A Treatise Concerning The Principles Of Human Knowledge (Dodo Press)

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Overview

George Berkeley (1685-1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley, was an influential Irish philosopher whose primary philosophical achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism" (later referred to as "subjective idealism" by others). This theory, summed up in his dictum, "Esse est percipi" ("To be is to be perceived"), contends that individuals can only directly know sensations and ideas of objects, not abstractions such as "matter." His most widely-read works are: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710) and Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous (1713) wherein characters Philonous and Hylas represent Berkeley himself and his contemporary Locke. In 1734 he published The Analyst, a critique of the foundations of calculus, which was influential in the development of mathematics.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781406552706
  • Publisher: Dodo Press
  • Publication date: 8/3/2007
  • Pages: 92
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.22 (d)

Meet the Author

Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley. He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College, Dublin, completing a Master's degree in 1707. He remained at Trinity College after completion of his degree as a tutor and Greek lecturer.

His earliest publication was on mathematics, but the first that brought him notice was his Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision, first published in 1709. In the essay, Berkeley examines visual distance, magnitude, position and problems of sight and touch. While this work raised much controversy at the time, its conclusions are now accepted as an established part of the theory of optics.

The next publication to appear was the Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge in 1710, which was followed in 1713 by Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, in which he propounded his system of philosophy, the leading principle of which is that the world, as represented by our senses, depends for its existence, as such, on being perceived. [wholly excerpted from Wikipedia]
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Table of Contents

How to Use this Book 3
Editor's Introduction 5
1 Preamble 5
2 Berkeley's Life 6
3 The Target (or, What Berkeley didn't Believe) 11
4 Berkeley's Metaphysical Picture 14
5 What Happens in the Principles? 17
6 The Arguments of Principles [actual symbol not reproducible] 20
7 Berkeley's Attack on the Doctrine of Abstract Ideas 28
8 Abstract Ideas in the Principles 34
9 The Existence of God 37
10 Physical Reality 41
11 Scepticism 45
12 Berkeley and the Progress of Science 50
13 The Nature of Spirits 54
14 Berkeley's Intellectual Antecedents 58
15 The Berkeley-Johnson Correspondence 67
The Text Printed in this Edition 70
Bibliography and Further Reading 72
Analysis of the Principles 76
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge 85
The Berkeley-Johnson Correspondence 163
Glossary 189
Notes to the Principles 194
Notes to the Berkeley-Johnson Correspondence 218
Index 229
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