A Tale of Two Cities: The 2004 Yankee-Red Sox Rivalry and the War for the Pennant

Overview

When the Boston Red Sox faced the New York Yankees in the historic 2003 American League Championship Series, the meeting seemed to serve as the climax to perhaps the greatest rivalry in professional sports. Yet, following New York’s comeback victory in scintillating Game 7, both the Red Sox and Yankees entered the off-season without a world title—and with renewed conviction to finish the job in 2004.In A Tale of Two Cities, respected baseball writers John Harper (New York Daily News) and Tony Massarotti (Boston ...

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Overview

When the Boston Red Sox faced the New York Yankees in the historic 2003 American League Championship Series, the meeting seemed to serve as the climax to perhaps the greatest rivalry in professional sports. Yet, following New York’s comeback victory in scintillating Game 7, both the Red Sox and Yankees entered the off-season without a world title—and with renewed conviction to finish the job in 2004.In A Tale of Two Cities, respected baseball writers John Harper (New York Daily News) and Tony Massarotti (Boston Herald) chronicle the Yankees and Red Sox in parallel story lines through the summer of 2004. The authors take you behind the scenes with the teams, cities, and media during one of the most intense baseball seasons in history.

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Editorial Reviews

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"...a dickens of a story..." Associated Press feature.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781592287048
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/1/2005
  • Pages: 296
  • Sales rank: 1,062,423
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.06 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Tony Massarotti, a Boston-area native and a cum laude graduate of Tufts University,is in his fifteenth year at the Boston Herald. Now in his fifth season as a baseball columnist and his eleventh year covering the Red Sox, Massarotti was voted by his peers as the 2000 Massachusetts Sportswriter of the Year and was again a finalist for the award in 2003. He appears regularly on WEEI-AM (850) sports radio, Sports Final with Bob Lobel on Channel 4 (CBS), and New England Sports Tonight on the FOX Sports Network.John Harper has been covering baseball in New York as a beat writer or columnist for twenty-one years, the last twelve for the New York Daily News. A former college baseball player at the University of Bridgeport (Connecticut), Harper has authored three books, including an acclaimed account of the Yankees' 1996 championship season. He lives with his wife and two sons in Whippany, New Jersey.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2005

    Yankee/Red Sox rivalry from a new perspective

    Like any argument there are two sides and who better to rely on than two sportswriters who make their living covering the year-in-year out battle between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees. While this 2005 release has the familiar ring of the classic written by Charles Dickens, it took two authors to produce a work that is worthy both of the name and the plot line of this modern day baseball classic. Baseball beat writers John Harper of the New York Daily News and Tony Massarotti of the Boston Herald have shared writing space as well as barbs about their two hometown teams and now take their grievances public in ¿A Tale of Two Cities.¿ The idea for the book took shape just moments after Aaron Boone¿s ALCS-winning homer cleared the fence at Yankee Stadium in 2003. The two minds agreed that their combined beats and insights gave the reader a truthful and exciting behind the scenes look at this historic battle. Massarotti opens his first chapter just days after Boone¿s fateful, memorable shot and rolls into the firing of Boston Red Sox manager Grady Little, the placing of Manny Ramirez on waivers, the courtship and subsequent rebuff of Alex Rodriguez, the stage being set for a divorce with Nomar Garciaparra and the acquisition of Curt Schilling and Keith Foulke. Harper responds with the news that the Yankees knew of Boone¿s knee injury during a pick-up basketball game for two weeks prior to releasing it to the media as well as other teams. He explains how GM Brian Cashman worked the phones, creating the trade for A-Rod along with the selling of the former Texas Ranger on a move to third base. The Daily News beat writer also includes the clandestine efforts Cashman took to prevent word from leaking out about the trade, all before taking it to George Steinbrenner. The two authors provide insight to each team¿s manager, for Harper, the ex-skipper Grady Little as well as the newly hired Terry Francona after his unsuccessful stint with the Philadelphia Phillies. Harper takes the reader into the boardroom and private dining room of Steinbrenner as he proposes to extend Yankee skipper Joe Torre¿s contract and why the manager waffled before finally accepting. Once the 2004 season was underway, both writers give their viewpoints to key meetings between the two squads throughout the year and no subject is off limits. Read how Massarotti complains of the visiting press box at Yankee stadium, the air of New York fans and players. Harper pounds back with his own tongue-in-cheek shot about ¿Red Sox Nation¿ along with his own personal hatred of Pedro Martinez. The drama continues on and off the field as the AL pennant race heats up, in April. Pedro Martinez is without a contract, Manny Ramirez becomes a U.S. citizen, Schilling has a bum ankle and his cell phone has local sports talk radio station WEEI in its speed dial, for starters. For the Yankees, Harper reveals how boring Derek Jeter is with the media along with how fake Alex Rodriquez is with the same hoard, but at least he can give you something for your notebook. Harper also goes so far as to mock his Boston counterparts while filing on deadline after a loss to the Yankees as well as describe the difference in how the media is perceived in the two East Coast cities. The two authors focus on the competing shortstops, how Jeter exemplifies style, grace and competitiveness, while Garciaparra is often portrayed as shallow, selfish and sometimes weak. The work of these two authors who have the pleasure of writing about these two ball clubs comes together brilliantly as their passion of the game and their beats glows on the work¿s pages. Whether you bleed Yankee Blue or are a card carrying member of Red Sox Nation, ¿A Tale of Two Cities¿ must become a part of your baseball collection.

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