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A Struggle Worthy of Note: The Engineering and Technological Education of Black Americans

Overview

Not surprisingly, African Americans have faced considerable obstacles in pursuing careers in engineering in the United States. Wharton has constructed the first history of black efforts to advance in this field from Emancipation to the present. Utilizing contemporary correspondence and documents, Wharton shows the range of responses from educators and politicians on both sides of the controversy and examines in detail institutions and individuals responsible for the racial and ...

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Overview

Not surprisingly, African Americans have faced considerable obstacles in pursuing careers in engineering in the United States. Wharton has constructed the first history of black efforts to advance in this field from Emancipation to the present. Utilizing contemporary correspondence and documents, Wharton shows the range of responses from educators and politicians on both sides of the controversy and examines in detail institutions and individuals responsible for the racial and educational climate surrounding this issue.

The struggle for the opportunity and acceptance of African-American participants in the technological arena is a struggle worthy of note. The struggle and the examination of this topic is important because, despite the significance of the topic, it has been minimally explored. A pioneering effort, the book will be of concern to all students of American race relations, higher education, and the history of engineering education.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

DAVID E. WHARTON is a native of Washington, D.C. and a product of that city's public school system. Most recently, he served as Director of a minority engineering program, Project Interlock, in the Boston area for five years.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Preface
1 Inventors and Tinkers 1
Grantville Woods 5
Lewis Latimer 9
Garrett Morgan 10
Jan Matzeliger 12
H. C. Webb 13
Henry E. Baker, U.S. Patent Office: Recorder of Black Progress 14
2 The Washington/Du Bois Debate 21
3 Educational Opportunity and the Development of Black Institutions 33
Educational Opportunities, 1900-1930 33
The Twenties 42
The Thirties 45
The Forties 50
The Accreditation of Black Institutions 54
Engineering Opportunities at Howard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 57
The Development of Black Schools of Engineering 64
The Fight for Howard University's School of Engineering: L. K. Downing's Crusade 71
Hampton Institute 73
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College 77
4 Three Black Engineers 81
Gordon Grady, Engineer 82
Archie Alexander, Alexander the Great 86
Henry L. Livas 89
5 The Era of the Brown Decision and Sputnik 93
6 The Sixties 97
7 The Seventies 101
8 The Eighties 105
Conclusions and Implications 117
Appendix A. Diamond Scope, Journal of Howard University School of Engineering, Fall 1985 125
Appendix B. An Information Sheet from L. K. Downing of Howard University to George Davis, Hampton Institute, February 28, 1944 128
Appendix C. A Letter from Ovid Eshbach of Northwestern University to George Davis of Hampton Institute, March 10, 1944 130
Appendix D. "Considerations and Recommendations for the Future Curriculum for Trades and Industries at Hampton Institute," by P. V. Jewell 132
Appendix E. A Letter from Ralph Winslow of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to George Davis of Hampton Institute, March 11, 1944 137
Bibliography 143
Index 151
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