Aani and the Tree Huggers

Aani and the Tree Huggers

by Jeannine Atkins, Venantius J. Pinto
     
 

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One day Aani is resting against her favorite tree when she hears the unfamiliar roar of trucks. She alerts the village women, the eldest of whom says the sounds are made by men from the city who have come to cut down the trees. The women explain to the cutters that their trees provide the villagers with food and fuel; are home to animals; and prevent erosion. But

Overview

One day Aani is resting against her favorite tree when she hears the unfamiliar roar of trucks. She alerts the village women, the eldest of whom says the sounds are made by men from the city who have come to cut down the trees. The women explain to the cutters that their trees provide the villagers with food and fuel; are home to animals; and prevent erosion. But the men are heedless. As the cutters move closer, Aani acts with quiet, instinctive heroism to save not only her special tree, but also the village's beloved forest.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
The modern-day chipko movement draws its inspiration from a 17th century legend about a woman who mobilized villagers to save their trees from the Maharaja's soldiers, and lost her life in the process. This link from the past, essential in demonstrating the significance of the present-day movement, is absent from this book. The artwork seems to be one-dimensional and static in contrast to a story where the plot moves swiftly and whose characters display changing and powerful emotions. The artist says he has drawn on styles of north Indian miniature painting, but the work does not portray the delicacy of design and the facial emotion typical in most of those schools, only the "figures... in profile." Aani is a young girl in the story, but in the pictures she is represented as a young woman, also the adult voice seems too much in evidence.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
In India in 1970, young Aani and other village women defended their forest from developers by wrapping their arms around each tree, making it impossible for the trees to be cut down. In a moving picture book, Atkins tells their story. Today, councils meet within most villages to decide how many trees can be cut without endangering the land. The painting were inspired by 17th century styles of northern Indian miniature painting. A memorable story.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-When Aani hears strange rumblings ``as angry as a tiger's growl'' in the distance, she alerts the village women to the invasion of men from the city who intend to cut down trees in the nearby forest. The women drop their chores to view the destruction of the trees that provide so many necessities-wood for cooking and building, shelter for animals, fruits and berries to eat. Kalawati, a village elder, tries to stop them, but is rudely ignored by these men who have official, written orders to proceed. But when Aani's favorite tree is threatened, she sets a bold example of passive resistance by hugging it. Atkins has developed a highly sympathetic character in Aani, as well as a clear picture of life in a rural Indian community. Pinto's artwork corresponds by giving readers insight into the colors and scenes of the country. Endnotes explain both the story's basis on a true incident and the gouache illustrations based on 17th-century styles of Indian miniature painting prior to Western influence. An exemplary first picture book for both author and illustrator, this collaboration will appeal to a wide audience of children, as well as prove useful in units on India or international environmental efforts.-Tana Elias, Meadowridge Branch Library, Madison, WI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584300045
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Pages:
28
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
650L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 Years

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