BN.com Gift Guide

A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self

Overview

This is the provocative question posed by Frank Browning in a A Queer Geography. In this contemporary classic of gay literature, now with a revised first chapter, Browning shows us that gay culture is more a fabrication of American identity politics than of actual sexual desire. He explores the gay psyche as he travels from the streets of Brooklyn to the hill of Kentucky, from France to the Bay of Naples. As he does so, he argues that roots of gay identity by showing how the Puritan compact led to the backroom ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (30) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(1)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1899-12-30 New 0517598574 Hardcover edition.

Ships from: NEW ORLEANS, LA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$31.07
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(303)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(188)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
Sending request ...

Overview

This is the provocative question posed by Frank Browning in a A Queer Geography. In this contemporary classic of gay literature, now with a revised first chapter, Browning shows us that gay culture is more a fabrication of American identity politics than of actual sexual desire. He explores the gay psyche as he travels from the streets of Brooklyn to the hill of Kentucky, from France to the Bay of Naples. As he does so, he argues that roots of gay identity by showing how the Puritan compact led to the backroom bawdy house, how being "born again" is reenacted as "coming out," and how gay men's search for their own identity profoundly echoes American's relentless quest for a national identity of its own. In the end, he demonstrates that while homosexuality may be universal, "gay identity" is a twentieth-century creation already being challenged.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Roberto Friedman
Browning investigates the idea of a gay identity as just one point on a global spectrum of homosexual lives and behaviors. -- Washington Post Book World
Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
In an often provocative personal exploration of homosexual identity, National Public Radio reporter Browning (The Culture of Desire) argues that gay activism in the U.S. has taken on a communitarian, almost religious character, shaped by a Protestant belief in spiritual rebirth that is central to American culture. In transforming subterranean desire into a political movement, gay and lesbian activists have made coming out a ritual akin to being 'born-again,' he contends. By contrast, the gay-straight divide is much more fluid and bridgeable in Naples, Italy, where Browning's encounters with a gay doctor and transvestites lead him to situate homosexual identity in a web of family relations and social codes. To buttress his thesis that experiencing being gay is shaped by one's culture, Browning looks at the ritualized gay sex of Sambia tribesmen of New Guinea and at homosexuality among middle-class Brazilians and Filipinos. The search for a responsible, liberated sexuality, he insists, can serve as a model for political activists working to achieve an inclusive, pluralistic, democratic society.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In an often provocative personal exploration of homosexual identity, National Public Radio reporter Browning (The Culture of Desire) argues that gay activism in the U.S. has taken on a communitarian, almost religious character, shaped by a Protestant belief in spiritual rebirth that is central to American culture. In transforming subterranean desire into a political movement, gay and lesbian activists have made coming out a ritual akin to being "born-again," he contends. By contrast, the gay-straight divide is much more fluid and bridgeable in Naples, Italy, where Browning's encounters with a gay doctor and transvestites lead him to situate homosexual identity in a web of family relations and social codes. To buttress his thesis that experiencing being gay is shaped by one's culture, Browning looks at the ritualized gay sex of Sambia tribesmen of New Guinea and at homosexuality among middle-class Brazilians and Filipinos. The search for a responsible, liberated sexuality, he insists, can serve as a model for political activists working to achieve an inclusive, pluralistic, democratic society. Author tour. (Apr.)
Charles Harmon
Browning's "Culture of Desire" (1993) regarded modern gay American culture as having evolved out of sexual desire. His new book goes beyond sexual desire to answer the question, Does a specifically gay identity exist? He begins with the premise that general society's depiction of gays is based on the mores and archetypes of the predominantly young inhabitants of urban gay neighborhoods. He leads us beyond this rather narrow sampling of all gays to see whether Stonewall veterans (the now middle-aged generation of 1970s gay activists) have anything in common with today's teen and twenty-something queers and, if so, whether that common something is shared by gays in Nepal, New Guinea, and Kentucky, or in different ethnic groups. Browning importantly contributes to gay studies by moving beyond sexual politics to look at other forces--economic, aesthetic, historical, etc.--that drive gay "outness" (his term). Not as tightly focused as "Culture", "Queer Geography" in many ways mirrors what some may consider the present state of gay culture in the more developed parts of the globe.
Robert E. Bauman
Don't misunderstand the meaning of geography here. There are no maps. What the author seeks is a delineation of the constituent elements of being gay, as the subtitle says: Journey Towards a Sexual Self.

In his first book, Browning writes here, he asked "a single question: Had gay men succeeded in the radical, utopian dream of constructing their own social world based on the exigencies of desires?" Now, he argues, we"re moving beyond the desire to define ourselves at all. His new question, says Browning, is "Do gay people [as we once defined gay] exist?" That a "gay community" has evolved, no one denies. Exactly what that community's components may be is wide open to question.
The Advocate

Kirkus Reviews
A murky collection of essays about varying strategies for gay male self-definition.

National Public Radio reporter Browning (The Culture of Desire, 1993, etc.) theorizes that in America the "search for place is at the heart of the gay faith of coming out and being reborn into our own queer culture." While his discussion of how this process mirrors the Puritans' original impulse in settling America is occasionally provocative, he confuses the point by noting that many gay men flout the idea of, and the need for, a queer culture. In anecdotes drawn from his own life and many contacts, professional and romantic, Browning finds that the perspectives of men who desire men are so divergent that, especially across generations, they often don't share anything like the same "interior geography." Browning discusses an obscure New Guinea tribe whose boys perform fellatio on their elders for a time, then become heterosexual; he holds up this provisional brand of sexuality, which is ritually bound up with communal identity, as a contrast to Americans' insistence on sexuality as a matter of individual identity. A chapter on transvestite prostitutes in Naples reinforces the unoriginal point that other cultures take for granted ambiguities most Americans have trouble confronting. Browning questions whether the process of coming out doesn't so much liberate the individual as commit him to an unnecessarily formulaic category, and explains that Michel Foucault didn't publicly avow his homosexuality for this reason; the argument is clever but barren. And like many of Foucault's less brilliant disciples, Browning constantly lards his prose with specious analytical language; for instance, explaining his "open relationship" and how gay men acquire extended networks of friends through sex, he says such a social system "values a dynamic ethics of human interaction over an inherited rule of domestic exclusivity."

Yes, plus, you get all that sex.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780517598573
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/2/1996
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.22 (w) x 9.11 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)