaps its better to read it after you've completed the play yourself.

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  • Posted February 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A morel to be learned

    Even though this book takes alot of analizing, once you understand the story your heart and soul goes into it! The end would extremly capture your mind and your heart will feel good. Shakespear can also be read for enjoyment like other books. I recomened students to read Shakespeare for fun and respond to it themselfs. This was my favorite!!!!!

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  • Posted June 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    your bound to read shakespeare

    In school there will come a time when you'll have to read Shakespeare. A midsummer night's dream is funny at times.(mostly because of how ridiculous the story gets).Make sure you understand who's in love with who since this changes many times throughout the book.This edition is a good choice since it has notes that help you understand the Shakespearean language better.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2003

    A Word From A Bottom

    This was a very great story and the Folgier Library edition is wonderful. I played the charectar Bottom in a reproduction of this play and it has help me to understand what certain phrases and words mean by the notes that are written next to each page.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2002

    This will make you Love Shakepeare!

    This book was sooo great! The story is cute, charming, and funny. And the movie (newest version w/ Calistia Flockhart) is absolutely fabulous!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2002

    GOOD TALE

    I have not read this for years but it's truely excellent!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2001

    one of shakespeare's best

    a romantic comedy that anyone would enjouy Just fun!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2001

    midsummers night dream summary

    About lovers who are not able to get married because of her(Hermia's) father would like her to marry the man of his choice (demetrius) instead of her love (lysandder) tehy run off together (lysander&hermia) and then fairies put spells on demetrius so he loves anotehr woman named helena and then the father lets hermia marry lysander. Happy ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2000

    A Midsummer Night's Romp In The Woods

    This is one of my all-time favorite Shakespeare plays. The theme of romance(with a little magical help)is very evident in the story. It's very entertaining- even if you're just reading it. As an actor, one of my goals is to perform in this play, mostly in the role of Nick Bottom, a pompous actor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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