Song for Lost Blossoms/Candylion/Little Windows

A Song for Lost Blossoms/Candylion/Little Windows

5.0 1
by Harold Budd
     
 

Well then, so much for composer Harold Budd's "retirement." The wonderful Avalon Sutra/As Long as I Can Hold My Breath from 2005 was supposedly his swan song. Indeed, he was quoted in interviews as saying that he'd said everything he wanted to say musically. Given the sound of A Song for Lost Blossoms on Darla,…  See more details below

Overview

Well then, so much for composer Harold Budd's "retirement." The wonderful Avalon Sutra/As Long as I Can Hold My Breath from 2005 was supposedly his swan song. Indeed, he was quoted in interviews as saying that he'd said everything he wanted to say musically. Given the sound of A Song for Lost Blossoms on Darla, that's perhaps very true. This isn't meant to suggest that what's here isn't worthy of a single listen, or isn't full of the studied, halting magical subtlety that has given Budd his longstanding reputation as a composer of music that is truly beautiful and mysterious as well as understated. Hardly. Recorded over two years in collaboration with guitarist and producer Clive Wright (Cock Robin, Peter Gabriel, the Black Eyed Peas) at various studios and at one another's homes, much of what is here is exactly that. However, at seven tracks and nearly 75 minutes, this is Budd at his most excessive, haltingly contemplative, and calculating. What made Avalon Sutra/As Long as I Can Hold My Breath so captivating is that it not only surveyed the long and winding territory of all the stages of Budd's career as a minimal but abstract composer of melodic music, but that it also took some chances with his own forms and pointed in new directions, places worth summing up because they were actually previously unexplored. The music here with Wright -- and a very nice sampled string arrangement by the wonderful Akira Rabelais on "Forever Hold My Breath" (Rabelais did the production and electronic cut-up on "As Long as I Can Hold My Breath") -- is simply long, repetitive, and aimless. It provides atmospheres for dreaming -- especially the 32-minute opening track, "Pensive Aphrodite" -- but not much else. The music here is so wispy, meandering around very small frames, that it seems to go nowhere at all no matter how pleasant it is. This isn't meant to suggest that longtime Budd fans won't be absolutely delighted with the album; it simply means that revisiting and repeating yourself endlessly isn't a very memorable way to retire. Let's hope that either Budd is back and plans on exploring some new territory in the future, or that these recordings are just a left-over, stuttering gasp to be issued without regard for overall quality, and that his last intentional will and testament as a composer was indeed the Avalon Sutra release.

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Product Details

Release Date:
10/07/2008
Label:
Darla Records
UPC:
0708527019825
catalogNumber:
198
Rank:
57231

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A Song for Lost Blossoms 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Arebellanuite More than 1 year ago
Firstly this reviewer thom whatever needs to sit down, he has totally missed the timeless beauty of this work, the opening track goes far beyond notes on any instrument , rather a portal to worlds far beyond the mind of some retarded reviewer who is in love with his own tunnel vision. I own most of Budds work including the handsome Avalon Sutra. Budds earlier work like White Arcades and Plateaux of Mirrors have a Similar haunting beauty, but this record transports me to another level. Harold Budd and Clive Wrights collaboration fuses a magic far beyond the standard fare of the Ambient genre, and Budd proves again why he is the mentor to many who travel this road.