A Tale of Two Cities (Dodo Press)

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Overview

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812-1870), also known as "Boz", was the foremost English novelist of the Victorian era, as well as a vigorous social campaigner. Considered one of the English language's greatest writers, he was acclaimed for his rich storytelling and memorable characters, and achieved massive worldwide popularity in his lifetime. The popularity of his novels and short stories has meant that not one has ever gone out of print. Dickens wrote serialised novels, the usual format for fiction at the time,...
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A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812-1870), also known as "Boz", was the foremost English novelist of the Victorian era, as well as a vigorous social campaigner. Considered one of the English language's greatest writers, he was acclaimed for his rich storytelling and memorable characters, and achieved massive worldwide popularity in his lifetime. The popularity of his novels and short stories has meant that not one has ever gone out of print. Dickens wrote serialised novels, the usual format for fiction at the time, and each new part of his stories was eagerly anticipated by the reading public. Among his best-known works are Sketches by Boz (1836), The Pickwick Papers (1837), Oliver Twist (1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1839), Barnaby Rudge (1841), A Christmas Carol (1843), Martin Chuzzlewit (1844), David Copperfield (1850), Bleak House (1853), Little Dorrit (1857), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1861) and Our Mutual Friend (1865).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781406554953
  • Publisher: Dodo Press
  • Publication date: 9/11/2007
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens is probably the greatest novelist England ever produced. His innate comic genius and shrewd depictions of Victorian life -- along with his memorable characters -- have made him beloved by readers the world over. In Dickens' books live some of the most repugnant villains in literature, as well as some of the most likeable (and unlikely) heroes.

Biography

Born on February 7, 1812, Charles Dickens was the second of eight children in a family burdened with financial troubles. Despite difficult early years, he became the most successful British writer of the Victorian age.

In 1824, young Charles was withdrawn from school and forced to work at a boot-blacking factory when his improvident father, accompanied by his mother and siblings, was sentenced to three months in a debtor's prison. Once they were released, Charles attended a private school for three years. The young man then became a solicitor's clerk, mastered shorthand, and before long was employed as a Parliamentary reporter. When he was in his early twenties, Dickens began to publish stories and sketches of London life in a variety of periodicals.

It was the publication of Pickwick Papers (1836-1837) that catapulted the twenty-five-year-old author to national renown. Dickens wrote with unequaled speed and often worked on several novels at a time, publishing them first in monthly installments and then as books. His early novels Oliver Twist (1837-1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1838-1839), The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1841), and A Christmas Carol (1843) solidified his enormous, ongoing popularity. As Dickens matured, his social criticism became increasingly biting, his humor dark, and his view of poverty darker still. David Copperfield (1849-1850), Bleak House (1852-1853), Hard Times (1854), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1861), and Our Mutual Friend (1864-1865) are the great works of his masterful and prolific period.

In 1858 Dickens's twenty-three-year marriage to Catherine Hogarth dissolved when he fell in love with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. The last years of his life were filled with intense activity: writing, managing amateur theatricals, and undertaking several reading tours that reinforced the public's favorable view of his work but took an enormous toll on his health. Working feverishly to the last, Dickens collapsed and died on June 8, 1870, leaving The Mystery of Edwin Drood uncompleted.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of David Copperfield.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles John Huffam Dickens (full name) "Boz" (pen name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1812
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portsmouth, England
    1. Date of Death:
      June 18, 1870
    2. Place of Death:
      Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 340 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(148)

4 Star

(68)

3 Star

(51)

2 Star

(29)

1 Star

(44)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 344 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 28, 2011

    A must read

    One of the best books ever written. It has withstood the test of time. Most worthy to be called a classic.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2011

    audiobook is not nook compatible

    The audiobook mentioned was a selling point for me. It isn't a file, but a text internet address on the very last page of the ebook that the nook does not recognize as a hyperlink. Apparently this guy Sam Ngo went and found the free ebook with illustrations and also found a free audiobook file on an archive website somewhere and wrote out the file's internet address on the last page of the book and epub'd it. You would have to look up the file online from your computer, download the audiobook and physically hook up your nook to transfer the file from your computer to your nook. So why pay this guy 1.99? Just go out and find the free files yourself. Probably deleting this.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    3/26/13

    Charles dickens,very good.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Good story, terrible copy

    Terrible jumbled nonsense. Don't get this copy!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2013

    The dynamic character

    Mrs defarge you are a very good antagonist i n desguise

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2013

    Great

    One of the greatest written book in war times

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Awesome!

    A bit tricky to understand, but its really good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2013

    LOVE

    I love reading this book. I did have to reread a few passages to get a better understanding but i still loved it. This book is not BORing YOU ARE!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 23, 2013

    "I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believes in m

    "I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believes in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live." Thus, the central theme of A Tale of Two Cities.




    I began reading this book in high school (Standard 8, I think), and I hated it. The language was completely foreign to me, and I didn't understand a single thing in it. I never finished it.




    Now that I'm more mature, and am reading many of the old classics, I decided to give it a try again. The language is still a bit foreign, and I had a rough time getting into it and following it at times, but I'm glad I finally finished this book.




    Ostensibly, the book is about the French Revolution. But I don't think it is, really. It may be set against the backdrop of the French Revolution, but it is, at its heart, a love story. And not the soppy touchy feely romantic kind of love, either. Real love. The love of a man for his friends, the love of a father and daughter, and yes, the love of a husband and wive. This book spans decades, and is about the events unfolding simultaneously in London, England, and Paris, France (hence the Two Cities) around the time of the French Revolution.




    I would recommend anyone interested in history, especially Christians, to read this book, but there's something in it for everyone.




