A Symposion of Praise: Horace Returns to Lyric in Odes IV [NOOK Book]

Overview

    Ten years after publishing his first collection of lyric poetry, Odes I-III, Horace (65 B.C.-8 B.C.) returned to lyric and published another book of fifteen odes, Odes IV. These later lyrics, which praise Augustus, the imperial family, and other political insiders, have often been treated more as propaganda than art. But in A Symposion of Praise, Timothy Johnson examines the richly textured ambiguities of Odes IV that engage the audience in the communal or "sympotic" formulation of ...
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A Symposion of Praise: Horace Returns to Lyric in Odes IV

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Overview

    Ten years after publishing his first collection of lyric poetry, Odes I-III, Horace (65 B.C.-8 B.C.) returned to lyric and published another book of fifteen odes, Odes IV. These later lyrics, which praise Augustus, the imperial family, and other political insiders, have often been treated more as propaganda than art. But in A Symposion of Praise, Timothy Johnson examines the richly textured ambiguities of Odes IV that engage the audience in the communal or "sympotic" formulation of Horace's praise. Surpassing propaganda, Odes IV reflects the finely nuanced and imaginative poetry of Callimachus rather than the traditions of Aristotelian and Ciceronian rhetoric, which advise that praise should present commonly admitted virtues and vices.  In this way, Johnson demonstrates that Horace's application of competing perspectives establishes him as Pindar's rival.
    Johnson shows the Horatian panegyrist is more than a dependent poet representing only the desires of his patrons. The poet forges the panegyric agenda, setting out the character of the praise (its mode, lyric, and content both positive and negative), and calls together a community to join in the creation and adaptation of Roman identities and civic ideologies. With this insightful reading, A Symposion of Praise will be of interest to historians of the Augustan period and its literature, and to scholars interested in the dynamics between personal expression and political power.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780299207434
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
  • Publication date: 3/7/2005
  • Series: Wisconsin Studies in Classics
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 344
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Timothy Johnson is associate professor of classics at the University of Florida.
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Table of Contents


<table of contents, p. vii/>
Contents
Acknowledgments 000
Abbreviations 000
Introduction 000
Chapter One: Sympotic Horace 000
Looking Back 000
Levis et Gravis 000
Parties and Politics 000
Sympotic Horace's Epic Criticism 000
Sympotic Horace Exiled: Epistle II.2 and Odes IV.1 000
Chapter Two: Encomia Nobilium and Horace's Panegyric Praxis 000
C.1 and 2: Great Expectations? Inventing Panegyric Discord 000
C.3 and 6: The Poet among the Nobiles 000
C.7: Panegyric and Politics, Putting Off Heirs 000
C.8 and 9: As the Wor(l)d Turns, Praise and Blame 000
Chapter Three: Encomia Augusti, "Take One" 000
C.4: EpinikionOne-The Panegyric Agon 000
C.5: A Panegyric TagOne-All in the Family 000
Chapter Four: Songs of Mo(u)rning 000
C.10: Faces in the Mirror, Ligurinus, Horace, and Vergil 000
C.11: The Phyllis Odes and the Comic Power of Shared Lyric 000
C.12: Vergilius at the Symposion 000
C.13: E/motive Song, The Art of Writing Off Lyce 000
Chapter Five: Encomia Augusti, "Take Two" 000
C.14: EpinikionTwo-Winners and Losers 000
C.15: A Panegyric TagTwo-I Really Wanted To! 000
Notes 000
Works Cited 000
Index 000
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