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A Picasso Anthology: Documents, Criticism, Reminiscences

Overview

Picasso's extraordinary capacity to work in a variety of mediums and styles has amazed his critics since the first years of the century. This collection of critical and personal reactions to Picasso at every stage of his career provides a remarkable account of the many innovations and changes of direction that baffled his contemporaries. Picasso's working methods and his attitudes to his own art are also revealed in conversations and in letters and statements by his closest ...

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Overview

Picasso's extraordinary capacity to work in a variety of mediums and styles has amazed his critics since the first years of the century. This collection of critical and personal reactions to Picasso at every stage of his career provides a remarkable account of the many innovations and changes of direction that baffled his contemporaries. Picasso's working methods and his attitudes to his own art are also revealed in conversations and in letters and statements by his closest friends.

A Picasso Anthology contains a wide range and variety of contemporary responses to Picasso and his art. There are essential passages from books by his close friends, including Apollinaire, Cocteau, and Roland Penrose; an important body of Catalan and Spanish criticism; reactions from English critics, including Roger Fry and John Middleton; a remarkable collection of Russian criticism of his cubist work, written in the years just before the Revolution; and Czech, Danish, and Italian articles, as well as mainstream texts from France and Germany.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The editors of this truly unique volume on Picasso have assembled a remarkable number of documents and ephemera that, in combination, provide a full picture of the impression Picasso made on a wide audience. Critics and friends discuss his need to constantly reinvent his style and approach, the development of his craft over time, and his influence on the rich assortment of cultural revolutionaries he knew.
The New Yorker
The hundred or so brief documents collected here, dating back to 1900, are a kind of Richter-scale recording of Picasso's impact on this century.
The Wilson Quarterly
Sheds light not only on Picasso, but also on those others—Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau, and Salvador Dali—who interpreted and influenced the master's art.
From the Publisher

"The hundred or so brief documents collected here, dating back to 1900, are a kind of Richter-scale recording of Picasso's impact on this century."--The New Yorker

"Sheds light not only on Picasso, but also on those others--Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau, and Salvador Dali--who interpreted and influenced the master's art."--The Wilson Quarterly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691003481
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/1997
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.19 (w) x 9.39 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Table of Contents


