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A Wasp Is Not a Bee
     

A Wasp Is Not a Bee

by Marilyn Singer, Patrick O'Brien (Illustrator)
 

Most people know the difference between a cat and a dog. But the differences between certain other animals are not so obviuos, which is why it's so easy to confuse them.

You may guess that the insect trying to eat your icecream cone is a bee, but it's probably a yellow-jacket wasp. You may think that the chimp sitting in a tree in the forest is a monkey, but it's

Overview

Most people know the difference between a cat and a dog. But the differences between certain other animals are not so obviuos, which is why it's so easy to confuse them.

You may guess that the insect trying to eat your icecream cone is a bee, but it's probably a yellow-jacket wasp. You may think that the chimp sitting in a tree in the forest is a monkey, but it's really an ape. How can you tell these and other similar animals apart? By using your eyes, ears, and all your senses to observe them—and by reading this book.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Singer describes the distinguishing physical and behavioral characteristics of 14 pairs of similar-looking animals. She differentiates between frogs and toads, koalas and bears, butterflies and moths, whales and fish, etc. Attractive watercolor and gouache paintings of the animals in their natural habitats appear on almost every page. The text is clearly written and logically organized, but it omits some useful information. For instance, while readers learn that ``...a honeybee dies after it stings you. But a yellow jacket does not,'' there is no explanation as to why this is so. Lynda Graham-Barber's Toad or Frog, Swamp or Bog (Four Winds, 1994) examines 18 pairs of look-alikes in the animal kingdom as well as a few examples of wrongly identified weather phenomena, plant species, etc. It is generally more detailed than A Wasp Is Not a Bee and includes some statistics. Libraries owning that title can skip this one.-Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library
April Judge
Did you ever wonder why a crocodile is not an alligator or why a bat is not a bird? This slim, informative book adequately answers those questions as well as 12 additional ones about other similar but different animal pairs. The physical characteristics of each animal are accurately compared and contrasted with those of its counterpart. Full-color realistic illustrations of each animal accompany the readable text. This interesting, factual book presents curious young animal detectives with the basic methods of observation to identify differences and similarities in animals they regularly encounter.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805028201
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
09/15/1995
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.36(w) x 10.32(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Marilyn Singer has a real affinity for animals and at various stages of her life has shared her household with dogs, cats, pigeons, chinchillas, crows, turtles, and parakeets. She is the author of many books including the poetry collection Turtle in July and the nonfiction work Exotic Birds.

She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, their standard poodle, named Easy, and several other pets.

Patrick O'Brien got degree in biology before going on to study art. He's been interested in wildlife illustration since he was a child and wanted to be a wildlife researcher while he was growing up. Now he gets to study the animals and draw them without ever leaving his desk.

He lives in Baltimore, Maryland, with his wife and their cat.

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