A World After an Asteroid Strike

Overview

Can you imagine what our lives would be like after a devastating asteroid strike? What effect would the resulting tsunami, storms, and dust cloud have? What would happen to the climate, wildlife, and our food supplies? This book traces the possible consequences of a global event on this scale, with ideas and evidence based on similar scenarios that are a part of fact and fiction.

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Overview

Can you imagine what our lives would be like after a devastating asteroid strike? What effect would the resulting tsunami, storms, and dust cloud have? What would happen to the climate, wildlife, and our food supplies? This book traces the possible consequences of a global event on this scale, with ideas and evidence based on similar scenarios that are a part of fact and fiction.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Caitlin Marineau
65 million years ago, an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, clearing the way for mammals and eventually humans, to dominate the planet. Could such a catastrophic event happen again? How would people and governments cope when attempting to deal with such a disaster? Woolf explores these questions and lays out a plausible scenario for events around the world in the wake of a large asteroid striking the planet. This title joins other books in the “A World After…” series, which looks at the potential consequences of global disasters, such as nuclear war or plague. While keeping the science and small chances of such an event in mind, An Asteroid Strike, lays out a frightening and believable sequence of events. Woolf discusses the impacts on the planet and the environment, including increased volcanic activity and earthquakes, tsunamis, impact winter, global warming, and the destruction of the ozone layer, while also looking at how these would impact human society. The growth of refugee camps and decrease in food production around the world could cause and increase and disease and famine, fueling violence and unrest. Woolf also looks at potential methods for detecting and deflecting or destroying asteroids to avoid such an event. Though the conceit is frightening, the book ends on a note of hope about human ingenuity and resilience. Students will absorb plenty of science while reading these potential real-world scenarios; possibilities for avoiding the tragedy altogether are provided. The title also includes an index, glossary, and additional resources. Reviewer: Caitlin Marineau; Ages 11 to 14.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781432976231
  • Publisher: Heinemann-Raintree
  • Publication date: 7/1/2013
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 816,672
  • Lexile: 1140L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Alex Woolf played the drums and travelled on his motorbike before settling down as an author. His "Chronosphere" trilogy, a science fiction adventure set in the 22nd century, is published by Scribo.
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