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A Storm in Flanders: The Ypres Salient, 1914-1918 Tragedy and Triumph on the Western Front
     

A Storm in Flanders: The Ypres Salient, 1914-1918 Tragedy and Triumph on the Western Front

4.4 7
by Winston Groom
 

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A Storm in Flanders is novelist and prizewinning historian Winston Groom's gripping history of the four-year battle for Ypres in Belgian Flanders, the pivotal engagement of World War I that would forever change the way the world fought -- and thought about -- war. In 1914, Germany launched an invasion of France through neutral Belgium -- and brought the

Overview


A Storm in Flanders is novelist and prizewinning historian Winston Groom's gripping history of the four-year battle for Ypres in Belgian Flanders, the pivotal engagement of World War I that would forever change the way the world fought -- and thought about -- war. In 1914, Germany launched an invasion of France through neutral Belgium -- and brought the wrath of the world upon itself. Ypres became a place of horror, heroism, and terrifying new tactics and technologies: poison gas, tanks, mines, air strikes, and the unspeakable misery of trench warfare. Drawing on the journals of the men and women who were there, Winston Groom has penned a breathtaking drama of politics, strategy, and the human heart.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802139986
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/10/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
256,032
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.79(d)

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A Storm in Flanders: The Ypres Salient, 1914-1918 Tragedy and Triumph on the Western Front 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Today it seems like we question military action when just a few soldiers are killed here and there. In World War I, hundreds of soldiers were often killed or wounded every day often under insane conditions. Almost all World War I veterans are now dead so good books that well explain the horror of that conflict are even more important today since first hand accounts are no longer available. This book does a good job of telling what it was like in one of the worst theatres of World War I-- the Ypres Salient where more than 1 million soldiers were brutally killed during the war and the horrors of trench warfare, including poison gas and flamethrower attacks and the tank first appeared. If you think World War II or today's wars are bad, you need to read this book. There are only 2 bad things about this book: its title may not entice those who don't already know some basics of World War I history (and most people today do not) and the book does not have much in the way of a bibliography.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Outstanding book - this is the 1st major title I have read from cover about WWI. This book does an excellent job of providing a visualization of the sheer futility of fighting in those conditions. I have a better understanding of the personalities and the bitterness that was left there in 1918 that led to WWII. Highly recommend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Riveting account of WWI's 'Flanders Fields', the battleground of the Ypres salient. At sixty-eight I've always been an avid reader of 20th century history, but never even vaguely grasped the utter horror, waste of life, and madness of this war -- until I read 'A Storm In Flanders'. Thank you, Winston Groom.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not really knowing much about WWI, I felt this book was a homerun.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Groom has written a book here which will give anyone who has not understood before a better grasp of how apalling service in Flanders was for soldiers serving in the BEF. It falls down when Groom pontificates on the causes of the war as he is clearly an advocate of the discredite 'It's all Germany's fault' school of thought. Most inexcusable is his apologist portrait of Douglas Haig, a man in a very difficult position,who nonetheless was responsible for the staggering losses for which the gains did nor could not merit.