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A Vegan Taste of East Africa
     

A Vegan Taste of East Africa

3.0 1
by Linda Majzlik
 

A vast region of climactic and geographic extremes, East Africa is often characterized as a wasteland of the tastebuds, where harsh conditions lead to basic, flavorless food. This vegan cookbook dispells that myth, showcasing East Africa's hearty, healthy, and delectable ingredients—from sweet potatoes and cassava to sorghum, spices, and savory curries.

Overview

A vast region of climactic and geographic extremes, East Africa is often characterized as a wasteland of the tastebuds, where harsh conditions lead to basic, flavorless food. This vegan cookbook dispells that myth, showcasing East Africa's hearty, healthy, and delectable ingredients—from sweet potatoes and cassava to sorghum, spices, and savory curries. Italian, Indian, and Portuguese influences combine with native African traditions and tastes to create a truly unique regional flavor. The cookbook's adventurous recipes sample the best animal-free ingredients of the region to create easy-to-make and easy-to-enjoy vegan meals.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781897766972
Publisher:
Jon Carpenter Publishing
Publication date:
04/28/2006
Series:
Vegan Cookbooks Series
Pages:
107
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.34(d)

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A Vegan Taste of East Africa 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
VeganRican More than 1 year ago
The Presentation As cook books go this is no-frills. You will find some good recipes that cover the cuisine from Kenya, Ethiopia, Sundan, and Eritrea, as well as descriptions of the ingredients, but that's about it. I've eaten Ethiopian food countless times, but nothing from the other countries and would've liked some illustrations as a guide. I don't know if Linda made any of these dishes, but the way this book is presented I get a feeling that she hasn't. Of course, I could be wrong, but the book lacks the personal touch most Vegan cookbooks have. It's nice to read about the author's experiences with certain dishes/recipes and possible variations on them, but there is none of this this. However, I do like the brief history of food in that region, which was very interesting. Beginners in the Kitchen and New Vegans There isn't a lot of information for beginners who have little experience cooking. If you know how to cook and are familiar with this cuisine, the recipes should be a breeze, but if you are new to Veganism and the kitchen, there are much better books to start off with, such as How It All Vegan. However, you should definitely add this book to your collection at some point as well as the author's several other regional/ethnic cuisine books. One final note, some of the recipes call for the use of aubergine and I went to all the markets in the area looking for this vegetable to no avail. No one I knew, and I know a lot of foodies, knew what it was. Finally, I did a search on the web and it turns out that aubergine is a fancy way of saying Eggplant. Call me a Brooklyn boy, but I had never heard of aubergine my whole life until I read this book (thanks for expanding my vocabulary) and I've been cooking with Eggplant since my teens. Anyway, enjoy this book. It's worth purchase.