About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design

Overview

"The following description is for the second edition of About Face. The 3rd Edtion, About Face 3 (ISBN 0470084111), is now available."

First published seven years ago-just before the World Wide Web exploded into dominance in the software world-About Face rapidly became a bestseller. While the ideas and principles in the original book remain as relevant as ever, the examples in About Face 2.0 are updated to reflect the evolution of the Web.

...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (35) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $19.04   
  • Used (30) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$19.04
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(169)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0764526413 BRAND NEW NEVER USED IN STOCK 125,000+ HAPPY CUSTOMERS SHIP EVERY DAY WITH FREE TRACKING NUMBER

Ships from: fallbrook, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$32.74
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(53)

Condition: New
"New, ships through UPS and DHL. Excellent customer service. Satisfaction guaranteed!! "

Ships from: STERLING HEIGHTS, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$45.03
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
Hardcover New in new dust jacket. Brand New US edition, 3-5 days shipping!

Ships from: foxboro, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

"The following description is for the second edition of About Face. The 3rd Edtion, About Face 3 (ISBN 0470084111), is now available."

First published seven years ago-just before the World Wide Web exploded into dominance in the software world-About Face rapidly became a bestseller. While the ideas and principles in the original book remain as relevant as ever, the examples in About Face 2.0 are updated to reflect the evolution of the Web.

Interaction Design professionals are constantly seeking to ensure that software and software-enabled products are developed with the end-user's goals in mind, that is, to make them more powerful and enjoyable for people who use them. About Face 2.0 ensures that these objectives are met with the utmost ease and efficiency.

Alan Cooper (Palo Alto, CA) has spent a decade making high-tech products easier to use and less expensive to build-a practice known as "Interaction Design." Cooper is now the leader in this growing field. Mr. Cooper is also the author of two bestselling books that are widely considered indispensable texts. About Face: The Essentials of User Interface Design, intro-duced the first comprehensive set of practical design principles. The Inmates Are Running the Asylum explains how talented people and companies continually create aggravating high-tech products that fail to meet customer expectations.

Robert Reimann has spent the past 15 years pushing the boundaries of digital products as a designer, writer, lecturer, and consultant. He has led dozens of interaction design projects in domains including e-commerce, portals, desktop productivity, authoring environments, medical and scientific instrumentation, wireless, and handheld devices for startups and Fortune 500 clients alike. Joining Cooper in 1996, Reimann led the development and refinement of many goal-directed design methods described in About Face 2.0. He has lectured on these methods at major universities and to international industry audiences. He is a member of the advisory board of the UC Berkeley Institute of Design.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
When About Face was first published in 1995, the field of user interface design had barely been conceived. In Alan Cooper’s vivid words, “a small cadre of people brave enough to hold the title User Interface Designer operated under the shadow of software engineering, rather like the tiny, quick-witted mammals that scrambled under the shadows of hulking tyrannosaurs.” The rest is history.

For one thing, the Web took off. Even though HTML user interfaces were (and are) horribly primitive, the Web forced us to recognize that poor design kills products -- and businesses. Of course, many underlying issues of software design and behavior apply both on the Web and off. (Some even apply in “embedded systems” that require human interaction -- as many luxury car owners have recently discovered.)

Something else fueled the incredible growth in interaction design: Alan Cooper’s About Face itself. Not merely a manifesto, it offered practical design principles and new ways of thinking about building software for humans. Unfortunately, we still have a long way to go. We could use more of Alan Cooper’s help. And here it is: About Face 2.0.

Cooper’s insights are unified by one powerful idea: organize software development around people, not technology. Meaning what? Among other things: Understand users’ goals -- not just the tasks they perform to achieve them. Design first, code second. Separate design and programming responsibilities. Design for behavior, not form -- otherwise, you’ll spent months “iterating” out bad interactions and still wind up with a deeply flawed product.

Cooper and Robert Reimann weave together strategy and tactics -- an approach that’s as reasonable as it is rare. After all, you can’t just “follow a cookbook” (or for that matter, a style guide). There’s no “perfect dialog box” for every user. What’s more, many crucial design issues go far deeper than the surface of a CRT. So Cooper offers powerful tools for understanding your users and how they interact with software.

But without specific, on-the-ground advice for using interface elements like buttons and drop-down boxes, you’ll never get from airy theory to working software. So that’s here, too -- plenty of it.

As you’d expect, this book’s radically different from its predecessor. To begin with, it’s been reorganized to be far easier to use. Section I focuses on process and high-level ideas. What is “goal-directed design”? What makes good software design? What are the best ways to observe users? How do you define “personas”: the types of users who’ll use your software?