Introduction
I. The early years Jaime Sabartes
(1897) On Science and Charity
Manuel Rodriguez Codola
1900 Els IV Gats: Ruiz Picazzo Exhibition
Sebastia Trullol i Plana
1900 Picasso at Els Quatre Gats
Unidentified visitor
1900 Picasso at Els Quatre Gats
Charles Ponsonailhe
1900 Derniers Moments at the Paris Exposition
Carles Casagemas
1900 Letter from Paris (25 October) to Ramon Reventos
Pablo Picasso
Carles Casagemas
1900 Letter from Paris (11 November) to Ramon Reventos
Miquel Utrillo
1901 On Arte Joven Pablo Picasso
1901 Letter from Madrid to Miquel Utrillo
Gustave Coquiot
1901 Review of the exhibition at Vollard's gallery, Paris
Pere Coll
1901 Review of the exhibition at Vollard's gallery, Paris
Pablo Picasso
1901 Letter from Paris (13 July) to Vidal
Ventosa
Max Jacob
(1901) Meeting Picasso in Paris Pablo Picasso
1902 Letter from Barcelona (13 July) to Max Jacob
Pablo Picasso
1903 Letter from Barcelona to Max Jacob
El Liberal
1903 On La Vie
Carlos Juner-Vidal
1904 Picasso and his work
2. Picasso moves to Paris and the development of Cubism Fernande Olivier
(1904) Picasso at the 'Bateau-Lavoir' Pablo Picasso
1905 Letter from Paris (22 February) to Jacinto Reventos
Guillaume Apollinaire
1905 The Young: Picasso, Painter Jaume Pasarell
(1905) Picasso in Tiana
Max Jacob
(1905-7) Picasso, Apollinaire, Salmon and Jacob
Andre Salmon
(1907) On Les Demoiselles d'Avignon
Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler
(1907) On Les Demoiselles d'Avignon Fernande Olivier
(1908) The banquet for Douanier Rousseau Gertrude Stein
(1908) The banquet for Douanier Rousseau Andre Salmon
(1908) Response to Gertrude Stein Georges Braque
(1908-10) Response to Gertrude Stein Gertrude Stein
(1909) Concerning Cubism Fernande Olivier
1910 Letter from Paris (17 June) to Gertrude Stein
Josep Pla
(1910) Manolo on Cubism
Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler
(1910) On Cubism Gino Severini
(1912) On Souvenirs du Havre Guillaume Apollinaire
1913 Picasso, Cubist painter
3. Picasso's critical reputation outside France Roger Fry
1910 The Post-Impressionists: Picasso Arthur Hoeber
1911 Review of Photo-Secession exhibition, New York
The Craftsman
1911 Review of Photo-Secession exhibition, New York
Huntly Carter
1911 The Plato-Picasso Idea
John Middleton Murry
1911 The Art of Pablo Picasso
The Art Chronicle
1912 Review of Stafford Gallery exhibition,
London Roger Fry
1912 The Second Post-Impressionist exhibition Ramon Reventos
1912 Review of Ca'n Dalmau exhibition, Barcelona
Josep Junoy
1912 Picasso's Art
Max Pechstein
1912 What is Picasso up to?
Max Raphael
1912 Open Letter to Herr Pechstein
Ludwig Coellen
1912 Romanticism in Picasso Heinrich Thannhauser
1913 Moderne Galerie exhibition, Munich
M. K. Rohe
1913 Review of Moderne Galerie exhibition,
Munich Wilhelm Bode
1913 The new art of Futurists and Cubists Hans Arp
L. H. Neitzel
1913 The Cubists
4. The war years
Georgy Chulkov
1914 Picasso's demons Yakov Tugendhold
1914 Picassos in the Shchukin collection Nikolay Berdyaev
1914 Picasso
Ivan Aksenov
(1915) Picasso's painting
Jean Cocteau
(1917) Picasso in Rome Enrico Prampolini
(1917) Picasso in Rome Axel Salto
(1916) Visiting Picasso in Paris
Joan Miro
(1919) Visiting Picasso in Paris Guillaume Apollinaire
1917 Calligram Guillaume Apollinaire
1918 Preface to Matisse-Picasso exhibition, Paris
Guillaume Apollinaire
1918 Letter (late summer) to Picasso Guillaume Apollinaire
1918 Letter (4 September) to Picasso Roger Allard
1919 Picasso's latest paintings
5. The twenties Andre Salmon
1920 Picasso
Clive Bell
1920 Picasso as an intellectual artist
Vauvrecy (Amedee Ozenfant)
1921 Picasso's language
Vaclav Nebesky
1921 The nature of space in Picasso's work
Vicenc Kramar
1922 Manes Gallery exhibition, Prague
Vladimir Mayakovsky
1922 Picasso's studio Picasso
1923-4 Statement about art Andre Breton
1925 Picasso and Surrealism
Josep Llorens Artigas
1925 Pau Ruiz Picasso Georgy Yakulov
1926 Picasso Oskar Schurer
1926 Picasso's classicism E. Teriade
1927 Picasso's quest
Carl Einstein
1928 Picasso: the last decade Sebastia Gasch
1928 Picasso
Max J. Friedlander
1929 On style and manner Andre Schaeffner
1930 The man with the clarinet
Leon Pierre-Quint
1930 Doubt and revelation in the work of Picasso
6. The thirties Waldemar George
1931 Picasso's 50th birthday and the death of still life
Carl G. Jung
1932 Picasso Will Grohmann
1932 Dialectic and transcendence in Picasso's work
Carles Capdevila
1934 Picasso at the Barcelona Museum
Salvador Dali
1935 Invitation to the Picasso exhibition, Barcelona
Juli Gonzalez
1935 From Paris Paul Eluard
1935 I speak of what is right Andre Breton
1935 Picasso poet
Eugeni d'Ors
1936 Open letter to Picasso
Christian Zervos
1937 On Guernica Jose Bergamin
1937 The Mystery Trembles: Picasso Furioso Herbert Read
1938 Picasso's Guernica Roland Penrose
(1937) The Woman Weeping
Andre Lhote
1939 Picasso's reputation
7. World War II and after
Wyndham Lewis
1940 On Guernica Jaime Sabartes
(1939) A new portrait Brassai
(1939) On Sabartes' portrait Harriet
Sidney Janis
(1942) On Dora Maar's portrait Brassai
(1943) Conversations with Picasso
Georges Limbour
1944 Picasso at the Autumn Salon Harriet
Sidney Janis
(1944) Picasso's studio John Pudney
1944 Picasso -- A Glimpse in Sunlight Jerome Seckler
1945 Picasso Explains Francoise Gilot
(1946) On La Femme Fleur Tristan Tzara
1947-8 Picasso and the knowledge of space Rene Gaffe
1947-8 Picasso a sculptor? Willy Boers
1947-8 Lithographs by Picasso
Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler
(1948) Talking to Picasso Francoise Gilot
(1949) Aragon and the Dove
Ilya Ehrenburg
(1948-56) Picasso and peace Andre Breton
1961 80 carats... with a single flaw
Maurice Raynal
1952 Picasso's revelation
8. The last twenty years Rosamond Bernier
1955 Picasso on Altdorfer Helene Parmelin
(1955) Concerning Lola de Valence
Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler
(1955) Conversations about the Femmes d'Alger
Michel Leiris
1959 Picasso and Las Meninas by Velazquez
Lionel Prejger
1961 Picasso cuts out iron Georges Sadoul
1961 Picasso as a film-director Roland Penrose
(1963) A monument for Chicago Roland Penrose
1968 Some recent drawings by Picasso Roberto Otero
(1968) On Suite 347 Brassai
1971 The master at 90
Pierre Daix
1973 The last exhibition at Avignon Brassai
Edouard Pignon
Picasso on death
Postscript John Richardson
1980 Picasso: a retrospective view
Abbreviations
Index
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