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A Teen's Guide to Going Vegetarian
     

A Teen's Guide to Going Vegetarian

5.0 2
by Judy Krizmanic, Matthew Wawiorka (Illustrator), T. Colin Campbell (Foreword by)
 

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Every day, all across America, more and more teenagers are going vegetarian--and here's the book that has all the answers they want and need. The guide covers all the bases--from nutritional requirements to dealing with anxious parents and friends--and includes some easy beginner's recipes. It all adds up to the most comprehensive, accessible book of its kind.

Overview

Every day, all across America, more and more teenagers are going vegetarian--and here's the book that has all the answers they want and need. The guide covers all the bases--from nutritional requirements to dealing with anxious parents and friends--and includes some easy beginner's recipes. It all adds up to the most comprehensive, accessible book of its kind.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Punctuating his writing with short quotes drawn from interviews with young people, Wormser (Hoboes) discusses issues faced by Muslims in America. First he outlines basic tenets of the religion, then focuses on two quite different groups, immigrants from the Middle East and African Americans. He emphasizes matters relevant to teens, such as navigating the strict codes of Islamic dating, dealing with peer pressure, and adapting ancient customs to modern life. On the whole, his account tends to idealize his subjects. For example, after introducing the popularly held belief that ``Muslim men rule the household,'' the author quotes a Muslim (male): ``It doesn't make sense to try and dominate your wife.... Islam teaches that the man has the final decision in the family, but you should always discuss things with your wife and try to reach a joint decision.'' Elsewhere Wormser resorts to generalizations: ``Most Muslim students are comfortable with their religion.'' And while a chapter on the Nation of Islam perceptively suggests reasons for the increasing popularity of Islam among African Americans, the racist and anti-Semitic comments by leaders of the Nation are tacitly presented as reactions to years of oppression. Ages 12-up. (Dec.)
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-Breezy, upbeat, conversational writing enlivens this book. The information is divided into three broad areas. The first section presents definitions of various kinds of vegetarianism and reasons for giving up meat. Living with the decision; defending it to family, friends, and others; and surviving in a primarily meat-eating world is the focus of the second part. The concluding section contains nutrition facts, recipes, and meal-planning suggestions. Paragraphs are short with bulleted lists and heavy use of bold type to attract readers' attention. Young people are quoted, increasing the book's appeal for its targeted audience. Attractive woodcuts appear at the beginning of each chapter. This title provides more information and has a lighter style than Charles Salter's The Vegetarian Teen (Millbrook, 1991) or Lila Perl's Eating the Vegetarian Way (Morrow, 1980; o.p.).-Lois McCulley, Wichita Falls High School, TX

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140365894
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/01/1994
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.63(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

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A Teen's Guide to Going Vegetarian 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was extremely useful because it gives recipes, tells stories of other teen vegetarians, and gives advice on how to tell friends and family. Great book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great book for teens who want to be vegetarians, it is very inspiring!! It gives you great advice, and great information on why being a vegeterian is so great!