A Sketch Of The Modern Languages Of The East Indies

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER V. TIBETO-BURMAN FAMILY. I Approach the Tibeto-Burman Family with some misgivings, for the Field is imperfectly explored, it is unusually extensive, and the classification is new, and I have no authority to follow, as in ...
See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER V. TIBETO-BURMAN FAMILY. I Approach the Tibeto-Burman Family with some misgivings, for the Field is imperfectly explored, it is unusually extensive, and the classification is new, and I have no authority to follow, as in the three preceding Families. Little has been done in the way of classifying and arranging since the date of Max Mailer's letter to Bunsen on the Turanian Languages a quarter of a century ago, yet in some parts of the Field our geographical, ethnical, and linguistic knowledge has so extended, that a reprint of that letter would do more harm than good. It is my present task to indicate, what has been done, and what remains to be done, and I see signs that something more will soon be done. The interior grouping of the members of this enormous Family must for the present be based upon geographical considerations, and upon no other. It extends from the Eiver Indus and the frontier of Dardistan, already described in the Aryan Family, in a South-Easterly direction to the Eiver Mekong and the Isthmus of Kraw, in Siam. It embraces the whole length of the Himalaya range and the kingdom of Tibet, and portion of Yunan in China beyond. It is admitted, that there is a linguistic affinity connecting seven groups out of the eight, which make up this Family. The old phrase of Hodgson, " Tamulic," must be abandoned, as based on an error admitted by that scholar; the term Turanian is decidedly objectionable, as implying too much; the proposed subdivision of Max Muller into Gangetic, and Lohi- tic, would at best only apply to part of the Field, and is inappropriate. We must fall back upon a compound name, formed from the two leading Languages of the Northern and Southern branches of the Family. It is a positive fact, that Tibetan and Burmese are the only two great lit...
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780857920911
  • Publisher: Yokai Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/9/2010
  • Pages: 206
  • Product dimensions: 0.47 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 5.50 (d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER V. TIBETO-BURMAN FAMILY. I Approach the Tibeto-Burman Family with some misgivings, for the Field is imperfectly explored, it is unusually extensive, and the classification is new, and I have no authority to follow, as in the three preceding Families. Little has been done in the way of classifying and arranging since the date of Max Mailer's letter to Bunsen on the Turanian Languages a quarter of a century ago, yet in some parts of the Field our geographical, ethnical, and linguistic knowledge has so extended, that a reprint of that letter would do more harm than good. It is my present task to indicate, what has been done, and what remains to be done, and I see signs that something more will soon be done. The interior grouping of the members of this enormous Family must for the present be based upon geographical considerations, and upon no other. It extends from the Eiver Indus and the frontier of Dardistan, already described in the Aryan Family, in a South-Easterly direction to the Eiver Mekong and the Isthmus of Kraw, in Siam. It embraces the whole length of the Himalaya range and the kingdom of Tibet, and portion of Yunan in China beyond. It is admitted, that there is a linguistic affinity connecting seven groups out of the eight, which make up this Family. The old phrase of Hodgson, " Tamulic," must be abandoned, as based on an error admitted by that scholar; the term Turanian is decidedly objectionable, as implying too much; the proposed subdivision of Max Muller into Gangetic, and Lohi- tic, would at best only apply to part of the Field, and is inappropriate. We must fall back upon a compound name, formed from the two leading Languages of the Northern and Southernbranches of the Family. It is a positive fact, that Tibetan and Burmese are the only two great lit...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)