A Slave Story: From Africa to Charleston

A Slave Story: From Africa to Charleston

by Darren Campbell, Diana Whitman
     
 

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The story of Charleston is a history of old America. Her harbors were the most prosperous. Her residents were wealthy. Her slaves were bountiful. Three out of four Africans brought to America came through her ports. By 1709 Blacks were the majority in Charleston. African culture, food and dialect are still alive through the Gullah people today.

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Overview

The story of Charleston is a history of old America. Her harbors were the most prosperous. Her residents were wealthy. Her slaves were bountiful. Three out of four Africans brought to America came through her ports. By 1709 Blacks were the majority in Charleston. African culture, food and dialect are still alive through the Gullah people today.

Discover Charleston through the eyes of a slave named Amadu. A Slave Story opens with a ten-year-old girl named Simone learning history from her teacher Mrs. Singleton. Simone is eager to teach others what she learns. She narrates about the history of enslavement and introduces Amadu, an African warrior captured by slave hunters and forced into a life of enslavement. His story begins in the early 1700�s on an old slave ship heading to the New World. Through narration, Amadu describes his home, work, other slaves and plantation life.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Jounal - Emily Herman
"A Slave Story enlarges the historical perspectives of American youth and enriches their understanding of slavery."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016701950
Publisher:
The Simone Club
Publication date:
05/17/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
40
File size:
9 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

For the past fifteen years, Darren Campbell has been a researcher of history. He is an orator, speechwriter and the author of five books. Darren is the creator of the �Simone Project,� a classroom series narrated through the eyes of a 10-year-old African American girl named Simone, who takes the participants on numerous journeys through landmarks of history. Between 2005 and 2012, Darren has received several awards and national recognition for his work on the Simone Project. For example, he is a recipient of the Expansion Arts Award from the Community Foundation of Charleston. Darren has received three individual art grants from the City of Charleston Cultural Arts Commission and featured on local TV, radio, as well as national magazines including Essence, Jet, and the School Library Journal. Darren has written numerous columns for the Charleston Chronicle, a local newspaper with tides to hundreds of churches in the Black community. He also is a frequent guess on the Pastor Washington Show, a radio program that airs every Friday afternoon that talk about Black history and the Bible. Darren is also the director of First Agenda, a non-profit 501(C3) program with headquarters in Charleston, SC that targets urban schools. First Agenda combines music with positive lyrics, speeches and poetry to enlighten, excite, and educate young audiences about their past. Invited by the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, Darren gave lectures to elementary students from five local schools. He received outstanding reviews at each event from the students and their teachers, and requested to continue these lectures. Darren is very excited about the Simone Project because of the potential it has to reach students across America.

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