Fiction Narrative and Knowledge: Essays on Fiction, Narrative, and Knowledge [NOOK Book]

Overview

A team of leading contributors from both philosophical and literary backgrounds have been brought together in this impressive book to examine how works of literary fiction can be a source of knowledge. Together, they analyze the important trends in this current popular debate.



The innovative feature of this volume is that it mixes work by literary theorists and scholars with work of analytic ...

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Fiction Narrative and Knowledge: Essays on Fiction, Narrative, and Knowledge

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Overview

A team of leading contributors from both philosophical and literary backgrounds have been brought together in this impressive book to examine how works of literary fiction can be a source of knowledge. Together, they analyze the important trends in this current popular debate.



The innovative feature of this volume is that it mixes work by literary theorists and scholars with work of analytic philosophers that combined together provide a comprehensive statement of the variety of ways in which works of fiction can engage questions of worldly interest. It uses the problem of cognitive value to explore:



  • literature’s contribution to ethical life

  • literature’s ability to engage in social and political critique

  • the role narrative plays in opening up possibilities of moral, aesthetic, experience and selfhood

This remarkable volume will attract the attention of both literature and philosophy scholars with its statement of the various ways that literature and life take an interest in one another.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...this volume makes an important contribution by focusing on several areas in which literary fiction and narrative remain of vital contemporary philosophical interest." — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
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Product Details

Meet the Author

John Gibson is Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Temple University, USA. He is co-editor (with Wolfgang Huemer) of The Literary Wittgenstein (Routledge, 2004).

Wolfgang Huemer is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Erfurt, Germany. He is author of The Constitution of Consciousness. A Study on Analytic Phenomenology (Routledge, 2004).

Luca Pocci received his PhD in Comparative Literature and currently teaches in Siena. The scope of his research interests range from literary theory (with a particular focus on thematic criticism) to interdisciplinary fields, such as the interplay between the discourses of fiction and historiography.

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Table of Contents


Notes on Contributors     x
Acknowledgments     xiv
Introduction: the prospects of literary cognitivism   John Gibson     1
Knowledge through literary fiction     11
Learning from literature   Peter Lamarque     13
Literary realism, recognition, and the communication of knowledge   Noel Carroll     24
The laboratory of the mind   Catherine Z. Elgin     43
"How Could You?": deeper understanding through fiction   Susan L. Feagin     55
Aharon Appelfeld and the problem of Holocaust fiction   Bernard Harrison     67
The return of the repressed: caring about literature and its themes   Luca Pocci     89
Lewis Carroll: fugitive from reality?   A. D. Nuttall     104
Narrating worlds and selves     119
Philosophy as/and/of literature   Arthur C. Danto     121
The ends of narrative   Richard Eldridge     138
Narrative catharsis   Garry L. Hagberg     151
Postmodern narratives of the past: Simon Schama   Lubomir Dolezel     167
En Abyme: internal models and cognitive mapping   Brian McHale     189
Traveling stories: knowledge, activism,and the humanities   Linda Hutcheon     206
The poetic, the dramatic, and the real     217
Poetry and cognition   Eileen John     219
Why read literature? The cognitive function of form   Wolfgang Huemer     233
"The way light at the edge of a beach in autumn is learned": literature as learning   Frank B. Farrell     246
Wonder in The Winter's Tale: a cautionary account of epistemic criticism   Charles Altieri     266
Imagination, objectivity, and culture     287
Legends and myths   Kendall L. Walton     289
Literature and make-believe   Joseph Margolis     293
Art and the view from nowhere   Alex Burri     308
Culture: a recursive process   Wolfgang Iser     318
Index     332
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