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A Scientist's Guide To Talking With The Media: Practical Advice from the Union of Concerned Scientists

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Overview

"This book is essential medicine for the pandemic of scientific illiteracy. The architects of the explosive growth of science-based technology must communicate as never before and there is now a lucid guide." --Leon Lederman, 1988 Nobel Prize in Physics

"This is an invaluable guide for scientists seeking to learn how to better communicate with--and through--the media. The book gives the kind of insight into new operations that will allow researchers to better understand the process of and to feel more comfortable talking with reporters. And the timing is just right--now more than ever we need an improved public understanding of science and the way it affects our lives." --Deborah Blum, 1992 Pulitzer-Prize winner for beat reporting on primate research.

In this book, Richard Hayes and Daniel Grossman draw on their expertise in public relations and journalism to empower researchers in a variety of fields to spread their message on their own terms. The authors provide tips on how to translate abstract concepts into concrete metaphors, craft soundbites, and prepare for interviews. For those looking for a higher profile, the authors explain how to become a reporter's trusted source--the first card in the Rolodex--on controversial issues.
A must-read for all scientists, this book shows how it IS possible for the discoveries that hibernate in lecture halls and academic journals to reach a broader audience in a way that is accurate and effective.
Richard Hayes is media director of the Union of Concerned Scientists, an independent nonprofit alliance of more than 10,000 scientists and citizens. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.
Daniel Grossman is a science journalist, radio and web producer, and educator who has covered the science beat for more than eighteen years. He lives in Watertown, Massachusetts.

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Editorial Reviews

1992 Pulitzer-Prize winner for beat reporting on primate research - Deborah Blum
This is an invaluable guide for scientists seeking to learn how to better communicate with-and through-the media. The book gives the kind of insight into news operations that will allow researchers to better understand the process and to feel more comfortable talking with reporters. And the timing is just right-now more than ever we need an improved public understanding of science and the way it affects our lives.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813538570
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2006
  • Pages: 222
  • Product dimensions: 6.06 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 0.77 (d)

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