BN.com Gift Guide

About Face

Overview

What is special about the face, and what happens when neurological conditions make expression or comprehension of the face unavailable? Through a mix of science, autobiography, case studies, and speculation, Jonathan Cole shows the importance not only of facial expressions for communication among individuals but also of facial embodiment for our sense of self. He presents, in his words, "a natural history of the face and an unnatural history of those who live without it."

The ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $13.82   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

What is special about the face, and what happens when neurological conditions make expression or comprehension of the face unavailable? Through a mix of science, autobiography, case studies, and speculation, Jonathan Cole shows the importance not only of facial expressions for communication among individuals but also of facial embodiment for our sense of self. He presents, in his words, "a natural history of the face and an unnatural history of those who live without it."

The heart of the book lies in the experiences of people with facial losses of various kinds. The case studies are of blind, autistic, and neurologically impaired persons; the most extreme case involves Mobius syndrome, in which individuals are born with a total inability to move their facial muscles and hence to make facial expressions. Cole suggests that it is only by studying such personal narratives of loss that we can understand facial function and something of what all our faces reflect.

Through science, autobiography & various case studies the author examines facial expressions for communication, etc.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
" About Face ... is, I believe, a truly important book, which could do much to counteract the extremes of sociobiological reductionism." John Cornwell SundayTimes (UK)
Sunday Times (UK) - John Cornwell
About Face ... is, I believe, a truly important book,which could do much to counteract the extremes of sociobiological reductionism.
Journal of the American Medical Association
About Face should be required reading for students of clinical neurology and others who are interested in the mechanisms by which disease alters the ability to communicate by facial expression and for those who are interested in the response of persons to such loss.
Kirkus Reviews
A physician's curiosity leads him to a subject oddly underexplored in its own right: the face.

British neurophysiologist Cole pursues the link between our faces and our inner selves in a science-minded inquiry that is very much a natural history rather than a cultural one. But it's not strictly scientific, either: Cole's topic lies among questions just out of the confident grasp of science—the nature and relationship of mind and body, of thoughts and feelings, the definition of consciousness itself. Given that, Cole assembles persuasive speculations from his journalistic research among people who either can't perceive facial expressions or can't make them as a result of blindness, autism, disfigurement, or face-impairing Möbius syndrome, Bell's palsy, and Parkinson's disease. Despite the variety of conditions described in these uniformly heartfelt interviews, his conclusions from them are largely similar: that facial expression exists somewhere pivotal between the mental and the physical, that the face, beyond simply expressing interior states, actually affects the emotional life through its importance in relating to others. The chapters on autistic subjects—for whom the disctinctions between self and others, body and mind and emotion, are strangely ruptured—are powerfully suggestive of the complexity of the face's meaning; but relying heavily, in brief encounters, on the ad hoc personal vocabulary used by subjects to try to explain their experiences, this study remains little more than suggestive. But that's only to say that Cole has initiated an ambitious synthesis, putting the face at the center of various disciplines that touch on it—neurological, psychiatric, evolutionary (he surmises that faces function emotionally in primates' individual relationships as well as humans') that may be taken up by such specialists in response to his impressions.

A genial peek—in the mirror, as it were—at the mystery of the self.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262531634
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 2/26/1999
  • Series: Bradford Books Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 237
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan Cole, D.M., F.R.C.P., is Consultant in Clinical Neurophysiology, Poole Hospital, and at Salisbury Hospital (with its Spinal Centre), a Professor at Bournemouth University and a visiting Senior Lecturer, Southampton University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1 The Pre-face: "Tell, Please"
Mary
Opening the Seam
"Tell, Please"
Looking through the Window
2 Residing in Voices
"Not Like a Hand"
A Politician Who Finds It Difficult to Smile
3 We Do Not Share the Same World
Floods of Faces
Sweating Blood
4 Bone to Brain
Fish Face
Darwin's Nose
The Anatomy of a Smile
The Vanity of Astronauts
Bell's Nerve
Laughter and Sorrow
Cars and Faces
5 Chimpanzees' Dreams
From Aristotle to Darwin
Universal Faces
Culture and Colors
Smiling Happy People?
Decoding Primate Faces
Howlett's Zoo, Kent
Monkey World, Dorset
The Tavistock Institute, London
6 Born Independent
Theory of Mind
Feelings of Soul
The Color of Hair
7 Like a Ball Off a Wall
8 The Spectator
Imitation, Self, and Others
Child's Play
In the Playground
The Reflection of Ourselves
James
9 One Big Family
George
10 Dull and Boring?
Oliver
Mrs. Doubtfire
Coming Alive--The Video
Grumpy
11 Changing Faces
Seven Years of Trial and Error
Seeing the Enemy
12 Face Odyssey
Maps of Feelings
Hearing Emotions, Thinking Emotions
Controlling Emotions
Measuring Skulls
No Different Today
William James and James
Phantom Emotions
Face Value
Theory of Mind?
Seeing Consciousness
The Divine Fantasy
Notes
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)