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A Sled Dog for Moshi
     

A Sled Dog for Moshi

by Jeanne Bushey, Germaine Arnatauyok (Illustrator)
 

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The young Inuit child Moshi longs for a pet dog like the one owned by her friend Jessica. Moshi's father explains that the puppies that Nuna, their missing sled dog, is expecting are work dogs not playthings. While out walking, Moshi and Jessica are surprised by a sudden whiteout. Nuna finds the children and leads them to shelter in a small shed, where the dog is

Overview

The young Inuit child Moshi longs for a pet dog like the one owned by her friend Jessica. Moshi's father explains that the puppies that Nuna, their missing sled dog, is expecting are work dogs not playthings. While out walking, Moshi and Jessica are surprised by a sudden whiteout. Nuna finds the children and leads them to shelter in a small shed, where the dog is keeping her puppies. While the girls huddle with the pups, Nuna runs off, soon returning with rescuers. Praised by her father for thinking "like an Inuk" to survive the snow, Moshi happily chooses a pup--deciding she would rather have a sled dog than a pet.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
In a remote Alaskan village, Moshi, a native girl, and Jessica, a young newcomer from New York, become friends. The girls have fun playing with Jessica's pet dog, but they come to appreciate the value of work dogs when they are stranded by a sudden spring blizzard. It's a chilling environment, but there's a lot of warmth in this story about friendship, family and devotion. Much of the warmth comes from the pastel pencil drawings by native Inuit artist Arnaktauyok. An added bonus is a glossary that defines and pictures those words that may be foreign to non-Alaskan natives.
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
Tension is thick as arctic snow in this riveting picture book. Two young girls are caught out on the tundra in a whiteout - a blizzard so blinding, so dense that all sense of direction is lost. Jessica is a transplant from New York City, but Moshi is a native of Iquluit and remembers all the survival techniques that her father has taught her. Her sharp skills and a lead sled dog save the girls from the deathtrap of the cold. The Inuit artist has created foggy watercolors that chill the pages and add frosting to a sweet piece of fiction.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2Moshi, a Canadian Eskimo, and a new friend from New York City are lost in a whiteout and saved by the native girl's survival skills and her father's lead sled dog. Although this story includes Moshi's realistic desire to have a dog of her own and highlights the value of remembering lessons learned from parents, the dialogue between the two friends seems stiff, simplistic, and unrealistic. The colored-pencil illustrations succeed in depicting the chill and lack of visibility during the blizzard, the concern Moshi has for her friend, and her love and respect for her father. However, they are static; at times the girls look like stuffed dolls. While this book supports primary themes such as friendship, survival, dogs, and Eskimo culture, it is not a priority purchase.Roz Goodman, Bering Strait School District Media Center, Unalakleet, AK

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550419566
Publisher:
Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Limited
Publication date:
10/18/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
3 Months to 5 Years

Meet the Author

Born in the United States, Jeanne Bushey, along with her husband and two daughters, set out for Iqualuit in 1973 and later moved to Yellowknife. She has been a kindergarden teacher and also has an interest in drama. Jeanne has written several children's, including; The Polar Bear's Gift, Orphans in the Sky and Holiday Hang-Ups (an activity guide). Although she has now moved to coastal British Columbia, she hopes to keep the events of her life in the Arctic alive in her writing for years to come.

Germaine Arnaktauyok is renowned for her talents as an illustrator and master printmaker. The daughter of carvers Therese Nattok and Isidore Iytok, she started to draw on any material available while still a young girl in Igloolik. When she was sent to residential school at Chesterfield Inlet at age nine, she met a nun who gave her art lessons. Germaine sold her first painting at age 11. Germaine's image of an Inuit drum dancer now appears on the 2000 edition of the Canadian $2 coin.

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