A Second is a Hiccup: A Child's Book of Time

A Second is a Hiccup: A Child's Book of Time

by Hazel Hutchins, Kady MacDonald Denton
     
 

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"How long is a second?"

"A second is a hiccup--the time it takes to kiss your mom, or jump a rope, or turn around."

The newest book by acclaimed picture-book creators Hazel Hutchins and Kady McDonald Denton explains units of time in imaginative terms children can understand: A second lasts as long as a hiccup; a week is seven sleeps; and a year is the time it

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Overview

"How long is a second?"

"A second is a hiccup--the time it takes to kiss your mom, or jump a rope, or turn around."

The newest book by acclaimed picture-book creators Hazel Hutchins and Kady McDonald Denton explains units of time in imaginative terms children can understand: A second lasts as long as a hiccup; a week is seven sleeps; and a year is the time it takes to grown into new shoes!

Any parent who's been asked, "How long is a minute?" or any kid who's wondered, "What does 'an hour' mean?" will enjoy this smart, simple, and surprising book.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Booklist Sarred
Hutchins explains the lengths of various time units in original, child-centered terms. A Second is how long it takes to hiccup or “to kiss your mom/ Or jump a rope/ Or turn around.” A minute is not just 60 seconds, it's also time enough for 60 hiccups, 60 hops, or a little song including the chorus and verses. And so on, through an hour, a day, a week, a month, and a year. Ingenious explanations include a month as the time it takes for a scraped shin to grow new skin and a year how long it takes to outgrow a pair of shoes. Often falling in to rhymed couplets, the fluid text reads aloud well. Few contemporary illustrators depict children with such understanding, grace, and quirky charm as Denton, whose previous picture books include Claire Masurel's Two Homes (2001) and Nan Gregory's Amber Waiting (2002). Here the diverse cast of characters centers on three children who intersect with each other, their parents, and their siblings as they participate in a year's worth of activities. Washed with gentle colors, the sensitive drawings portray children who are secure, actively engaged, and sometimes even joyful within their community of family and friends. The first American edition of a Canadian picture book, this is a worthy companion to Zolotow's equally child-centered classic Over and Over (1957) and fresh new take on the passage of time.
Children's Literature - Sylvia Firth
As the title suggests, this is a book that engagingly answers young children's questions about time. Cleverly using concepts that youngsters understand, the author explains the meaning of divisions in time. A minute is "sixty hiccups." Building a tower, running through a shower, climbing a tree, smelling a flower, and using secret power will cover an hour. A week encompasses, among other things, seven nights of sleep and seven wakings in the morning. Similar descriptions are presented for a day, a month and a year. The lively watercolor and ink illustrations are perfect accompaniments for the rhyming text. This book will work well with Charlotte Zolotow's Over and Over in teaching the definition of time. Here is another valuable addition for all collections with its wonderful combination of words and pictures.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2
The abstract concept of time is explained in child-friendly terms: "A second is a hiccup�/The time it takes to kiss your mom/Or jump a rope/Or turn around." A minute is long enough to "sing just one small song," and in an hour, you could build a sandcastle, run through a sprinkler, climb a tree, and play pretend. A day "needs filling, like a cup," and a week is explained as "Seven wake-ups, seven sleeps." In a month, a scraped shin will heal with "brand-new skin," and by the end of a year, "You'll grow right out of your old shoes." Denton's charming watercolor-and-ink vignettes, showing three friends interacting with one another and with their families, celebrate their joys and accomplishments with warmth and affection. The lyrical, rhyming text answers deceptively simple childhood questions with great flair.
—Linda LudkeCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
How long is a second? How about a minute? An hour? A day? Hutchins has all the right answers to these time-related questions and more, and she explains them flawlessly, in terms just right for young children. A second, for example, "is a hiccup-The time it takes to kiss your mom / Or jump a rope / Or turn around." An hour is "Sixty minutes singing by. / If you build a sandy tower / Run right through a sprinkly shower / Climb a tree and smell a flower / Pretend you have a secret power / That should nicely fill / An hour." With a sense of wonder and gentle whimsy reminiscent of Ruth Krauss, each line of text rhymes and dances along with three playful children and their families as they explore and travel through a year's worth of sunrises, seasons, growing, counting, learning and fun. Imminently appealing watercolor illustrations, replete with warmth, complement the text perfectly. An excellent read-aloud and a great choice for any child learning about time. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439831062
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2007
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
562,821
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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