    Only issue is, after reading the whole of Book The Second, I still had no idea just who, or what, the Golden Thread is! (And I still don't quite know)

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2012

    Love the B&N collection

    Easy read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    A Tale of Two Cities is a very long, difficult book. Therefore,

    A Tale of Two Cities is a very long, difficult book. Therefore, many people in my age group may enjoy the storyline while getting bored easily with the actual writing. The writing is beautiful, but it may be difficult to understand at first because of the higher English. I really enjoyed this book, it had a great plot and I am always a fan of stories about the French Revolution. I love how the story transports you to France for this story of brother turns on brother and of ultimate sacrifices. This story of a family battling against another for their lives is awe-insipring and there are plenty of twists to keep you on the edge of your seat. The amount of thought put into this plotline is immense, you have multiple characters that end up playing huge roles in the story. For example, Simon Carter makes the ultimate sacrifice and dies for his long-time friend so he can get out of the city alive. I think that it is completely accurate for this novel to be a classic, seeing as it highlights what happened to people during the revolution. Brother turned on brother and deep secrets were revealed for the sheer fact to reveal them. People were killed for reasons unknown and grudges could be taken out simply by hinting that someone was part of the monarchy. This caused them to be hunted down and tried for anything that might get them killed. Anyone can read this book, as long as they are willing to put in time and effort. I had to look up a few words, but it was worth it to read this story. To summarize, this book is a great book for anyone looking for a good, challenging book to read that illustrates the ups and downs of living in Revolutionary France.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    Its ok

    It is a good book and i got it for free so even better hard to read though

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 16, 2011

    just get it online

    nook can handle pdfs and there are many viable cites that have free pdf versions of this.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2001

    What a hit!

    This book is one of the very best books I have ever read. A Tale of Two Cities is so good I read it once a year just to remember how good it truly is. You can never get burnt out on this book. Ok sure, it was required reading in my high school, but had it not been required, I never would have been introduced to this marvelous book. The way Dickens portrays the two cities and his characters are vivid and well thought out. This truly is a masterpiece writing!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    Oasis and Co.s Biography

    Name: Oasis <br> Gender: Female &female <br> Age: 16 in dog years. <br> Rank: Pack Wolf <p> Appearance: A slghtly fluffy yellow wolf. She has fur that relfects light on each strand, so it looks like she sparkles. Her eyes are dark blue and sprinkled with silver. <p> Mate: None <br> Crush: Unknown <br> Pups: None <p> Personality: Hard to explain. <p> Name: Claw <br> Gender: Male &male <br> Age: 6 in dog years. <br> Rank: Pack Pup? <p> Appearance: A kinda sorta fluffy white wolf, with splotches of sliver tipping some of his fur. His silver parts are not like the black on a cow, but you know what I mean. His eyes are light brown. <p> Personality: Also hard to explain. <P> Thanks now buh-bye.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    Gear and bolts

    Gear takl gray wolf muscular looking for mate he is bi




    Bolts orge wolf sister of gear looking for a mate as well both older wolved

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2014

    Rippef

    Name- ripper, mate - none, age-5, color- white wolf with deep black eyes

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2014

    Andromeda and Phoenix

    Name: Andromeda <p>

    Nickname: Andro <p>

    Gender: Female <p>

    Rank: Regular Pack Wolf <p>

    Looks: Andro is a light red color, with a cream belly, forepaws, and chest. She looks just like her mother, Rose, and her grandmother, Willow. Her eyes are sky blue. <p>

    Mate: Spirit ((Missing but she will forever wait for him)) <p>

    Pups: Ember, Toby, Tiron, and Ocean ((All Spirit's)) <p>

    History: Andromeda was born in her mother's pack with her sister, Phoenix. She grew up there, and at two years of agewas seperated from Rose, Phoenix, and Demon, her father. She wandered for a long while before becoming Alpha Female of Nebula Pack with Spirit as her Alpha Male. The pack dissapated after many years, and she wandered until she found Phoenix, at which point they wandered together. She found Spirit once more before he dissapeared again, but this time she carried pups. She found a pack fast as possible, not wanting her pups to grow up lone wolves. <p>

    Family: <br>
    Mother ~ Rose ((Deceased)) <br>
    Father ~ Demon ((Missing)) <br>
    Grandmother ~ Willow ((Deceased))<br>
    Grandfather ~ Name Lost ((Deceased)) ((Sorry, this is all by memory.... I'll find his name soon.)) <br>
    Uncle ~ Matt ((Missing)) <p>
    Sister ~ Phoenix <p>

    <p>

    Name: Phoenix <p>

    Gender: Female <p>

    Rank: Regular Pack Wolf <p>

    Looks: Phoenix is a deep red color, like fire, which is what earned her her name. She has the typical amber eyes of a wolf. Her front left paw is white. <p>

    Mate/Crush/Pups: She hasn't found the right guy yet. <p>

    History: Like Andromeda, Phoenix was born at her mother's pack pack. At the age of two, she lost ehr sister. Her mother and father searced for many months but never found her. When her father dissapeared as well, Phoenix left. She joined a pack and quickly rose to Beta Female, but never found a mate, and left the pack when she found Andromeda. The rest matches Andromeda's history. <p>

    Family: Same except her sister is Andro, not herself. <p>

    Other: BOTH she-wolves are purebred Dire wolves, and alpha born. Very large, very dangerous when angered. <p>

    ((No I am not being a powerplayer. I have been rping this family for four years, starting with Willow, and now on these two. This is just the way it happened.))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    Test

    Testing

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 344 Customer Reviews

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