A Whole Empire Walking: Refugees in Russia during World War I [NOOK Book]

Overview

"... a signal contribution to a growing literature on a phenomenon
that has become tragically pervasive in the 20th century.... This highly original
account combines exemplary empirical research with the judicious application of
diverse methods to explore the far-reaching ramifications of 'a whole empire
...

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A Whole Empire Walking: Refugees in Russia during World War I

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Overview

"... a signal contribution to a growing literature on a phenomenon
that has become tragically pervasive in the 20th century.... This highly original
account combines exemplary empirical research with the judicious application of
diverse methods to explore the far-reaching ramifications of 'a whole empire
walking.'" -- Vucinich Prize citation

"An important
contribution not only to modern Russian history but also to an ongoing repositioning
of Russia in broader European and world historical processes.... elegantly
written... highly innovative." -- Europe-Asia Studies

Drawing on previously unused archival material in Russia, Latvia,
and Armenia and on insights from social and critical theory, Peter Gatrell considers
the origins of displacement and its political implications and provides a close
analysis of humanitarian initiatives and the relationships between refugees and the
communities in which they settled.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Peter Gatrell teaches modern European history and economic history at the University of Manchester, where he is presently Professor and Head of Department. His previous books include The Tsarist Economy 1850-1917 and Government, Industry and Rearmament in Russia, 1900- 1914.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Humanity Uprooted
1. War and the Origins of
Involuntary Displacement
2. The Politics of Refugeedom
3.
Resettlement and Relief of Refugees
4. Consolidating Refugeedom
5.
Refugees and Gender
6. Refugees and the Labor Market
7. Refugees
and the Construction of "National" Identity
8. Revolution and
Refugeedom
Conclusion: The Meanings of Refugeedom
Appendix 1.
Refugee Population Statistics
Appendix 2. Questionnaire Issued by the
Tatiana Committee, January
1917
Abbreviations
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2001

    Winner of the 2000 AAASS Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize

    CITATION FOR WAYNE S. VUCINICH BOOK PRIZE, for an outstanding monograph in Russian, Eurasian, or East European studies in any discipline of the humanities, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, co-funded by AAASS and the Center for Russian and East European Studies at Stanford University. This study offers a history of the refugee population from the western borderlands that swamped the administration and inhabitants of central Russia during the Great War. Adducing an impressive array of archival funds and contemporary accounts about and by the refugees themselves, Gatrell traces the story of the people displaced, by German and Russian forces alike, from the ethnically and religiously diverse territories of western Russia. He also considers the perspective of those charged with accommodating them: overburdened bureaucrats, charitable societies, and everyday townspeople and peasants in whose midst the refugees settled. Gatrell draws on theoretical perspectives, ranging from the work of Michel Foucault to recent studies of refugees in the late twentieth century, to examine the various ways in which refugeedom evolved as a set of discourses incorporating gender and nationhood, among other categories. The resulting study lends yet more depth and nuance to our understanding of the autocracy¿s unraveling, as well as to our understanding of the successor states that emerged from its wreckage. Equally, Gatrell makes a signal contribution to a growing literature on a phenomenon that has became tragically pervasive in the twentieth century, from Russia to India to Rwanda to the Balkans. This highly original account combines exemplary empirical research with the judicious application of diverse methods to explore the far-reaching ramifications of ¿a whole empire walking.¿ (The prize was presented in November 2000 at the 32nd National Convention of the AAASS, in Denver, Colorado).

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