A Treatise of Human Nature (Dover Philosophical Classics Series

Overview


Hume's comprehensive effort to form an observationally grounded study of human nature employs John Locke's empiric principles to construct a theory of knowledge from which to evaluate metaphysical ideas. A key to modern studies of 18th-century Western philosophy, the Treatise considers numerous classic philosophical issues, including causation, existence, freedom and necessity, and morality.
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A Treatise of Human Nature

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Overview


Hume's comprehensive effort to form an observationally grounded study of human nature employs John Locke's empiric principles to construct a theory of knowledge from which to evaluate metaphysical ideas. A key to modern studies of 18th-century Western philosophy, the Treatise considers numerous classic philosophical issues, including causation, existence, freedom and necessity, and morality.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486432502
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 11/17/2003
  • Series: Dover Philosophical Classics Series
  • Pages: 480
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 8.18 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction ix
Book I. Of the Understanding
Part I. Of ideas; their origin, composition, abstraction, connexion, &c.
I. Of the origin of our ideas 1
II. Division of the subject 5
III. Of the ideas of the memory and imagination 6
IV. Of the connexion or association of ideas 7
V. Of relations 9
VI. Of modes and substances 11
VII. Of abstract ideas 12
Part II. Of the ideas of space and time
I. Of the infinite divisibility of our ideas of space and time 19
II. Of the infinite divisibility of space and time 21
III. Of the other qualities of our ideas of space and time 24
IV. Objections answer'd 28
V. The same subject continu'd 38
VI. Of the idea of existence and of external existence 47
Part III. Of knowledge and probability
I. Of knowledge 50
II. Of probability; and of the idea of cause and effect 53
III. Why a cause is always necessary 57
IV. Of the component parts of our reasonings concerning causes and effect 59
V. Of the impressions of the senses and memory 61
VI. Of the inference from the impression to the idea 62
VII. Of the nature of the idea, or belief 68
VIII. Of the causes of belief 71
IX. Of the effects of other relations, and other habits 77
X. Of the influence of belief 85
XI. Of the probability of chances 89
XII. Of the probability of causes 94
XIII. Of unphilosophical probability 103
XIV. Of the idea of necessary connexion 111
XV. Rules by which to judge of causes and effects 124
XVI. Of the reason of animals 126
Part IV. Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy
I. Of scepticism with regard to reason 129
II. Of scepticism with regard to the senses 134
III. Of the antient philosophy 157
IV. Of the modern philosophy 161
V. Of the immateriality of the soul 166
VI. Of personal identity 179
VII. Conclusion of this book 188
Book II. Of the Passions
Part I. Of pride and humility
I. Division of the subject 196
II. Of pride and humility; their objects and causes 197
III. Whence these objects and causes are deriv'd 199
IV. Of the relations of impressions and ideas 201
V. Of the influence of these relations on pride and humility 203
VI. Limitations of this system 207
VII. Of vice and virtue 210
VIII. Of beauty and deformity 212
IX. Of external advantages and disadvantages 216
X. Of property and riches 220
XI. Of the love of fame 225
XII. Of the pride and humility of animals 231
Part II. Of love and hatred
I. Of the objects and causes of love and hatred 234
II. Experiments to confirm this system 236
III. Difficulties solv'd 247
IV. Of the love of relations 250
V. Of our esteem for the rich and powerful 254
VI. Of benevolence and anger 260
VII. Of compassion 262
VIII. Of malice and envy 264
IX. Of the mixture of benevolence and anger with compassion and malice 271
X. Of respect and contempt 277
XI. Of the amorous passion, or love betwixt the sexes 280
XII. Of the love and hatred of animals 282
Part III. Of the will and direct passions
I. Of liberty and necessity 284
II. The same subject continu'd 290
III. Of the influencing motives of the will 293
IV. Of the causes of the violent passions 297
V. Of the effects of custom 300
VI. Of the influence of the imagination on the passions 301
VII. Of contiguity and distance in space and time 304
VIII. The same subject continu'd 307
IX. Of the direct passions 311
X. Of curiosity, or the love of truth 319
Book III. Of Morals
Part I. Of virtue and vice in general
I. Moral distinctions not deriv'd from reason 324
II. Moral distinctions deriv'd from a moral sense 334
Part II. Of justice and injustice
I. Justice, whether a natural or artificial virtue 339
II. Of the origin of justice and property 344
III. Of the rules that determine property 356
IV. Of the transference of property by consent 366
V. Of the obligation of promises 367
VI. Some farther reflexions concerning justice and injustice 374
VII. Of the origin of government 380
VIII. Of the source of allegiance 384
IX. Of the measures of allegiance 391
X. Of the objects of allegiance 394
XI. Of the laws of nations 404
XII. Of chastity and modesty 406
Part III. Of the other virtues and vices
I. Of the origin of the natural virtues and vices 409
II. Of greatness of mind 422
III. Of goodness and benevolence 429
IV. Of natural abilities 432
V. Some farther reflexions concerning the natural virtues 437
VI. Conclusion of this book 440
Appendix 443
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 20, 2010

    The master skeptic

    Hume sets out rather brilliantly the problems of induction. It is a great read for those new to philosophy, it hits on virtually all philosophical cylinders and debunks them all as an absolute. Like existentialism, Humes skepticisms points its finger at humanities preconceived notions and challenges us to think critically upon everything.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    Essential for the philosopher/skeptic.

    This book is terrific. It is the cheapest version of the treatise that I could find, but its great. However, it is fairly abstruse, and I don't recommend it for an inexperienced reader.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2010

    Great read!

    Great read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2007

    An Essential Work to the Philosopher's Library

    Hume's Treatise of Human Nature is chronicled as a must-read for philosophers. It has such a gamut of philosophical quandries and relative understandings about the machinations of the human mind. The language used by this 18th century philosopher is a little difficult at times, though nothing too contrary to make it unreadable.

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    Posted September 11, 2010

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    Posted August 15, 2010

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    Posted January 5, 2009

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    Posted March 28, 2011

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    Posted February 26, 2010

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