A Splintered Mirror: Chinese Poetry from the Democracy Movement

Overview

A Splintered Mirror gathers together poems by seven of the Chinese Misty Poets who writings proved one of the first signs of the democracy movement in China. Published clandestinely, or pasted upon walls, Misty poetry quietly exploded the rigid structures of official Chinese poetry, presenting a new poetics infused with personal emotions and private imagery. This collection displays the full range of human concerns, often poignant, evocative, and bittersweet expressions of personal longing—Gu Cheng’s stubborn ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $8.47   
  • New (2) from $148.21   
  • Used (5) from $8.47   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$148.21
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(203)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$215.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A Splintered Mirror gathers together poems by seven of the Chinese Misty Poets who writings proved one of the first signs of the democracy movement in China. Published clandestinely, or pasted upon walls, Misty poetry quietly exploded the rigid structures of official Chinese poetry, presenting a new poetics infused with personal emotions and private imagery. This collection displays the full range of human concerns, often poignant, evocative, and bittersweet expressions of personal longing—Gu Cheng’s stubborn dreams, Mang Ke’s weaving of time, nature, and emotion, Duo Duo’s sharp, self-mocking anger, and Bei Dao’s vision of art as a splintered mirror

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“I’m grateful for Donald Finkel’s deft and timely translations. A Splintered Mirror calls back to mind that photograph of the lone man confronting the tank column in Tiananmen Square. He might have been any one of these poets, whose defiance is a free imagination. The lyric voice has always sought to undo history. These poets are also making history.”—J. D. McClatchy
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The poets featured in this well-translated collection are writers of a style known as Misty poetry, so called for the blurriness of the poems' themes, a vagueness intended to subvert the social realist aesthetic enforced by the Chinese state. Many of these poems deal--some sketchily, some more overtly--with the oppression of the Chinese people by their government, pk either by concentrating on an isolated incident or by constructing broad, encompassing metaphors. In Bei Dao's ``Testament,'' the speaker is about to be executed by a firing squad, but the reader is not told why. Duo Duo's ``Untitled'' conveys the fear of authoritarianism's iron hand in a more abstract way: ``In this pitch-dark, desolate city / again the red terror begins / its savage hammering.'' Although these poems effectively capture various moods and feelings of a citizenry denied its freedom, the poets' often lazy rhythms and hazy imagery leave no lasting impression upon the reader. More memorable are those works in which the poets' calm, peaceful voices ponder the loss of love, as in Gu Cheng's lovely ``Parting,'' or the longevity of love, as in Shu Ting's glorious ``The Singing Flower.'' (Feb.)
Library Journal
These seven young poets (born between 1949 and 1956) call themselves the ``misty'' poets, formerly a derisive description of their obtuse style that conflicted with social realism. Bei Dao ( The August Sleepwalker, LJ 5/90) and Mang Ke, the two most famous, have several poems. Duo Duo, Jian He, Gu Cheng, and Yan Lian are also represented. Shu Ting is the only female. The poems are often gloomy, but many express hope. Through apparently personal themes, the poems offer a political message that is simply a call for freedom to write poetry. These ably translated poems stand on their own merits, not on the poets' merits as dissidents.-- Kitty Chen Dean, Nassau Coll., Garden City, N.Y.
J.D. McClatchy
I'm grateful for Donald Finkel's deft and timely translations. A Splintered Mirror calls back to mind that photograph of the lone man confronting the tank column in Tiananmen Square. He might have been any one of these poets, whose defiance is a free imagination. The lyric voice has always sought to undo history. These poets are also making history.
Michael McClure
A Splintered Mirror reflects the new Chinese poetry that extends from the outspoken and Goya-like defiance of Jiang He to the 'misty,' visionary subjectivity of Bei Dao. Rarely does an anthology display so many profound and emotionally rich poems.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780865474482
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 2/1/1991
  • Pages: 128
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Donald Finkel is the author of twelve books of poetry. He was presented the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and is currently Poet in Residence at Washington University in St. Louis.

Carolyn Kizer won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1985. Her translations of Chinese poetry have been an integral and highly praised part of her work since the 1960s.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)