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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Illustrated)
     

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Illustrated)

3.9 58
by James Joyce
 

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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is the first novel of Irish writer James Joyce. A Künstlerroman in a modernist style, it traces the intellectual and religio-philosophical awakening of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictional alter ego of Joyce and an allusion to Daedalus, the consummate craftsman of Greek mythology. Stephen questions and rebels against the

Overview

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is the first novel of Irish writer James Joyce. A Künstlerroman in a modernist style, it traces the intellectual and religio-philosophical awakening of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictional alter ego of Joyce and an allusion to Daedalus, the consummate craftsman of Greek mythology. Stephen questions and rebels against the Catholic and Irish conventions under which he has grown, and culminates with his self-exile from Ireland in Europe. The work uses techniques that Joyce developed more fully in Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake (1939).


A Portrait began life in 1903 as Stephen Hero—a projected 63-chapter autobiographical novel in a realistic style. After 25 chapters, Joyce abandoned Stephen Hero in 1907 and set to reworking its themes and protagonist into a condensed five-chapter novel, dispensing with strict realism and making extensive use of free indirect speech that allowed the reader to peer into Stephen's developing consciousness. American modernist poet Ezra Pound had the novel serialized in the English literary magazine The Egoist in 1914 and 1915, and published as a book in 1916 by B. W. Huebsch of New York. The publication of A Portrait and the short story collection Dubliners (1914) earned Joyce a place at the forefront of literary modernism.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781632951892
Publisher:
Flying Fish
Publication date:
07/06/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

One of the 20th century's greatest writers, James Joyce was born in Dublin in 1882, and his native city is at the heart of his best-known books: Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and the short story collection Dubliners. His flowing, sometimes musical, often challenging prose has provoked and inspired generations of readers. He died in 1941.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
February 2, 1882
Date of Death:
January 13, 1941
Place of Birth:
Dublin, Ireland
Place of Death:
Zurich, Switzerland
Education:
B.A., University College, Dublin, 1902
Website:
http://www.jamesjoyce.ie

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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Illustrated + FREE audiobook link + Active TOC) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 58 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This James Joyce's most personal novel written about one man's impressionable childhood and follows him through to his college years as he comes to a greater understanding of individualism and intellectulal freedom and throws off the limitations of his catholic upbringing. The novel is a masterpiece of writing style that defies time and place and becomes a book of everlasting, and everpresent importance. The book is written in a stream of conscience style (somewhat similar to Dostoevsky but more so) that can at times be difficult to follow. This is certainly not your typical beach reading, or grocery line novel. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a terribly moving novel, but it must be read with great patience, and presence of mind. You have to be willing to work for it to feel the true and indescribable force of this novel. The novel is required reading for any serious reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
James Joyce is one of the world's greatest authors of all time. He wrote poetry and prose and, in his final book, Finnegans Wake, created his own language. This book is a great tale of Stephen Deadalus through his early life that, in analysis, provides a 'portrait' of the young James Joyce. Probably Joyce's best book for the beginner Joyce-fan, this Penguin Putnam Classic is fully annotated by an ingenious scholar to help the reader who does not understand all of Joyce's plays on words and tricks. This is essential for everyone's personal library!
songcatchers More than 1 year ago
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is ranked by the Modern Library as the third greatest English-language novel of the twentieth century. I have no idea why. I just found it to be extremely boring. The book is the semi-autobiographical coming of age of Stephen Dedalus, the alter ego of James Joyce. From his questions and anxiety over the roles of women and his dealings with them to his on-again-off-again struggles with religion, A Portrait of the Artist...just didn't keep my interest. It's not a bad story really but I just did not dig the prose. I haven't given up on James Joyce yet but I really hope his other books won't put me to sleep.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This has less typos than the other edition on b&n, but theres still some issues. If you haven't read much joyce, i suggest picking up a (dare i say it) physical copy...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was an old favorite and recently purchased as a graduation gift.
ConfuzzledShannon More than 1 year ago
We are introduced to the character Stephen as a young boy as he grows to manhood.  Stephen is sometimes strange, smart, brave and shy.   Emphasis on the strange most of the time. This is a book I almost wish I had read it for a class so there would be a discussion and I would understand it better.    I am not sure how Joyce considers this young man an artist because he is inches away from becoming a priest.  Unless this is suppose to be Joyce’s story.  The first chapter is gibberish to me and I almost didn’t go past it. But  I did and it got better. Although as soon as it got better and I understood what Stephen was talking about he would on OCD rant about pretty much on anything like hell, authors, philosophy … I know a lot of people dislike this book and sadly I am one of them. 
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James Joyce artfully crafts his novel to examine a struggle that everyone must go through at some point or another: finding yourself and your own path. Joyce is brilliant and it is my opinion that everyone should read this book.
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