A Private Disgrace: Lizzie Borden by Daylight

A Private Disgrace: Lizzie Borden by Daylight

4.3 6
by Victoria Lincoln
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Lizzie Andrew Borden was tried and acquitted in the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. Media coverage of the case created a furor throughout the United States reminiscent of the Rosenberg, Claus von Bulow and O.J. Simpson trials. No other suspect was ever charged with the double homicide, and speculation on the case continues

Overview

Lizzie Andrew Borden was tried and acquitted in the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. Media coverage of the case created a furor throughout the United States reminiscent of the Rosenberg, Claus von Bulow and O.J. Simpson trials. No other suspect was ever charged with the double homicide, and speculation on the case continues to this day.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940045104685
Publisher:
Victoria Lincoln
Publication date:
11/21/2012
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
170,500
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

VICTORIA LINCOLN was born in 1904 in Fall River, Massachusetts, where she lived until she graduated from the B.M.C. Durfee public high school in 1922.She majored in English at Radcliffe College, married the scion of a well-to-do Southern family, divorced, and later married Victor Lowe, a professor of philosophy whose primary interest was in the work of Alfred North Whitehead. They settled in Baltimore, Maryland. She had one child from her first marriage and two from her second.Miss Lincoln wrote many essays and short stories for women’s magazines and several novels including February Hill (an early success in 1934) and Charles (1962) about Charles Dickens.After many years of wanting to write about Lizzie Borden, and despite advice that the market for books on Lizzie was saturated, she decided that her unique perspective on the murders deserved a hearing. A PRIVATE DISGRACE received an Edgar as the best non-fiction crime book of 1967 from the Mystery Writers of America.In 1981 Miss Lincoln died in her home in Baltimore. She was 76.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

A Private Disgrace: Lizzie Borden by Daylight 4.3 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first read A Private Disgrace in law school while preparing for a mock trial. Victoria Lincoln has walked that fine line between accurately telling the facts she uncovered via meticulous research and telling a tale that is interesting (unlike the other horrid books we were assigned). She tells her tale like a Homerian bard might sing a song to a king; history and fact intertwined with just enough human interest to make it feel more like you have the inside scoop on some juicy gossip rather than the meticulously researched historical tome this book really is (and we were forced to read the actual court transcripts to prepare for our mock trial … this book -is- pretty accurate). Although Lincoln falls firmly into the school of 'Lizzie did it,' the picture she paints of Lizzie is a sympathetic one. The science Lincoln relied upon in 1967 to hypothesize Lizzie suffered from a form of temporal epilepsy is nowadays discredited, but nonetheless the meticulously researched details Lincoln documented enable somebody with a mental health background (such as myself) to peg Lizzie as a likely sociopath (think Sleeping With the Enemy). I was pleased to see this book is now available once more in paperback and e-book and recently re-read it. It was as much a pleasure to read the second time as the first.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this years ago having found it in a box of books in our basement.....It was awesome! I have recommended it to family and friends!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very interesting telling of a story we all thought we knew.
Bookworm1951 4 months ago
I have read much better accounts of the Lizzie Borden case. The author's writing style was so flowery. She took one concept and went round and round until it was difficult to know what she was actually talking about. Way too long and not to the point. The nearly 730 pages could have been cut in half and still gotten the point across if the author would have only stated her findings and moved on. She was biased regarding Lizzie's guilt. I was very disappointed that she spent little time on the actual trial. Whether you think Lizzie did it - or not - read books based on the facts of the case for more accurate information.
GramyPat More than 1 year ago
I have really enjoyed reading this book. Just watched the newer movie on have learned the true faces from the book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago