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A (Somewhat Irreverent) Introduction to Philosophy for Medical Students and Other Busy People
     

A (Somewhat Irreverent) Introduction to Philosophy for Medical Students and Other Busy People

by Niall McLaren
 

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During their careers, many students become aware that, lurking in the background, there are complex and conceptually difficult questions that, all too often, their teachers either can't answer, or can't even understand. These are traditionally the questions addressed by philosophy, and this little primer is the result of another student's journey over many years.

Overview

During their careers, many students become aware that, lurking in the background, there are complex and conceptually difficult questions that, all too often, their teachers either can't answer, or can't even understand. These are traditionally the questions addressed by philosophy, and this little primer is the result of another student's journey over many years. Niall McLaren MD has spent over three decades banging his head against the Really Difficult questions behind psychiatry, and offers his a personal view of how these questions should be approached. Very deliberately, he simplifies the convoluted language and reasoning that set philosophers apart, making it accessible to students of scientific fields in particular.

In this book, you will gain a background in the following fields:
* Religion and the origins of philosophy
* Mentalism, antimentalism and behaviorism
* Epistemology, as the study of knowledge itself
* Philosophy and the nature of science
* Philosophy and the nature of ethics

Included is a glossary explaining some of the many -isms that can be so daunting to non-philosophers because philosophers too have their jargon but it is not meant to intimidate. True, it can be complex, but the issues involved are complex. The goal of this book is to show that, with clear thinking, the complexities need not be overwhelming.

From Future Psychiatry Press
www.FuturePsychiatry.com

Editorial Reviews

Sam Vaknin PhD
This is one of the very few books I have every intention of reading several
times in rapid succession. It is such a bounty of iconoclastic observations
emanating from an in-depth acquaintance with psychiatry and a love of philosophy that no single reading can do it justice: it just keeps giving. McLaren has a knack for popularizing the most somniferous and plodding arguments and rendering them great and thrilling fun.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940014309189
Publisher:
Loving Healing Press
Publication date:
03/14/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
140
File size:
785 KB

Meet the Author

Despite anything you have heard, the author is not an “antipsychiatrist.” He is a fully qualified, fully paid up and fully engaged psychiatrist in private practice in Darwin, in Australia's remote north. He is, however, virulently opposed to bad psychiatry, and would not object to being called an “anti-bad-psychiatrist.” Practically the whole of psychiatry in the world today is bad. It is, indeed, very bad, and the reason has been established by philosophy. Specifically, psychiatry is not a science just because it fails every known test of what constitutes a science. The question of what constitutes a science is known as the philosophy of science, so philosophers come in handy after all.
Jock McLaren was born in a tiny town in the wheat belt of Western Australia and went to school in a slightly larger town on the far south coast of WA. He studied medicine at the University of WA and then psychiatry, graduating in 1977. He has been in full-time practice ever since, including five years in a Veterans' hospital and six years as the Regional Psychiatrist in WA's remote Kimberley Region, before he moved to Darwin. He lives in the bush out of Darwin with his family and various wild animals, including the family cat. Because there isn't a lot to do in the bush at night, he writes papers and books with a philosophical bent which are uniformly loathed and ignored by the mainstream of psychiatry.

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