A Patriot's A to Z of America: Things Every Good American Should Know

A Patriot's A to Z of America: Things Every Good American Should Know

by Ed Moser
     
 

America is a nation of firsts, from its pioneering innovation in technology and science to its politics, social affairs, and culture. But despite its intriguing and unique history, many Americans aren't as well-versed as they think they are when it comes to knowledge of the monumental events, people, and ideas that shaped this revolutionary country. Chock-full of

Overview

America is a nation of firsts, from its pioneering innovation in technology and science to its politics, social affairs, and culture. But despite its intriguing and unique history, many Americans aren't as well-versed as they think they are when it comes to knowledge of the monumental events, people, and ideas that shaped this revolutionary country. Chock-full of surprising snippets of history you should know about, A Patriot's A to Z of America: Things Every Good American Should Know is the eye-opening remedy for every aspiring good American, featuring heroic events and creative individuals who surmounted great difficulties to achieve great things going to the moon, wiring the planet, defeating the Nazis, setting up the first large democratic republic, and largely banishing starvation overseas achievements of which no other nation can boast. Organized from A to Z, these exceptional tales are America's to tell and for you to discover.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The best description of America I’ve ever seen. Like Americans and their history, Moser’s writing is both brief and deep, sharp though blunt, and clear-sighted while still being starry- (and stripey-) eyed.” —P. J. O'Rourke

“A witty look at U.S. history.”Publishers Weekly, about The Politically Correct Guide to American History by Edward P. Moser

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596525498
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
11/15/2011
Pages:
302
Sales rank:
1,250,163
Product dimensions:
5.12(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.74(d)

Read an Excerpt

Presidents had no Secret Service, and often no bodyguards, back in 1881. So when an assassin with a loaded pistol stepped up to President Garfield at a downtown Washington train depot that July, the Chief Executive had no defense. Shot twice at point-blank range, Garfield was soon fighting for his life.
Yankee ingenuity emerged, as some of the country’s best thinkers fought to save the President’s life. A team of Navy engineers put together a prototype air-conditioner to blow cool air over the sweating, bedridden Garfield. In trying to locate and remove a bullet buried in Garfield’s abdomen, doctors turned to a 34-year-old scientist, who quickly devised the first metal detector.
Due to the metal in the President’s bed frame, the detector failed in its task. But Americans saddened by the Garfield tragedy thought back with pride to the scientist’s great triumph in Boston five years before.

A Master of Speech Trains with the Deaf
The man, named Aleck, born and raised in Scotland, had accompanied his family to Canada in 1870 after a tragedy of his own. Both his brothers had died of tuberculosis, and he himself had contracted the disease. His father took his son Aleck, along with the rest of the family, to recuperate in Ontario.
Adept in many fields, Aleck was a noted instructor of sign language to deaf-mute students. After regaining his health, he traveled to Boston, and in 1872 set up the School of Vocal Physiology and Mechanics of Speech.
Communication skills ran deep in his family. His grandfather was an actor. His father was the author of a well-known book on teaching the deaf to lip-read and to speak. His mother, though herself deaf, was a skilled pianist.
As a youth, Aleck and a friend constructed, from scraps of rubber and wood, a toy robot that could enunciate words like “mama.” Playing with the family terrier, Aleck got it to make English-like sounds by manipulating its vocal chords and lips. In Boston, one of his handicapped students was the blind-and-deaf child turned author, Helen Keller. He spent much of his free time tinkering with telegraphs and other electrical devices.
Long-distance communications were then in the hands of the telegraph companies, who were eager to cut costs by finding a way of sending multiple messages at once. In 1873, Aleck decided to focus on his research in that field. He cut back his students to two: six-year-old Georgie Sanders and 15-year-old Mabel Hubbard—the fathers of both girls bankrolled his extracurricular work.
Laboring for long hours in his workshop, nagged by headaches, Aleck came upon a new way of communication by wire—with the human voice.

Meet the Author

Edward P. Moser has served as a speechwriter to President George H. W. Bush and writer for Jay Leno’s The Tonight Show. The author of the “Politically Correct Guide to” series, Edward has cowritten seven other books, and his articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. Edward earned his M.A. in International Affairs from George Washington University and his B.A. in journalism from SUNY at Albany. He resides in Alexandria, Virginia.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >