A Treasury of 20th Century Murder: The Lindbergh Child - America's Hero and the Crime of the Century

A Treasury of 20th Century Murder: The Lindbergh Child - America's Hero and the Crime of the Century

by Rick Geary
     
 

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Lindbergh’s baby disappears! Geary retraces all the different highly publicized events, blackmail notes, false and otherwise, as well as the string of colorful characters wanting to ‘help,’ some of which actually successfully snookered the beleaguered hero.

Overview

Lindbergh’s baby disappears! Geary retraces all the different highly publicized events, blackmail notes, false and otherwise, as well as the string of colorful characters wanting to ‘help,’ some of which actually successfully snookered the beleaguered hero.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Following his multivolume, nonfiction Treasury of Victorian Murder, Geary moves into the 20th century with a study of the 1932 kidnap-killing of celebrity aviator Charles A. Lindbergh's infant son. Not knowing their son was already dead, the little boy's parents negotiated for months with the kidnapper, while a swarm of quirky characters in search of money or glory rushed to "help." This macabre carnival could give a writer excuses for burlesque or melodrama, but Geary prefers to hold his subject at arm's length to examine it carefully. He delineates the large cast clearly while also exploring the case's presumably reliable physical evidence, and his crisp pen and ink style cleverly emphasizes the period snapshot appearance of places and people, especially the enigmatic Bruno Richard Hauptmann, who was convicted and eventually executed for the crime. There are reasons to doubt at least whether Hauptmann was the only criminal, but Geary refuses to conjecture beyond the evidence, despite his bemused understanding of how many of the people involved in the case lost their self-control. This thoughtful retelling of one of the century's most notorious crimes deserves several readings. (Sept.)

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KLIATT - George Galuschak
The kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby is one of the most famous crimes of the 20th century. Here are the facts: the son of famed aviator Charles Lindbergh is taken from the crib of his second-floor nursery, and a ransom note is left on a radiator cover. The case soon becomes a circus, attracting hucksters, well-wishers, attention seekers, state troopers, wood identification experts and mobsters. Lindbergh pays the ransom, but the baby is never returned and his remains are discovered months later. The ransom money (the serial numbers are recorded) leads to Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant who declares his innocence. After a sensational trial, some of which is immortalized in newsreel, Hauptmann is found guilty and sent to the electric chair. This is a well-researched account of one of the most controversial true crime cases in American history. The text is full of interesting trivia: we learn that the Lindbergh baby slept with wire thumb guards, and that Hauptmann folded his bills into eight sections. The b/w art is chockfull of details, including a map of Lindbergh's house and a diagram of the ladder used to reach the baby. The author states the case for and against Hauptmann, as well as a few of the inevitable conspiracy theories, most of which are ludicrous. Recommended for middle and high school graphic novel collections, especially those catering to true crime enthusiasts. Reviewer: George Galuschak
School Library Journal

Gr 10 Up

Geary brings his excellent and attractive pen-and-ink style to this fascinating account of an infamous case of the early 1930s. In March of 1932, the child of famed aviator Charles Lindbergh was kidnapped from his parents' home in Hopewell, NJ, and the family began to receive a series of ransom notes. However, the subsequent investigation turned up very few plausible leads, and when the child's remains were found, the case became one of murder. Although the suspected killer was arrested, tried, and sentenced to death, many questions about his guilt-and about the nature of the crime itself-remain to this day. Using well-researched text and appealing art, Geary expertly recounts the crime's setting, the colorful characters involved (on both sides of the law), the communication between the kidnapper and Lindbergh, and the evidence both for and against Richard Hauptmann, the murder suspect. A good example of the origins of modern forensics, crime-scene investigation, and celebrity hysteria, this work is an excellent choice for most collections.-Dave Inabnitt, Brooklyn Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561635290
Publisher:
N B M Publishing Company
Publication date:
08/28/2008
Series:
Treasury of XXth Century Murder Series
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

An award-winning cartoonist and illustrator, Rick Geary has worked for Marvel Entertainment Group, DC Comics, Dark Horse Comics, and Heavy Metal, and has contributed to National Lampoon and The New York Times Book Review.

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