The Abolition of Man [NOOK Book]

Overview

"We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst."

The Abolition of Man is a social commentary on the ills which Lewis believes has been bred by the aspirations of modernity. Lewis' argument is accurate in that he considers much of modernity to have a destructive effect on man, otherwise an ability to "abolish" man.

This book was first delivered as a series ...
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The Abolition of Man

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Overview

"We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst."

The Abolition of Man is a social commentary on the ills which Lewis believes has been bred by the aspirations of modernity. Lewis' argument is accurate in that he considers much of modernity to have a destructive effect on man, otherwise an ability to "abolish" man.

This book was first delivered as a series of three lectures at the Riddell Memorial Lectures on February 24–26, 1943. This electronic edition features an active table of contents and footnotes.

The Abolition of Man is part of The Fig Classic Series. To view more books in our catalog, visit us at fig-books.com.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015694802
  • Publisher: Fig
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 131
  • Sales rank: 100,568
  • File size: 175 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

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(13)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

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1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2012

    Favorite book of all time

    This book is the most concise treatment of postmodernism--and all of its absurdities--that I have ever read. This is my fourth time through it and its better than the last. Definitely my favorite book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2012

    Great Read

    This is a short concise reading. It captures you from the first to the last sentence. In between it offers you great knowledge and respective concept. It analyzes each of its claims and deliver them with example which widen the understanding of the reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2007

    A real gem

    It is amazing to me to see how long the author's wisdom abides on this planet. My intellect was very much stimulated by the profound understanding of the author regarding morality and 'Man's conquest of Nature.' It became clear to me that the human institution consists not only of body, but soul also. A whole new perspective on life can be learned from this very small book. The precipice reached in this title is this for sure: 'He who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life' (RSV-John 12:25). There surely is a prophetic touch to this powerful dissertation. If you seek to understand the 'signs of the times,' don't let this book pass you by!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2012

    Evil girls castle room

    Step into the first of two sleeping quarters for evil girls & their guests. The is made entirely of ice except for the thick bedding materials. It is a violetish shade of ice. It has four beds, two king & two queen.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Love Lewis, great copy!

    I love C.S. Lewis, and this is a brilliant work. The formatting for this copy is very easy to read and true to the Harper Collins form.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Great Read

    Lewis tackles the very daunting subjects of ethics and reason in this short but gratifying read. However this book is not for the faint of heart and can be difficult to understand at times.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2007

    A reviewer

    Lewis once again says it like it is, and once more he leaves me challenged at his message and staggered at his endless intellectual depth.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2001

    A Great Book of the Western World

    Despite its brevity (just over 100 pages), Lewis' *Abolition* get my vote as one of the great books of the 20th Century. The argument of the book is (in my opinion) a devastating critique of the moral subjectivism that is required by a Darwinian account of human morality. Of those who would, on the one hand, assure us that moral judgments are merely descriptions of personal sentiment and, on the other, affirm some set of cherished values (while exhorting others to do the same), Lewis writes, 'They castrate and bid the geldings to be fruitful.' The argument of Chapter Two, 'The Way,' is a gem, echoing (whether wittingly or not)the Kantian critique of empirical traditions in morality that would seek to derive moral laws from our knowledge of human nature or of the circumstances in which humans are placed. Both Lewis and Kant show that the resulting morality is a morality in name only.

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    Posted May 31, 2011

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    Posted January 28, 2011

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews

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