A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (2 Cassettes)

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (2 Cassettes)

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by James Joyce
     
 

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As Joyce describes the sometimes terrifying Dublin upbringing of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, he immerses the reader in his emerging consciousness, employing language that evolves from baby talk to hellfire sermon to a triumphant artist's manifesto. See more details below

Overview

As Joyce describes the sometimes terrifying Dublin upbringing of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, he immerses the reader in his emerging consciousness, employing language that evolves from baby talk to hellfire sermon to a triumphant artist's manifesto.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780001046672
Publisher:
HarperCollins UK
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Edition description:
Abridged, 2 Cassettes
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 5.50(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

The spell of arms and voices: the white arms of roads, their promise of close embraces and the black arms of tall ships that stand against the moon, their tale of distant nations. They are held out to say: We are alone-come. And the voices say with them: We are your kinsmen. And the air is thick with their company as they call to me, their kinsman, making ready to go, shaking the wings of their exultant and terrible youth.

What People are saying about this

Frank O'Connor
The first page, which looks like a long passage of baby talk, is an elaborate construct that relates the development of the senses to the development of the arts.
Alfred Kazin
Joyce dissolved mechanism in literature as effectively as Einstein destroyed it in physics. He showed that the material of fiction could rest upon as tense a distribution and as delicate a balance of its parts as any poem. Joyce's passion for form, in fact, is the secret of his progress as a novelist. He sought to bring the largest possible quantity of human life under the discipline of the observing mind, and the mark of his success is that he gave an epic form to what remains invisible to most novelists...Joyce means many things to different people; for me his importance has always been primarily a moral one. He was perhaps, the last man in Europe who wrote as if art were worth a human life... By living for his art he may yet have given others a belief in art worth living for.

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