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A Slender Tether
     

A Slender Tether

5.0 1
by Jess Wells
 

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Amidst the turbulent weather of Europe's Little Ice Age, A Slender Tether offers three compelling tales of self-discovery, woven into a rich tapestry of 14th century France. Christine de Pizan, daughter of a disgraced court physician and astrologer, grapples with her ambition to be the first woman writer of France. A doctor finds an unusual way to cope with the death

Overview

Amidst the turbulent weather of Europe's Little Ice Age, A Slender Tether offers three compelling tales of self-discovery, woven into a rich tapestry of 14th century France. Christine de Pizan, daughter of a disgraced court physician and astrologer, grapples with her ambition to be the first woman writer of France. A doctor finds an unusual way to cope with the death of his wife. And opportunity alternates with disasters in the lives of four commoners, yoked by necessity: a paper-maker struggling to keep his business, a falconer with a mysterious past, a merchant's daughter frantic to avoid an arranged marriage, and a down-on-his-luck musician with a broken guitar and the voice of an angel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781611792614
Publisher:
Fireship Press
Publication date:
05/06/2013
Pages:
202
Sales rank:
478,373
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.43(d)

Meet the Author

Jess Wells, recipient of a San Francisco Arts Council Grant for Literature, is the author of four novels and four books of short stories. Her work is included in more than three dozen anthologies and literary journals, has been reprinted in the UK and translated into Italian. Her previous historical fiction includes The Mandrake Broom, set in the European Middle Ages, and she teaches writing via online classes and at schools and conferences nation-wide. She blogs on RedRoom.com, can be found on Facebook and at jess.wells.com

Wells’ novels are:
A Slender Tether (Fireship Press, 2013)
The Mandrake Broom (Firebrand Books, 2007)
The Price of Passion (Firebrand Books, 1999)
AfterShocks (Third Side Press,1992; The Women’s Press-UK, 1993; Triangle Classics, 2002 )

Wells’ short story collections are:
Two Willow Chairs (Library B Books, 1987)
The Dress, The Cry, and a Shirt with No Seams (Library B Books, 1984)
The Sharda Stories (Library B Books, 1982)
Run (Library B Books, 1981)

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A Slender Tether 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Tinney More than 1 year ago
This extraordinary trio of stories by Jess Wells is well titled, because each tale speaks of the slender tether that ties each of us to our sense of what is normal in our lives – our wellbeing, our livelihood, our happiness and safety. Everything can change in a moment, and, inevitably, it does. The three stories are subtly linked, again by a slender tether, though each stands alone. The first tale introduces a Christine de Pizan who is very different than I expected, powerful yet flawed. She is a person I can believe in: medieval woman, intellectual, gifted writer, mainstay of her family, independent spirit. Monique, the woman in the third story, is also convincing as she discovers her strength, develops a skill she can take pride in, and stubbornly makes her own way in the world. Both Christine and Monique make mistakes, but they (and several of the more sympathetic male characters as well) persevere. They think, act, and sometimes make a mess of things, like real human beings in all times and places. These stories seem to me to celebrate human ingenuity, resourcefulness, and resilience. One theme Wells explores in considerable depth is the very personal nature of one's relationship to his or her work. Pride of craftsmanship, intellectual curiosity, ambition, renunciation of one's talents, and finding joy in work all play their parts. The writing is sure, the voice arresting and original. Places come alive; the seasons are painted skillfully, there for the reader to experience. In the third story, Wells takes a common historical fiction cliché and deftly turns it on its head, to the delight of this reader, at least. Highly recommended to readers interested in the lives of medieval people who were neither royalty nor members of the nobility, and who are all the more individual and interesting for that.