A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812 [NOOK Book]

Overview

Drawing on the diaries of a midwife and healer in eighteenth-century Maine, this intimate history illuminates the medical practices, household economies, religious rivalries, and sexual mores of the New England frontier.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

On the basis of a diary, Ulrich gives the reader an intimate and densely imagined portrait of the industrious...

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A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812

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Overview

Drawing on the diaries of a midwife and healer in eighteenth-century Maine, this intimate history illuminates the medical practices, household economies, religious rivalries, and sexual mores of the New England frontier.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

On the basis of a diary, Ulrich gives the reader an intimate and densely imagined portrait of the industrious and reticent Martha Ballard and her society--a portrait that sheds light on its medical practices, religious squabbles and sexual mores. A winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The diary of a midwife and herbalist reveals the prevalence of violence, crime and premarital sex in rural 18th-century New England. ``Fleshing out this midwife's bare entries with interpretive essays . . . Ulrich marvelously illuminates women's status, the history of medicine and daily life in the early Republic,'' said PW . Illustrated. June
Library Journal
This book is a model of social history at its best. An exegesis of Ballard's diary, it recounts the life and times of this obscure Maine housewife and midwife. Using passages from the diary as a starting point for each chapter division, Ulrich, a professor at the University of New Hampshire, demonstrates how the seemingly trivial details of Ballard's daily life reflect and relate to prominent themes in the history of the early republic: the role of women in the economic life of the community, the nature of marriage and sexual relations, the scope of medical knowledge and practice. Speculating on why Ballard kept the diary as well as why her family saved it, Ulrich highlights the document's usefulness for historians.-- Marie Marmo Mullaney, Caldwell Coll., N.J.
From the Publisher
"A major source through which we can vicariously experience the rural life of early New England." —Carl N. Degler, The New York Times Book Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307772985
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/22/2010
  • Series: Vintage
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 156,489
  • File size: 3 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 31, 2011

    Highly recommended if you love American history

    I originally read this book in 1995 and it has stayed with me ever since. This book impacted me so much in regards to women's history. The research that the author did is incredible. As the reader, you must be patient with the details because it is all worth it in the end. This book will impact your every day life in modern America.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2007

    A Glimpse of the Life of a Women in Early America

    Sometimes we get the idea that women really had it quite bad in Colonial and Early American Society. True, they had secondary status in the eyes of the law and the church. If one, however, reads the diary of Martha Ballard, as presented to us by Professor Ulrich, we catch a glimpse of the kind of empowerment some women could have in that time. Martha Ballard illustrated just how vital a women was to the existence of the American household during her lifetime. Taking away, for a moment, that she had a very successful midwifing practice, women contributed to the general welfare of the family, and even the economy, by their industriousness. Women's household chores, which seem so mundane to everyone today, actually allowed families to sustain themselves quite well. What a woman produced in the home, hopefully in excess, could then be turned around and traded within their community for other items which would provide for the family. Men, on the other hand, typically worked for wage labor and then came home to do what little they could during the rest of the day. Or, men farmed all day and did not have the time nor energy to do what the women of the household did. So, if the women then did not do their portion of their work, the family would be in serious jeopardy of depravation. Also, you will see how instrumental the children of a home were in the survival of the family and also how children were raised and trained for adulthood. However, when you couple into the mix Martha Ballard's mid-wifing practice, which as you will read was quite successful at its peak, Ballard was someone who could then exercise greater influence within the family because of her increased earning power. So, this book can provide a great insight into family life in Early American New England. And maybe, you will understand how women were empowered in other ways.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2000

    A Not So Ordinary Woman

    I saw the Movie on TV and than read the book.I found Martha Ballard's so called common life not so common. She was an extraordinary person who was thoughtful, consistent, and willing to sacrifice many sleepless nights and treks through inclement weather to assist women in childbirth. Not only that, she was a 'counselor' of sorts. I found reading Miss Thatcher's painstakingly researched account and interpretation of the diary an inspiration to readers as well as writers. As a 'housewife, mother, and teacher's aide' among other things, I can relate to Martha's way of life. The diary in itself is priceless.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    I read A Midwife¿s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on He

    I read A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812. It’s chock full of details of life, disease, injuries, and deaths as the pilgrims experienced them. The midwife monitored pregnancies, delivered babies, and cared for infants, toddlers, and children, many of whom died. Occasionally, a physician came from Boston to check on the scattered communities, most of them struggling every day to survive the hardships of pioneering, farming, and brutal weather. For the other 350 days a year, the midwife was a walking medical clinic. She was often called to care for sick and dying elders, or to patch together young and old adults who were horribly injured by dangerous equipment, or protesting farm animals. In times of epidemics, Ballard was the closest thing the community had to a doctor; she did her best, intervening with herbs, broths, medical skills, and prayers to stop epidemics. Her diary is fascinating; she kept meticulous records of the people and the results of their care. Submitted by: 10_TeePeez

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2004

    Informative and Interesting

    I could tell that a lot of work went into writing this book. I've done a lot of research on midwifery and this was the first detailed nonfiction book I could find from the 18th century. I found the material listed in the back of the book very helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2003

    Reading in Oklahoma

    Martha Ballard's Diary had been, apparently, discredited as useful until Ms. Ulrich exhaustively researched and presented this information. It felt at times a bit like taking medicine to read. I was amazed at how the female economy and education worked. It is a rare treatise and insight that has made me continue to think about what I read in this book, moreover to talk to others about the similarites in the behavior of people then and now. I can recommend it. Stick with it, a treasury of information unfolds.

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    Posted February 10, 2011

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    Posted April 7, 2009

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    Posted October 25, 2008

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    Posted December 11, 2008

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    Posted July 11, 2014

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    Posted December 10, 2009

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