A Passage to India

A Passage to India

3.1 45
by E. M. Forster
     
 

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E. M. Forster's exquisitely observed novel about the clash of cultures and the consequences of perception, set in colonial India

Among the greatest novels of the twentieth century and the basis for director David Lean’s Academy Award–winning film, A Passage to India unravels the growing racial tension between Indians, uneasy at best with

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Overview

E. M. Forster's exquisitely observed novel about the clash of cultures and the consequences of perception, set in colonial India

Among the greatest novels of the twentieth century and the basis for director David Lean’s Academy Award–winning film, A Passage to India unravels the growing racial tension between Indians, uneasy at best with colonial power, and the British, largely ignorant and dismissive of the society they're infiltrating. A sudden moment of confusion results in a devastating series of events that threatens to ruin a man's life, revealing just how deeply—and swiftly—prejudice has taken root.

Editorial Reviews

Herbert S. Gorman
A single reading of A Passage to India settles the question. Mr. E. M. Forster is indubitably one of the finest novelists living in England today, and A Passage to India is one of the saddest, keenest, most beautifully written ironic novels of the time. . . . [It] is both a challenge and an indictment. It is also a revelation. -- Books of the Century; New York Times review, August 1924
Library Journal
Du Bois's 1903 classic is one of many large-print standards being released by Transaction. Other new titles in the series include Sir Walter Scott's Rob Roy (ISBN 1-56000-523-8), Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (ISBN 1-56000-517-3), H.G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau (ISBN 1-56000-515-7), Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey (ISBN 1-56000-507-8), E.M. Forster's A Passage to India (ISBN 1-56000-507-6), and Scott Fitzgerald's The Ice Palace and Other Stories (ISBN 1-56000-511-4). These are available in a mixture of paperback and hardcovers, with prices ranging from $17.95 to $24.95.
From the Publisher
A Passage to India is one of the great books of the twentieth century and has had enormous influence. We need its message of tolerance and understanding now more than ever. Forster was years ahead of his time, and we ought to try to catch up with him.” –Margaret Drabble

“The crystal clear portraiture, the delicate conveying of nuances of thought and life, and the astonishing command of his medium show Forster at the height of his powers.” –The New York Times

“[Forster is] a supreme storyteller . . . The novel seems to me more completely ‘achieved’ than anything else he wrote.” –from the new Introduction by P. N. Furbank

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156711425
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/28/1965
Series:
Abinger Edition of E. M. Forster Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
72,779
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.89(d)
Lexile:
950L (what's this?)

What People are saying about this

Margaret Drabble
A Passage to India is one of the great books of the twentieth century and has had enormous influence. We need its message of tolerance and understanding now more than ever. Forster was years ahead of his time, and we ought to try to catch up with him.

Meet the Author


E.M. Forster (1879-1970) was an English novelist and short story writer who won international acclaim for his well-plotted novels dealing with ideas of class and race.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 1, 1879
Date of Death:
June 7, 1970
Place of Birth:
London
Place of Death:
Coventry, England
Education:
B. A. in classics, King's College, Cambridge, 1900; B. A. in history, 1901; M.A., 1910

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A Passage To India 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a great example of how the injection of western influences and domination throw the equilbruim of societies into a state of disarray. The europeans took over rule in many countries trying to force the native cultures into adopting their rules and laws. The domination of western peoples also created its own class structures with them on top. This initiated racism and a hierarchy of social classes. The perceptions of the native peoples even caused them to turn on their own at times. Due to their discontent from the structural conditions of the subjunation of their culture by the British, the Indians used the incident this book centers around to spark a rebellion against western intervention on their way of life. The clashing of cultures due to the integration of western ideologies with the basic belief systems of India caused immense stress on the native people of India. A must for anyone studying the emergence of western ideals in other non-western nations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'A Passage to India' is not only a story, it is a glimpse of the prejudices that have haunted British India since its addition to the British Empire. The story is well-written, and its message is Forster's most profound to date.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Written in 1924, this book offers an excellent presentation of social constructs in Colonial India from both the British and Indian perspectives. It was fascinating to see how various actions and situations were interpreted by members of the two different civilisations. When one reads this book keeping in mind the period in which it appeared, it is amazing to note just how ahead of its time it was. Ideas presented, such as the notion that India might one day be a nation instead of several very different groups of people¿Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, are really quite revolutionary. While events did not transpire quite as the book may have alluded to (Colonial India was made of up the present-day nations of India and Pakistan, which came about after a very bloody war- hence two nations not one), they are nonetheless far ahead of their times. While I encourage everyone to read this book for the very candid insights into the mindsets of British Colonials and Indians of the time period, I did not give this book a 5 for several reasons. Firstly, the use of many foreign words (of Urdu origin I presume), while adding flavour to the story also made reading a bit difficult as I was unfamiliar with many of them, and could not find them in and English dictionary. It was a bit confusing as many of the words were not explained. Secondly, in my opinion there were large passages where nothing of import was said. This, unfortunately, did not add to the reading experience for me. This aside, I do think it is a book worth reading, especially for its status as a modern classic and the unique point of view from which it is written.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found Passage, written in 1924, a fine book, although, unlike many of the other 'Classics' I've recently consumed, I doubt that I will remember anything from its pages. In order to completely understand the story of Passage, I resorted to using two dictionaries, as my 75,000 word Funk & Wagnalls often did not contain the needed word and I was forced to reach for an unabridged volume. The real action, the crux of the book, doesn't occur until about one hundred pages and twelve chapters in, and then it flies by as fast as a bat chasing a locust. The climax comes at page 188, but the book drags on for another eighty pages, with the writer hinting that there just might be a shocking twist at the end. There isn't. Often I could not comprehend who was speaking, and the author, using several names for the same person, sometimes further confused my simple mind. E. M. Forster's analogies were almost always bland, but maybe that is a factor of the book having been written over eighty years ago. I found A Passage to India not up to the caliber of the other titles I have recently read that fall into that vague category of 'Literature'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In my opinion I really liked E.M. Forster's A Passage to India. I really couldn't get into the book because it was pretty confusing. So I bought the movie and it was really good. My favorite charater was Doc. Aziz. In my opinion, if you want to know about India in the 1920's read the book or better yet if you don't get the book buy the movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel, is not one to criticize and detest to the utmost degree...but more a book that has tremendous potential. I had to do a project on this one, and as much as some parts 'did drag on' it was an interesting read. You definitly get a first hand look at the racial tensions that go on between the British and the Indians. You see different religious perspectives from muslims, christians, and hindus. You get to experience something a bit different. The language really wasn't that confusing. If you had background knowledge upon British India it might have helped a bit more...but really, it wasn't that bad. The characters were all very well developed and you begin to sense the conflicting view points among all the characters. The characters are not flawless, but very believable. All in all...it has tremedous potential...the symbols, setting, and plot show that human nature no matter how sweet it intends to be...always has its drawbacks due to social pressures and such. good book...though it seems people usually tend to expect more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book ruined by too many typos
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Hard to read but seems to be corrected but have had odd copies before including poetry in prose paragraphs and scrambled with symbols almost unreadable and a few all. Usually under five dollars. Beware any book whose blurb has any scrambles or symbols or number in text
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