×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

A Piece Of Blue Sky
     

A Piece Of Blue Sky

4.2 8
by Jon Atack, Russell Miller (Preface by)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Atack exposes Hubbard's bizarre imagination and behavior, tracing the creation of Scientology in the years following World War II to perhaps its final schism following Hubbard's death in 1986. A shocking book that reveals all: the abuses, falsehoods, paranoia, and greed of Hubbard and his pseudo-military Scientologist henchmen.

Overview

Atack exposes Hubbard's bizarre imagination and behavior, tracing the creation of Scientology in the years following World War II to perhaps its final schism following Hubbard's death in 1986. A shocking book that reveals all: the abuses, falsehoods, paranoia, and greed of Hubbard and his pseudo-military Scientologist henchmen.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780818404993
Publisher:
Kensington Publishing Corporation
Publication date:
08/01/1990
Pages:
448
Product dimensions:
1.13(w) x 9.00(h) x 6.00(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

A Piece of Blue Sky 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't miss this amazing inside story into the bizzare, creepy and downright scary cult. This unbelievable yet true story is riveting and frightenting. Hard to believe there are people dumb enough to fall for this and turn over huge amounts of cash to these kooks!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first found this book in the local library. I was doing research on religious cults, and this showed me a cult that scared me. I started recommending this book to my friends, but it has disappeared from the library - I'm told this is a common Scientology tactic. The new printing of this book has made it possible for me to give several new copies to my local public librarys, and the local university. The author of the book has also given his gracious permission to publish this book digitally, for free, on the Internet, in PDF format. Just look for it using any standard search engine!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book exposes the criminal, sinister world of Scientology, as well as lays bare the criminal and insane world of its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. I've read many books about Scientology, and I consider this one of the best for the most factual data available. I HIGHLY recomend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Atack effectively shows just how fraudulent (and often criminal) Scientology is. He also shows how the organization preys on poorly-educated individuals, and how its toxic mix of pseduo-science, a religious mythos derived from pulp Science Fiction, a quasi-military organization and psychological carrot-and-stick tactics draw the ignorant, the easily swayed or the insecure into its grip.

Readers might also want to look at Roy Wallis's 'The Road to Total Freedom: A Sociological Analysis of Scientology.' Wallis has it basically right when he says Scientology began as a lay psychotherapy (the Dianetics part) and developed into an authoritarian sect (the religion part), as Hubbard gradually 'revealed' his further 'discoveries' about the mind, thetans, space aliens, etc, all within the framework of pay-as-you-go coursework designed to take you up the ladder to Operating Thetan status. Such nonsense is hardly to be believed.

Guest More than 1 year ago
Throughout this very informative book, I asked myself that question, but found no satisfactory answer. Granted, the author did a wonderful job exposing the church of scientology as he sees it, but to what end? Sure, it is a bad system, but the people he asserts are drawn to this cult will not read this book; it will not open their eyes. What does he call them? Unintelligent and irrational, or something to that effect. But he does prove it is a bad system. Now I cannot help but wonder whether this book is little more than one man's detailed conceit against a system that wronged him. Then again, it is a bad system. Oddly enough, what of some who agree with him--i.e. 'case in point?' Evidently we all could use a lesson in what we laugh at--the 'tidal' correction, if you can call it that, makes no sense, our fellow reviewer was spelling 'title.'