Section II introduces a powerful high-level language of interaction design. Cooper defines terms like “software posture,” “excise,” “inflection,” “orchestration,” and “flow” -- and brings powerful new insights to universal features like Undo and Save. You’ll learn proven techniques for making software both smart and considerate (yes, you can do both); for improving data entry and retrieval; and for supporting widely diverse users.

Section III drills down to the details: mouse interactions, window behaviors, menus, controls, toolbars, and dialog boxes; eliminating errors; productive communication with users; even clearer, simpler installations. The book concludes with detailed coverage of the specific challenges of design for the Web, wireless devices; appliances; and kiosks. About Face is just about as definitive as a book on software design can be. Again. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

From the Publisher
“…very informative and challenging…ought to be read by any one who makes any claim to design user interfaces. Highly recommended..” (ACCU, 13th February, 2005)

"...provides detailed and easily readable information on interaction design..." (M2 Best Books, 23 July 2003)

"developers have a lot to learn from this book..." (Managing Information, April 2004)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764526411
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/17/2003
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 7.43 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Alan Cooper is a pioneering software inventor, programmer, designer, and theorist. He is credited with creating what many regard as the first serious business software for microcomputers, and is widely known as the "Father of Visual Basic." For the last decade, Alan’s interaction design consulting firm, Cooper, has helped companies invent powerful, usable, desirable software and improve digital product behavior through the use of Alan’s unique methodology – the Goal-Directed process. A cornerstone of this method, the use of personas, has been widely adopted since it was first described in Alan’s second book, The Inmates are Running the Asylum. A best-selling author and popular speaker, Alan is a tireless advocate for integrating design into business practice and for humanizing technology.

Robert Reimann has spent the past 15 years pushing the boundaries of digital products as a designer, writer, lecturer, and consultant. He has led dozens of design consulting projects for startups and Fortune 500 clients alike. Upon joining Cooper in 1996, Robert led the development and refinement of many Goal-Directed Design methods described in About Face 2.0. He has lectur ed at major universities and to international industry audiences, and he is a member of the industry advisory board for the Institute of Design at the University of California, Berkeley.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Section One: Know Thy User.

Part I: Bridging the Gap.

Chapter 1: Goal-Directed Design.

Chapter 2: Implementation Models and Mental Models.

Chapter 3: Beginners, Experts, and Intermediates.

Chapter 4: Understanding Users: Qualitative Research.

Chapter 5: Modeling Users: Personas and Goals.

Chapter 6: Scenarios: Translating Goals into Design.

Chapter 7: Synthesizing Good Design: Principles and Patterns.

Section Two: Designing Behavior and Form.

Part II: Achieving Goals and Removing Barriers.

Chapter 8: Software Posture.

Chapter 9: Orchestration and Flow.

Chapter 10: Eliminating Excise.

Chapter 11: Navigation and Inflection.

Chapter 12: Understanding Undo.

Chapter 13: Rethinking Files and Save.

Part III: Providing Power and Pleasure.

Chapter 14: Making Software Considerate.

Chapter 15: Making Software Smart.

Chapter 16: Improving Data Ret rieval.

Chapter 17: Improving Data Entry.

Chapter 18: Designing for Different Needs.

Part IV: Applying Visual Design Principles.

Chapter 19: Designing Look and Feel.

Chapter 20: Metaphors, Idioms, and Affordances.

Section Three: Interaction Details.

Part V: Mice and Manipulation.

Chapter 21: Direct Manipulation and Pointing Devices.

Chapter 22: Selection.

Chapter 23: Drag and Drop.

Chapter 24: Manipulating Controls, Objects, and Connections.

Part VI: Controls and Their Behaviors.

Chapter 25: Window Behaviors.

Chapter 26: Using Controls.

Chapter 27: Menus: The Pedagogic Vector.

Chapter 28: Using Menus.

Chapter 29: Using Toolbars and ToolTips.

Chapter 30: Using Dialogs.

Chapter 31: Dialog Etiquette.

Chapter 32: Creating Better Controls.

Part VII: Communicating with Users.

Chapter 33: Eliminating Errors.

Chapter 34: Notifying and Confirming.

Chapter 35: Other Communication with Users.

Chapter 36: The Installation Process.

Part VIII: Designing Beyond the Desktop.

Chapter 37: Designing for the Web.

Chapter 38: Designing for Embedded Systems.

Afterword: Dealing with the Inmates.

Appendix A: Axioms.

Appendix B: Design Tips.

Appendix C: Bibliography

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)